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xapi-gwt-parent from group net.wetheinter (version 0.5)

This is the main aggregator for all gwt submodules. All gwt-specific code resides here. Submodules should avoid inheriting from each other unless necessary. This goes for maven structure and gwt.xml structure. The super module is where our jre emulation layer and super-source live; all modules should inherit super, and a minimum of other modules. Some modules, like injection, are fulfilling an api in the core module, and should be accessed only through core service interfaces. Other modules, like reflection, are capable of being standalone inherits, but can benefit from core utilities like injection, so, two (or more) .gwt.xml modules may be provided. As XApi nears 1.0, all submodules will be routinely stitched together into an uber-jar, in order to have a single jar with a single gwt module that can provide all of the services at once. Internal projects will never use the uber jar, to help maintain modularity, but external projects that want to use more than one service will certainly prefer inheriting one artifact, instead of twelve. When distributed in uber-jar format, it will likely be necessary for either the uber jar, or just xapi-gwt-api.jar to appear before gwt-dev on your compile-time classpath. If using gwt-maven-plugin, the gwtFirstOnClasspath option may become problematic. If so, we will provide a forked gwt-plugin to make sure our compiler enhancements are included in the build process. There is also work going on to make a super-source-everything plugin, which will use maven to find source files, and generate synthetic .gwt.xml for you, as part of an effort to create a wholly unified programming environment. In addition to java-to-javascript, we intend to compile java-to-java and possibly other languages, like go; imagine implementing gwt deferred binding to eliminate cross-platform differences between server environments, or operating systems, or versions of a platform, or anywhere else a core api needs to bind to multiple implementations, depending on the runtime environment.

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Artifact xapi-gwt-parent
Group net.wetheinter
Version 0.5
Last update 30. May 2015
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL WeTheInter.net
License not specified
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
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mahout-eclipse-support from group org.apache.mahout (version 0.5)

Group: org.apache.mahout Artifact: mahout-eclipse-support
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Artifact mahout-eclipse-support
Group org.apache.mahout
Version 0.5
Last update 28. May 2011
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL Not specified
License not specified
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
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mahout-parent from group org.apache.mahout (version 0.3)

Mahout's goal is to build scalable machine learning libraries. With scalable we mean: Scalable to reasonably large data sets. Our core algorithms for clustering, classfication and batch based collaborative filtering are implemented on top of Apache Hadoop using the map/reduce paradigm. However we do not restrict contributions to Hadoop based implementations: Contributions that run on a single node or on a non-Hadoop cluster are welcome as well. The core libraries are highly optimized to allow for good performance also for non-distributed algorithms. Scalable to support your business case. Mahout is distributed under a commercially friendly Apache Software license. Scalable community. The goal of Mahout is to build a vibrant, responsive, diverse community to facilitate discussions not only on the project itself but also on potential use cases. Come to the mailing lists to find out more. Currently Mahout supports mainly four use cases: Recommendation mining takes users' behavior and from that tries to find items users might like. Clustering takes e.g. text documents and groups them into groups of topically related documents. Classification learns from exisiting categorized documents what documents of a specific category look like and is able to assign unlabelled documents to the (hopefully) correct category. Frequent itemset mining takes a set of item groups (terms in a query session, shopping cart content) and identifies, which individual items usually appear together.

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Artifact mahout-parent
Group org.apache.mahout
Version 0.3
Last update 12. March 2010
Newest version Yes
Organization The Apache Software Foundation
URL http://lucene.apache.org/mahout
License The Apache Software License, Version 2.0
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
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pact-jvm-provider from group au.com.dius (version 4.0.8)

Pact provider ============= sub project of https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm The pact provider is responsible for verifying that an API provider adheres to a number of pacts authored by its clients This library provides the basic tools required to automate the process, and should be usable on its own in many instances. Framework and build tool specific bindings will be provided in separate libraries that build on top of this core functionality. ### Provider State Before each interaction is executed, the provider under test will have the opportunity to enter a state. Generally the state maps to a set of fixture data for mocking out services that the provider is a consumer of (they will have their own pacts) The pact framework will instruct the test server to enter that state by sending: POST "${config.stateChangeUrl.url}/setup" { "state" : "${interaction.stateName}" } ### An example of running provider verification with junit This example uses Groovy, JUnit 4 and Hamcrest matchers to run the provider verification. As the provider service is a DropWizard application, it uses the DropwizardAppRule to startup the service before running any test. **Warning:** It only grabs the first interaction from the pact file with the consumer, where there could be many. (This could possibly be solved with a parameterized test) ```groovy class ReadmeExamplePactJVMProviderJUnitTest { @ClassRule public static final TestRule startServiceRule = new DropwizardAppRule<DropwizardConfiguration>( TestDropwizardApplication, ResourceHelpers.resourceFilePath('dropwizard/test-config.yaml')) private static ProviderInfo serviceProvider private static Pact<RequestResponseInteraction> testConsumerPact private static ConsumerInfo consumer @BeforeClass static void setupProvider() { serviceProvider = new ProviderInfo('Dropwizard App') serviceProvider.setProtocol('http') serviceProvider.setHost('localhost') serviceProvider.setPort(8080) serviceProvider.setPath('/') consumer = new ConsumerInfo() consumer.setName('test_consumer') consumer.setPactSource(new UrlSource( ReadmeExamplePactJVMProviderJUnitTest.getResource('/pacts/zoo_app-animal_service.json').toString())) testConsumerPact = DefaultPactReader.INSTANCE.loadPact(consumer.getPactSource()) as Pact<RequestResponseInteraction> } @Test void runConsumerPacts() { // grab the first interaction from the pact with consumer Interaction interaction = testConsumerPact.interactions.get(0) // setup the verifier ProviderVerifier verifier = setupVerifier(interaction, serviceProvider, consumer) // setup any provider state // setup the client and interaction to fire against the provider ProviderClient client = new ProviderClient(serviceProvider, new HttpClientFactory()) Map<String, Object> failures = new HashMap<>() verifier.verifyResponseFromProvider(serviceProvider, interaction, interaction.getDescription(), failures, client) // normally assert all good, but in this example it will fail assertThat(failures, is(not(empty()))) verifier.displayFailures(failures) } private ProviderVerifier setupVerifier(Interaction interaction, ProviderInfo provider, ConsumerInfo consumer) { ProviderVerifier verifier = new ProviderVerifier() verifier.initialiseReporters(provider) verifier.reportVerificationForConsumer(consumer, provider, new UrlSource('http://example.example')) if (!interaction.getProviderStates().isEmpty()) { for (ProviderState providerState: interaction.getProviderStates()) { verifier.reportStateForInteraction(providerState.getName(), provider, consumer, true) } } verifier.reportInteractionDescription(interaction) return verifier } } ``` ### An example of running provider verification with spock This example uses groovy and spock to run the provider verification. Again the provider service is a DropWizard application, and is using the DropwizardAppRule to startup the service. This example runs all interactions using spocks Unroll feature ```groovy class ReadmeExamplePactJVMProviderSpockSpec extends Specification { @ClassRule @Shared TestRule startServiceRule = new DropwizardAppRule<DropwizardConfiguration>(TestDropwizardApplication, ResourceHelpers.resourceFilePath('dropwizard/test-config.yaml')) @Shared ProviderInfo serviceProvider ProviderVerifier verifier def setupSpec() { serviceProvider = new ProviderInfo('Dropwizard App') serviceProvider.protocol = 'http' serviceProvider.host = 'localhost' serviceProvider.port = 8080 serviceProvider.path = '/' serviceProvider.hasPactWith('zoo_app') { consumer -> consumer.pactSource = new FileSource(new File(ResourceHelpers.resourceFilePath('pacts/zoo_app-animal_service.json'))) } } def setup() { verifier = new ProviderVerifier() } def cleanup() { // cleanup provider state // ie. db.truncateAllTables() } def cleanupSpec() { // cleanup provider } @Unroll def "Provider Pact - With Consumer #consumer"() { expect: !verifyConsumerPact(consumer).empty where: consumer << serviceProvider.consumers } private Map verifyConsumerPact(ConsumerInfo consumer) { Map failures = [:] verifier.initialiseReporters(serviceProvider) verifier.runVerificationForConsumer(failures, serviceProvider, consumer) if (!failures.empty) { verifier.displayFailures(failures) } failures } } ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-provider
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Artifact pact-jvm-provider
Group au.com.dius
Version 4.0.8
Last update 22. March 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 8
Dependencies commons-io, jansi, httpclient, pact-jvm-core-model, pact-jvm-core-pact-broker, pact-jvm-core-matchers, pact-jvm-core-support, arrow-core-extensions,
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pact-jvm-consumer-junit5 from group au.com.dius (version 4.0.8)

pact-jvm-consumer-junit5 ======================== JUnit 5 support for Pact consumer tests ## Dependency The library is available on maven central using: * group-id = `au.com.dius` * artifact-id = `pact-jvm-consumer-junit5` * version-id = `4.0.x` ## Usage ### 1. Add the Pact consumer test extension to the test class. To write Pact consumer tests with JUnit 5, you need to add `@ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt)` to your test class. This replaces the `PactRunner` used for JUnit 4 tests. The rest of the test follows a similar pattern as for JUnit 4 tests. ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` ### 2. create a method annotated with `@Pact` that returns the interactions for the test For each test (as with JUnit 4), you need to define a method annotated with the `@Pact` annotation that returns the interactions for the test. ```java @Pact(provider="ArticlesProvider", consumer="test_consumer") public RequestResponsePact createPact(PactDslWithProvider builder) { return builder .given("test state") .uponReceiving("ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest test interaction") .path("/articles.json") .method("GET") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"responsetest\": true}") .toPact(); } ``` ### 3. Link the mock server with the interactions for the test with `@PactTestFor` Then the final step is to use the `@PactTestFor` annotation to tell the Pact extension how to setup the Pact test. You can either put this annotation on the test class, or on the test method. For examples see [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) and [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy). The `@PactTestFor` annotation allows you to control the mock server in the same way as the JUnit 4 `PactProviderRule`. It allows you to set the hostname to bind to (default is `localhost`) and the port (default is to use a random port). You can also set the Pact specification version to use (default is V3). ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) @PactTestFor(providerName = "ArticlesProvider") public class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` **NOTE on the hostname**: The mock server runs in the same JVM as the test, so the only valid values for hostname are: | hostname | result | | -------- | ------ | | `localhost` | binds to the address that localhost points to (normally the loopback adapter) | | `127.0.0.1` or `::1` | binds to the loopback adapter | | host name | binds to the default interface that the host machines DNS name resolves to | | `0.0.0.0` or `::` | binds to the all interfaces on the host machine | #### Matching the interactions by provider name If you set the `providerName` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the first method with a `@Pact` annotation with the same provider name will be used. See [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) for an example. #### Matching the interactions by method name If you set the `pactMethod` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the method with the provided name will be used (it still needs a `@Pact` annotation). See [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy) for an example. ### Injecting the mock server into the test You can get the mock server injected into the test method by adding a `MockServer` parameter to the test method. ```java @Test void test(MockServer mockServer) throws IOException { HttpResponse httpResponse = Request.Get(mockServer.getUrl() + "/articles.json").execute().returnResponse(); assertThat(httpResponse.getStatusLine().getStatusCode(), is(equalTo(200))); } ``` This helps with getting the base URL of the mock server, especially when a random port is used. ## Changing the directory pact files are written to By default, pact files are written to `target/pacts` (or `build/pacts` if you use Gradle), but this can be overwritten with the `pact.rootDir` system property. This property needs to be set on the test JVM as most build tools will fork a new JVM to run the tests. For Gradle, add this to your build.gradle: ```groovy test { systemProperties['pact.rootDir'] = "$buildDir/custom-pacts-directory" } ``` For maven, use the systemPropertyVariables configuration: ```xml <project> [...] <build> <plugins> <plugin> <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId> <version>2.18</version> <configuration> <systemPropertyVariables> <pact.rootDir>some/other/directory</pact.rootDir> <buildDirectory>${project.build.directory}</buildDirectory> [...] </systemPropertyVariables> </configuration> </plugin> </plugins> </build> [...] </project> ``` For SBT: ```scala fork in Test := true, javaOptions in Test := Seq("-Dpact.rootDir=some/other/directory") ``` ### Using `@PactFolder` annotation You can override the directory the pacts are written in a test by adding the `@PactFolder` annotation to the test class. ## Forcing pact files to be overwritten (3.6.5+) By default, when the pact file is written, it will be merged with any existing pact file. To force the file to be overwritten, set the Java system property `pact.writer.overwrite` to `true`. ## Unsupported The current implementation does not support tests with multiple providers. This will be added in a later release. # Having values injected from provider state callbacks (3.6.11+) You can have values from the provider state callbacks be injected into most places (paths, query parameters, headers, bodies, etc.). This works by using the V3 spec generators with provider state callbacks that return values. One example of where this would be useful is API calls that require an ID which would be auto-generated by the database on the provider side, so there is no way to know what the ID would be beforehand. The following DSL methods all you to set an expression that will be parsed with the values returned from the provider states: For JSON bodies, use `valueFromProviderState`.<br/> For headers, use `headerFromProviderState`.<br/> For query parameters, use `queryParameterFromProviderState`.<br/> For paths, use `pathFromProviderState`. For example, assume that an API call is made to get the details of a user by ID. A provider state can be defined that specifies that the user must be exist, but the ID will be created when the user is created. So we can then define an expression for the path where the ID will be replaced with the value returned from the provider state callback. ```java .pathFromProviderState("/api/users/${id}", "/api/users/100") ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-consumer-junit5
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Artifact pact-jvm-consumer-junit5
Group au.com.dius
Version 4.0.8
Last update 22. March 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 2
Dependencies junit-jupiter-api, pact-jvm-consumer,
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pact-jvm-server from group au.com.dius (version 4.0.8)

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-server
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pact-jvm-server_2.12 from group au.com.dius (version 3.6.14)

Pact server =========== The pact server is a stand-alone interactions recorder and verifier, aimed at clients that are non-JVM or non-Ruby based. The pact client for that platform will need to be implemented, but it only be responsible for generating the `JSON` interactions, running the tests and communicating with the server. The server implements a `JSON` `REST` Admin API with the following endpoints. / -> For diagnostics, currently returns a list of ports of the running mock servers. /create -> For initialising a test server and submitting the JSON interactions. It returns a port /complete -> For finalising and verifying the interactions with the server. It writes the `JSON` pact file to disk. ## Running the server ### Versions 2.2.6+ Pact server takes the following parameters: ``` Usage: pact-jvm-server [options] [port] port port to run on (defaults to 29999) --help prints this usage text -h <value> | --host <value> host to bind to (defaults to localhost) -l <value> | --mock-port-lower <value> lower bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 20000) -u <value> | --mock-port-upper <value> upper bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 40000) -d | --daemon run as a daemon process -v <value> | --pact-version <value> pact version to generate for (2 or 3) -k <value> | --keystore-path <value> Path to keystore -p <value> | --keystore-password <value> Keystore password -s <value> | --ssl-port <value> Ssl port the mock server should run on. lower and upper bounds are ignored --debug run with debug logging ``` ### Using trust store 3.4.0+ Trust store can be used. However, it is limited to a single port for the time being. ### Prior to version 2.2.6 Pact server takes one optional parameter, the port number to listen on. If not provided, it will listen on 29999. It requires an active console to run. ### Using a distribution archive You can download a [distribution from maven central](http://search.maven.org/remotecontent?filepath=au/com/dius/pact-jvm-server_2.11/2.2.4/). There is both a ZIP and TAR archive. Unpack it to a directory of choice and then run the script in the bin directory. ### Building a distribution bundle You can build an application bundle with gradle by running (for 2.11 version): $ ./gradlew :pact-jvm-server_2.11:installdist This will create an app bundle in `build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11`. You can then execute it with: $ java -jar pact-jvm-server/build/2.10/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/lib/pact-jvm-server_2.11-3.2.11.jar or with the generated bundle script file: $ pact-jvm-server/build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/bin/pact-jvm-server_2.11 By default will run on port `29999` but a port number can be optionally supplied. ### Running it with docker You can use a docker image to execute the mock server as a docker container. $ docker run -d -p 8080:8080 -p 20000-20010:20000-20010 uglyog/pact-jvm-server This will run the main server on port 8080, and each created mock server on ports 20000-20010. You can map the ports to any you require. ## Life cycle The following actions are expected to occur * The client calls `/create` to initialise a server with the expected `JSON` interactions and state * The admin server will start a mock server on a random port and return the port number in the response * The client will execute its interaction tests against the mock server with the supplied port * Once finished, the client will call `/complete' on the Admin API, posting the port number * The pact server will verify the interactions and write the `JSON` `pact` file to disk under `/target` * The mock server running on the supplied port will be shutdown. ## Endpoints ### /create The client will need `POST` to `/create` the generated `JSON` interactions, also providing a state as a query parameter and a path. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/create?state=NoUsers&path=/sub/ref/path '{ "provider": { "name": "Animal_Service"}, ... }' This will create a new running mock service provider on a randomly generated port. The port will be returned in the `201` response: { "port" : 34423 } But you can also reference the path from `/sub/ref/path` using the server port. The service will not strip the prefix path, but instead will use it as a differentiator. If your services do not have differences in the prefix of their path, then you will have to use the port method. ### /complete Once the client has finished running its tests against the mock server on the supplied port (in this example port `34423`) the client will need to `POST` to `/complete` the port number of the mock server that was used. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/complete '{ "port" : 34423 }' This will cause the Pact server to verify the interactions, shutdown the mock server running on that port and writing the pact `JSON` file to disk under the `target` directory. ### / The `/` endpoint is for diagnostics and to check that the pact server is running. It will return all the currently running mock servers port numbers. For example: GET http://localhost:29999/ '{ "ports": [23443,43232] }'

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-server_2.12
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Artifact pact-jvm-server_2.12
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.6.14
Last update 28. September 2019
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 4
Dependencies pact-jvm-consumer_2.12, logback-core, logback-classic, scopt_2.12,
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pact-jvm-provider_2.12 from group au.com.dius (version 3.6.14)

Pact provider ============= sub project of https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm The pact provider is responsible for verifying that an API provider adheres to a number of pacts authored by its clients This library provides the basic tools required to automate the process, and should be usable on its own in many instances. Framework and build tool specific bindings will be provided in separate libraries that build on top of this core functionality. ### Provider State Before each interaction is executed, the provider under test will have the opportunity to enter a state. Generally the state maps to a set of fixture data for mocking out services that the provider is a consumer of (they will have their own pacts) The pact framework will instruct the test server to enter that state by sending: POST "${config.stateChangeUrl.url}/setup" { "state" : "${interaction.stateName}" } ### An example of running provider verification with junit This example uses Groovy, JUnit 4 and Hamcrest matchers to run the provider verification. As the provider service is a DropWizard application, it uses the DropwizardAppRule to startup the service before running any test. **Warning:** It only grabs the first interaction from the pact file with the consumer, where there could be many. (This could possibly be solved with a parameterized test) ```groovy class ReadmeExamplePactJVMProviderJUnitTest { @ClassRule public static TestRule startServiceRule = new DropwizardAppRule<DropwizardConfiguration>( TestDropwizardApplication.class, ResourceHelpers.resourceFilePath("dropwizard/test-config.yaml")) private static ProviderInfo serviceProvider private static Pact<RequestResponseInteraction> testConsumerPact private static ConsumerInfo consumer @BeforeClass static void setupProvider() { serviceProvider = new ProviderInfo("Dropwizard App") serviceProvider.setProtocol("http") serviceProvider.setHost("localhost") serviceProvider.setPort(8080) serviceProvider.setPath("/") consumer = new ConsumerInfo() consumer.setName("test_consumer") consumer.setPactSource(new UrlSource( ReadmeExamplePactJVMProviderJUnitTest.getResource("/pacts/zoo_app-animal_service.json").toString())) testConsumerPact = PactReader.loadPact(consumer.getPactSource()) as Pact<RequestResponseInteraction> } @Test void runConsumerPacts() { // grab the first interaction from the pact with consumer Interaction interaction = testConsumerPact.interactions.get(0) // setup the verifier ProviderVerifier verifier = setupVerifier(interaction, serviceProvider, consumer) // setup any provider state // setup the client and interaction to fire against the provider ProviderClient client = new ProviderClient(serviceProvider, new HttpClientFactory()) Map<String, Object> failures = new HashMap<>() verifier.verifyResponseFromProvider(serviceProvider, interaction, interaction.getDescription(), failures, client) if (!failures.isEmpty()) { verifier.displayFailures(failures) } // Assert all good assertThat(failures, is(empty())) } private ProviderVerifier setupVerifier(Interaction interaction, ProviderInfo provider, ConsumerInfo consumer) { ProviderVerifier verifier = new ProviderVerifier() verifier.initialiseReporters(provider) verifier.reportVerificationForConsumer(consumer, provider) if (!interaction.getProviderStates().isEmpty()) { for (ProviderState providerState: interaction.getProviderStates()) { verifier.reportStateForInteraction(providerState.getName(), provider, consumer, true) } } verifier.reportInteractionDescription(interaction) return verifier } } ``` ### An example of running provider verification with spock This example uses groovy and spock to run the provider verification. Again the provider service is a DropWizard application, and is using the DropwizardAppRule to startup the service. This example runs all interactions using spocks Unroll feature ```groovy class ReadmeExamplePactJVMProviderSpockSpec extends Specification { @ClassRule @Shared TestRule startServiceRule = new DropwizardAppRule<DropwizardConfiguration>(TestDropwizardApplication, ResourceHelpers.resourceFilePath('dropwizard/test-config.yaml')) @Shared ProviderInfo serviceProvider ProviderVerifier verifier def setupSpec() { serviceProvider = new ProviderInfo('Dropwizard App') serviceProvider.protocol = 'http' serviceProvider.host = 'localhost' serviceProvider.port = 8080 serviceProvider.path = '/' serviceProvider.hasPactWith('zoo_app') { pactSource = new FileSource(new File(ResourceHelpers.resourceFilePath('pacts/zoo_app-animal_service.json'))) } } def setup() { verifier = new ProviderVerifier() } def cleanup() { // cleanup provider state // ie. db.truncateAllTables() } def cleanupSpec() { // cleanup provider } @Unroll def "Provider Pact - With Consumer #consumer"() { expect: verifyConsumerPact(consumer).empty where: consumer << serviceProvider.consumers } private Map verifyConsumerPact(ConsumerInfo consumer) { Map failures = [:] verifier.initialiseReporters(serviceProvider) verifier.runVerificationForConsumer(failures, serviceProvider, consumer) if (!failures.empty) { verifier.displayFailures(failures) } failures } } ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-provider_2.12
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3 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-provider_2.12
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.6.14
Last update 28. September 2019
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 9
Dependencies pact-jvm-model, pact-jvm-pact-broker, pact-jvm-matchers_2.12, commons-io, jansi, httpclient, reflections, pact-jvm-support, scala-java8-compat_2.12,
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pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.12 from group au.com.dius (version 3.6.14)

pact-jvm-consumer-junit5 ======================== JUnit 5 support for Pact consumer tests ## Dependency The library is available on maven central using: * group-id = `au.com.dius` * artifact-id = `pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.12` * version-id = `3.6.x` ## Usage ### 1. Add the Pact consumer test extension to the test class. To write Pact consumer tests with JUnit 5, you need to add `@ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt)` to your test class. This replaces the `PactRunner` used for JUnit 4 tests. The rest of the test follows a similar pattern as for JUnit 4 tests. ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` ### 2. create a method annotated with `@Pact` that returns the interactions for the test For each test (as with JUnit 4), you need to define a method annotated with the `@Pact` annotation that returns the interactions for the test. ```java @Pact(provider="ArticlesProvider", consumer="test_consumer") public RequestResponsePact createPact(PactDslWithProvider builder) { return builder .given("test state") .uponReceiving("ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest test interaction") .path("/articles.json") .method("GET") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"responsetest\": true}") .toPact(); } ``` ### 3. Link the mock server with the interactions for the test with `@PactTestFor` Then the final step is to use the `@PactTestFor` annotation to tell the Pact extension how to setup the Pact test. You can either put this annotation on the test class, or on the test method. For examples see [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) and [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy). The `@PactTestFor` annotation allows you to control the mock server in the same way as the JUnit 4 `PactProviderRule`. It allows you to set the hostname to bind to (default is `localhost`) and the port (default is to use a random port). You can also set the Pact specification version to use (default is V3). ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) @PactTestFor(providerName = "ArticlesProvider") public class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` **NOTE on the hostname**: The mock server runs in the same JVM as the test, so the only valid values for hostname are: | hostname | result | | -------- | ------ | | `localhost` | binds to the address that localhost points to (normally the loopback adapter) | | `127.0.0.1` or `::1` | binds to the loopback adapter | | host name | binds to the default interface that the host machines DNS name resolves to | | `0.0.0.0` or `::` | binds to the all interfaces on the host machine | #### Matching the interactions by provider name If you set the `providerName` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the first method with a `@Pact` annotation with the same provider name will be used. See [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) for an example. #### Matching the interactions by method name If you set the `pactMethod` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the method with the provided name will be used (it still needs a `@Pact` annotation). See [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy) for an example. ### Injecting the mock server into the test You can get the mock server injected into the test method by adding a `MockServer` parameter to the test method. ```java @Test void test(MockServer mockServer) throws IOException { HttpResponse httpResponse = Request.Get(mockServer.getUrl() + "/articles.json").execute().returnResponse(); assertThat(httpResponse.getStatusLine().getStatusCode(), is(equalTo(200))); } ``` This helps with getting the base URL of the mock server, especially when a random port is used. ## Changing the directory pact files are written to By default, pact files are written to `target/pacts` (or `build/pacts` if you use Gradle), but this can be overwritten with the `pact.rootDir` system property. This property needs to be set on the test JVM as most build tools will fork a new JVM to run the tests. For Gradle, add this to your build.gradle: ```groovy test { systemProperties['pact.rootDir'] = "$buildDir/custom-pacts-directory" } ``` For maven, use the systemPropertyVariables configuration: ```xml <project> [...] <build> <plugins> <plugin> <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId> <version>2.18</version> <configuration> <systemPropertyVariables> <pact.rootDir>some/other/directory</pact.rootDir> <buildDirectory>${project.build.directory}</buildDirectory> [...] </systemPropertyVariables> </configuration> </plugin> </plugins> </build> [...] </project> ``` For SBT: ```scala fork in Test := true, javaOptions in Test := Seq("-Dpact.rootDir=some/other/directory") ``` ### Using `@PactFolder` annotation [3.6.2+] You can override the directory the pacts are written in a test by adding the `@PactFolder` annotation to the test class. ## Forcing pact files to be overwritten (3.6.5+) By default, when the pact file is written, it will be merged with any existing pact file. To force the file to be overwritten, set the Java system property `pact.writer.overwrite` to `true`. ## Unsupported The current implementation does not support tests with multiple providers. This will be added in a later release. # Having values injected from provider state callbacks (3.6.11+) You can have values from the provider state callbacks be injected into most places (paths, query parameters, headers, bodies, etc.). This works by using the V3 spec generators with provider state callbacks that return values. One example of where this would be useful is API calls that require an ID which would be auto-generated by the database on the provider side, so there is no way to know what the ID would be beforehand. The following DSL methods all you to set an expression that will be parsed with the values returned from the provider states: For JSON bodies, use `valueFromProviderState`.<br/> For headers, use `headerFromProviderState`.<br/> For query parameters, use `queryParameterFromProviderState`.<br/> For paths, use `pathFromProviderState`. For example, assume that an API call is made to get the details of a user by ID. A provider state can be defined that specifies that the user must be exist, but the ID will be created when the user is created. So we can then define an expression for the path where the ID will be replaced with the value returned from the provider state callback. ```java .pathFromProviderState("/api/users/${id}", "/api/users/100") ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.12
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3 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.12
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.6.14
Last update 28. September 2019
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 2
Dependencies pact-jvm-consumer_2.12, junit-jupiter-api,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-provider_2.11 from group au.com.dius (version 3.5.24)

Pact provider ============= sub project of https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm The pact provider is responsible for verifying that an API provider adheres to a number of pacts authored by its clients This library provides the basic tools required to automate the process, and should be usable on its own in many instances. Framework and build tool specific bindings will be provided in separate libraries that build on top of this core functionality. ### Provider State Before each interaction is executed, the provider under test will have the opportunity to enter a state. Generally the state maps to a set of fixture data for mocking out services that the provider is a consumer of (they will have their own pacts) The pact framework will instruct the test server to enter that state by sending: POST "${config.stateChangeUrl.url}/setup" { "state" : "${interaction.stateName}" } ### An example of running provider verification with junit This example uses Groovy, JUnit 4 and Hamcrest matchers to run the provider verification. As the provider service is a DropWizard application, it uses the DropwizardAppRule to startup the service before running any test. **Warning:** It only grabs the first interaction from the pact file with the consumer, where there could be many. (This could possibly be solved with a parameterized test) ```groovy class ReadmeExamplePactJVMProviderJUnitTest { @ClassRule public static TestRule startServiceRule = new DropwizardAppRule<DropwizardConfiguration>( TestDropwizardApplication.class, ResourceHelpers.resourceFilePath("dropwizard/test-config.yaml")) private static ProviderInfo serviceProvider private static Pact<RequestResponseInteraction> testConsumerPact private static ConsumerInfo consumer @BeforeClass static void setupProvider() { serviceProvider = new ProviderInfo("Dropwizard App") serviceProvider.setProtocol("http") serviceProvider.setHost("localhost") serviceProvider.setPort(8080) serviceProvider.setPath("/") consumer = new ConsumerInfo() consumer.setName("test_consumer") consumer.setPactSource(new UrlSource( ReadmeExamplePactJVMProviderJUnitTest.getResource("/pacts/zoo_app-animal_service.json").toString())) testConsumerPact = PactReader.loadPact(consumer.getPactSource()) as Pact<RequestResponseInteraction> } @Test void runConsumerPacts() { // grab the first interaction from the pact with consumer Interaction interaction = testConsumerPact.interactions.get(0) // setup the verifier ProviderVerifier verifier = setupVerifier(interaction, serviceProvider, consumer) // setup any provider state // setup the client and interaction to fire against the provider ProviderClient client = new ProviderClient(serviceProvider, new HttpClientFactory()) Map<String, Object> failures = new HashMap<>() verifier.verifyResponseFromProvider(serviceProvider, interaction, interaction.getDescription(), failures, client) if (!failures.isEmpty()) { verifier.displayFailures(failures) } // Assert all good assertThat(failures, is(empty())) } private ProviderVerifier setupVerifier(Interaction interaction, ProviderInfo provider, ConsumerInfo consumer) { ProviderVerifier verifier = new ProviderVerifier() verifier.initialiseReporters(provider) verifier.reportVerificationForConsumer(consumer, provider) if (!interaction.getProviderStates().isEmpty()) { for (ProviderState providerState: interaction.getProviderStates()) { verifier.reportStateForInteraction(providerState.getName(), provider, consumer, true) } } verifier.reportInteractionDescription(interaction) return verifier } } ``` ### An example of running provider verification with spock This example uses groovy and spock to run the provider verification. Again the provider service is a DropWizard application, and is using the DropwizardAppRule to startup the service. This example runs all interactions using spocks Unroll feature ```groovy class ReadmeExamplePactJVMProviderSpockSpec extends Specification { @ClassRule @Shared TestRule startServiceRule = new DropwizardAppRule<DropwizardConfiguration>(TestDropwizardApplication, ResourceHelpers.resourceFilePath('dropwizard/test-config.yaml')) @Shared ProviderInfo serviceProvider ProviderVerifier verifier def setupSpec() { serviceProvider = new ProviderInfo('Dropwizard App') serviceProvider.protocol = 'http' serviceProvider.host = 'localhost' serviceProvider.port = 8080 serviceProvider.path = '/' serviceProvider.hasPactWith('zoo_app') { pactSource = new FileSource(new File(ResourceHelpers.resourceFilePath('pacts/zoo_app-animal_service.json'))) } } def setup() { verifier = new ProviderVerifier() } def cleanup() { // cleanup provider state // ie. db.truncateAllTables() } def cleanupSpec() { // cleanup provider } @Unroll def "Provider Pact - With Consumer #consumer"() { expect: verifyConsumerPact(consumer).empty where: consumer << serviceProvider.consumers } private Map verifyConsumerPact(ConsumerInfo consumer) { Map failures = [:] verifier.initialiseReporters(serviceProvider) verifier.runVerificationForConsumer(failures, serviceProvider, consumer) if (!failures.empty) { verifier.displayFailures(failures) } failures } } ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-provider_2.11
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4 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-provider_2.11
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.5.24
Last update 04. November 2018
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 14
Dependencies kotlin-stdlib-jdk8, kotlin-reflect, slf4j-api, groovy-all, kotlin-logging, scala-library, scala-logging_2.11, pact-jvm-model, pact-jvm-pact-broker, pact-jvm-matchers_2.11, commons-io, jansi, httpclient, reflections,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!



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