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osgi-tests from group org.apache.axis2 (version 1.6.3)

Group: org.apache.axis2 Artifact: osgi-tests
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Artifact osgi-tests
Group org.apache.axis2
Version 1.6.3
Last update 27. June 2015
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL http://axis.apache.org/axis2/java/core/
License not specified
Dependencies amount 1
Dependencies axis2-testutils,
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axis2-parent from group org.apache.axis2 (version 1.6.3)

Axis2 is an effort to re-design and totally re-implement both Axis/Java and (eventually) Axis/C++ on a new architecture. Evolving from the now standard "handler chain" model which Axis1 pioneered, Axis2 is developing a more flexible pipeline architecture which can yet be managed and packaged in a more organized manner. This new design acknowledges the maturing of the Web services space in terms of new protocols such as WS-ReliableMessaging, WS-Security and WS-Addressing that are built on top of the base SOAP system. At the time Axis1 was designed, while it was fully expected that other protocols such as WS-ReliableMessaging would be built on top of it, there was not a proper extension architecture defined to enable clean composition of such layers. Thus, one of the key motivations for Axis2 is to provide a clean and simple environment for like Apache Sandesha and Apache WSS4J to layer on top of the base SOAP system. Another driving force for Axis2 as well as the move away from RPC oriented Web services towards more document-oriented, message style asynchronous service interactions. The Axis2 project is centered on a new representation for SOAP messages called AXIOM (AXIs Object Model). AXIOM consists of two parts: a complete XML Infoset representation and a SOAP Infoset representation on top of that. The XML Infoset representation provides a JDOM-like simple API but is built on a deferred model via a StAX-based (Streaming API for XML) pull parsing API. A key feature of AXIOM is that it allows one to stop building the XML tree and just access the pull stream directly; thus enabling both maximum flexibility and maximum performance. This approach allows us to support multiple levels of abstraction for consuming and offering Web services: using plain AXIOM, using generated code and statically data-bound data types and so on. At the time of Axis1's design, RPC-style, synchronous, request-response interactions were the order of the day for Web services. Today service interactions are much more message -oriented and exploit many different message exchange patterns. The Axis2 engine architecture is careful to not build in any assumptions of request-response patterns to ensure that it can be used easily to support arbitrary message exchange patterns.

Group: org.apache.axis2 Artifact: axis2-parent
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Artifact axis2-parent
Group org.apache.axis2
Version 1.6.3
Last update 27. June 2015
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL http://axis.apache.org/axis2/java/core/
License not specified
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
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xapi-gwt-parent from group net.wetheinter (version 0.5)

This is the main aggregator for all gwt submodules. All gwt-specific code resides here. Submodules should avoid inheriting from each other unless necessary. This goes for maven structure and gwt.xml structure. The super module is where our jre emulation layer and super-source live; all modules should inherit super, and a minimum of other modules. Some modules, like injection, are fulfilling an api in the core module, and should be accessed only through core service interfaces. Other modules, like reflection, are capable of being standalone inherits, but can benefit from core utilities like injection, so, two (or more) .gwt.xml modules may be provided. As XApi nears 1.0, all submodules will be routinely stitched together into an uber-jar, in order to have a single jar with a single gwt module that can provide all of the services at once. Internal projects will never use the uber jar, to help maintain modularity, but external projects that want to use more than one service will certainly prefer inheriting one artifact, instead of twelve. When distributed in uber-jar format, it will likely be necessary for either the uber jar, or just xapi-gwt-api.jar to appear before gwt-dev on your compile-time classpath. If using gwt-maven-plugin, the gwtFirstOnClasspath option may become problematic. If so, we will provide a forked gwt-plugin to make sure our compiler enhancements are included in the build process. There is also work going on to make a super-source-everything plugin, which will use maven to find source files, and generate synthetic .gwt.xml for you, as part of an effort to create a wholly unified programming environment. In addition to java-to-javascript, we intend to compile java-to-java and possibly other languages, like go; imagine implementing gwt deferred binding to eliminate cross-platform differences between server environments, or operating systems, or versions of a platform, or anywhere else a core api needs to bind to multiple implementations, depending on the runtime environment.

Group: net.wetheinter Artifact: xapi-gwt-parent
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Artifact xapi-gwt-parent
Group net.wetheinter
Version 0.5
Last update 30. May 2015
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL WeTheInter.net
License not specified
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
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beast-tool from group es.upm.dit.gsi (version 0.9.9)

BEhavioural Agents Simple Testing Tool - BEAST Tool The aim of this project is the development of a system which allows Behavior Driven Development (BDD) in Multi-Agent Systems (MAS), to make testing practices more accessible and intuitive to everybody. In one hand, in order to let tests be writable by newcomers and experts alike, system must allow the redaction of tests in plain text, because client does not need to have knowledge of our code. This plain text will be traduced to software later. The definition of test will be realized with the terminology Given-When-Then, which allows trace an easy guide of the behavior of a given scenario when something happened. In the other hand, due to the complexity of MAS, making unit testing of an agent that needs the interaction with others is almost impossible until the whole system is finished. This implies to leave testing issues to the end of the project, generating big troubles in case of malfunction. Consequently, its necessary to carry out a tool to allow the creation of mock agents and to perform tests during the whole development process. Therefore another objective of our systems is to include a mocking tool which permits testing continuously. Definitively, our tool allows the testing of any MAS in the development process, increasing its modularity and decreasing its elaboration and testing cost. These tests will be written in plain text so that anyone would be able to understand them. For further reading, a paper published in ITMAS2012 workshop can be found in: http://scholar.google.es/citations?view_op=view_citation&hl=es&user=mT3KgXUAAAAJ&citation_for_view=mT3KgXUAAAAJ:Tyk-4Ss8FVUC

Group: es.upm.dit.gsi Artifact: beast-tool
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Artifact beast-tool
Group es.upm.dit.gsi
Version 0.9.9
Last update 03. June 2014
Newest version Yes
Organization Grupo de Sistemas Inteligentes - Universidad Politécnica de Madrid
URL http://www.gsi.dit.upm.es/index.php/es/tecnologia/software/221-beast-tool.html
License GNU General Public License, version 2
Dependencies amount 27
Dependencies mockito-all, junit, maven-surefire-plugin, jbehave-web, jaxme2, jbehave-core, log4j, jadex-kernel-bdibpmn, jadex-kernel-micro, jadex-platform-standalone, jadex-runtimetools, jadex-applications-micro, jadex-bridge, jadex-kernel-base, jadex-kernel-extension-agr, jadex-tools-bdi, jadex-applib-bdi, jadex-kernel-application, jadex-applications-bdibpmn, jadex-applications-bpmn, jadex-applications-gpmn, jadex-kernel-gpmn, jadex-nuggets, jadex-rules-applications, jadex-tools-bpmn, jadex-tools-comanalyzer, jade,
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mahout-eclipse-support from group org.apache.mahout (version 0.5)

Group: org.apache.mahout Artifact: mahout-eclipse-support
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Artifact mahout-eclipse-support
Group org.apache.mahout
Version 0.5
Last update 28. May 2011
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL Not specified
License not specified
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
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mahout-parent from group org.apache.mahout (version 0.3)

Mahout's goal is to build scalable machine learning libraries. With scalable we mean: Scalable to reasonably large data sets. Our core algorithms for clustering, classfication and batch based collaborative filtering are implemented on top of Apache Hadoop using the map/reduce paradigm. However we do not restrict contributions to Hadoop based implementations: Contributions that run on a single node or on a non-Hadoop cluster are welcome as well. The core libraries are highly optimized to allow for good performance also for non-distributed algorithms. Scalable to support your business case. Mahout is distributed under a commercially friendly Apache Software license. Scalable community. The goal of Mahout is to build a vibrant, responsive, diverse community to facilitate discussions not only on the project itself but also on potential use cases. Come to the mailing lists to find out more. Currently Mahout supports mainly four use cases: Recommendation mining takes users' behavior and from that tries to find items users might like. Clustering takes e.g. text documents and groups them into groups of topically related documents. Classification learns from exisiting categorized documents what documents of a specific category look like and is able to assign unlabelled documents to the (hopefully) correct category. Frequent itemset mining takes a set of item groups (terms in a query session, shopping cart content) and identifies, which individual items usually appear together.

Group: org.apache.mahout Artifact: mahout-parent
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Artifact mahout-parent
Group org.apache.mahout
Version 0.3
Last update 12. March 2010
Newest version Yes
Organization The Apache Software Foundation
URL http://lucene.apache.org/mahout
License The Apache Software License, Version 2.0
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-provider-spring_2.12 from group au.com.dius (version 3.6.14)

# Pact Spring/JUnit runner ## Overview Library provides ability to play contract tests against a provider using Spring & JUnit. This library is based on and references the JUnit package, so see the [Pact JUnit 4](../pact-jvm-provider-junit) or [Pact JUnit 5](../pact-jvm-provider-junit5) providers for more details regarding configuration using JUnit. Supports: - Standard ways to load pacts from folders and broker - Easy way to change assertion strategy - Spring Test MockMVC Controllers and ControllerAdvice using MockMvc standalone setup. - MockMvc debugger output - Multiple @State runs to test a particular Provider State multiple times - **au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.State** custom annotation - before each interaction that requires a state change, all methods annotated by `@State` with appropriate the state listed will be invoked. **NOTE:** For publishing provider verification results to a pact broker, make sure the Java system property `pact.provider.version` is set with the version of your provider. ## Example of MockMvc test ```java @RunWith(RestPactRunner.class) // Custom pact runner, child of PactRunner which runs only REST tests @Provider("myAwesomeService") // Set up name of tested provider @PactFolder("pacts") // Point where to find pacts (See also section Pacts source in documentation) public class ContractTest { //Create an instance of your controller. We cannot autowire this as we're not using (and don't want to use) a Spring test runner. @InjectMocks private AwesomeController awesomeController = new AwesomeController(); //Mock your service logic class. We'll use this to create scenarios for respective provider states. @Mock private AwesomeBusinessLogic awesomeBusinessLogic; //Create an instance of your controller advice (if you have one). This will be passed to the MockMvcTarget constructor to be wired up with MockMvc. @InjectMocks private AwesomeControllerAdvice awesomeControllerAdvice = new AwesomeControllerAdvice(); //Create a new instance of the MockMvcTarget and annotate it as the TestTarget for PactRunner @TestTarget public final MockMvcTarget target = new MockMvcTarget(); @Before //Method will be run before each test of interaction public void before() { //initialize your mocks using your mocking framework MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(this); //configure the MockMvcTarget with your controller and controller advice target.setControllers(awesomeController); target.setControllerAdvice(awesomeControllerAdvice); } @State("default", "no-data") // Method will be run before testing interactions that require "default" or "no-data" state public void toDefaultState() { target.setRunTimes(3); //let's loop through this state a few times for a 3 data variants when(awesomeBusinessLogic.getById(any(UUID.class))) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.ONE)) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.TWO)) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.THREE)); } @State("error-case") public void SingleUploadExistsState_Success() { target.setRunTimes(1); //tell the runner to only loop one time for this state //you might want to throw exceptions to be picked off by your controller advice when(awesomeBusinessLogic.getById(any(UUID.class))) .then(i -> { throw new NotCoolException(i.getArgumentAt(0, UUID.class).toString()); }); } } ``` ## Using a Spring runner (version 3.5.7+) You can use `SpringRestPactRunner` instead of the default Pact runner to use the Spring test annotations. This will allow you to inject or mock spring beans. For example: ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("pricing") @PactBroker(protocol = "https", host = "${pactBrokerHost}", port = "443", authentication = @PactBrokerAuth(username = "${pactBrokerUser}", password = "${pactBrokerPassword}")) @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.DEFINED_PORT) public class PricingServiceProviderPactTest { @MockBean private ProductClient productClient; // This will replace the bean with a mock in the application context @TestTarget @SuppressWarnings(value = "VisibilityModifier") public final Target target = new HttpTarget(8091); @State("Product X010000021 exists") public void setupProductX010000021() throws IOException { reset(productClient); ProductBuilder product = new ProductBuilder() .withProductCode("X010000021"); when(productClient.fetch((Set<String>) argThat(contains("X010000021")), any())).thenReturn(product); } @State("the product code X00001 can be priced") public void theProductCodeX00001CanBePriced() throws IOException { reset(productClient); ProductBuilder product = new ProductBuilder() .withProductCode("X00001"); when(productClient.find((Set<String>) argThat(contains("X00001")), any())).thenReturn(product); } } ``` ### Using Spring Context Properties (version 3.5.14+) From version 3.5.14 onwards, the SpringRestPactRunner will look up any annotation expressions (like `${pactBrokerHost}`) above) from the Spring context. For Springboot, this will allow you to define the properties in the application test properties. For instance, if you create the following `application.yml` in the test resources: ```yaml pactbroker: host: "your.broker.local" port: "443" protocol: "https" auth: username: "<your broker username>" password: "<your broker password>" ``` Then you can use the defaults on the `@PactBroker` annotation. ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker( authentication = @PactBrokerAuth(username = "${pactbroker.auth.username}", password = "${pactbroker.auth.password}") ) @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { ``` ### Using a random port with a Springboot test (version 3.5.14+) If you use a random port in a springboot test (by setting `SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT`), you can use the `SpringBootHttpTarget` which will get the application port from the spring application context. For example: ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { @TestTarget public final Target target = new SpringBootHttpTarget(); } ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-provider-spring_2.12
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1 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-provider-spring_2.12
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.6.14
Last update 28. September 2019
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 5
Dependencies pact-jvm-provider-junit_2.12, spring-boot-starter-test, spring-webmvc, javax.servlet-api, jackson-datatype-joda,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-provider-spring_2.11 from group au.com.dius (version 3.5.24)

# Pact Spring/JUnit runner ## Overview Library provides ability to play contract tests against a provider using Spring & JUnit. This library is based on and references the JUnit package, so see [junit provider support](pact-jvm-provider-junit) for more details regarding configuration using JUnit. Supports: - Standard ways to load pacts from folders and broker - Easy way to change assertion strategy - Spring Test MockMVC Controllers and ControllerAdvice using MockMvc standalone setup. - MockMvc debugger output - Multiple @State runs to test a particular Provider State multiple times - **au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.State** custom annotation - before each interaction that requires a state change, all methods annotated by `@State` with appropriate the state listed will be invoked. **NOTE:** For publishing provider verification results to a pact broker, make sure the Java system property `pact.provider.version` is set with the version of your provider. ## Example of MockMvc test ```java @RunWith(RestPactRunner.class) // Custom pact runner, child of PactRunner which runs only REST tests @Provider("myAwesomeService") // Set up name of tested provider @PactFolder("pacts") // Point where to find pacts (See also section Pacts source in documentation) public class ContractTest { //Create an instance of your controller. We cannot autowire this as we're not using (and don't want to use) a Spring test runner. @InjectMocks private AwesomeController awesomeController = new AwesomeController(); //Mock your service logic class. We'll use this to create scenarios for respective provider states. @Mock private AwesomeBusinessLogic awesomeBusinessLogic; //Create an instance of your controller advice (if you have one). This will be passed to the MockMvcTarget constructor to be wired up with MockMvc. @InjectMocks private AwesomeControllerAdvice awesomeControllerAdvice = new AwesomeControllerAdvice(); //Create a new instance of the MockMvcTarget and annotate it as the TestTarget for PactRunner @TestTarget public final MockMvcTarget target = new MockMvcTarget(); @Before //Method will be run before each test of interaction public void before() { //initialize your mocks using your mocking framework MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(this); //configure the MockMvcTarget with your controller and controller advice target.setControllers(awesomeController); target.setControllerAdvice(awesomeControllerAdvice); } @State("default", "no-data") // Method will be run before testing interactions that require "default" or "no-data" state public void toDefaultState() { target.setRunTimes(3); //let's loop through this state a few times for a 3 data variants when(awesomeBusinessLogic.getById(any(UUID.class))) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.ONE)) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.TWO)) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.THREE)); } @State("error-case") public void SingleUploadExistsState_Success() { target.setRunTimes(1); //tell the runner to only loop one time for this state //you might want to throw exceptions to be picked off by your controller advice when(awesomeBusinessLogic.getById(any(UUID.class))) .then(i -> { throw new NotCoolException(i.getArgumentAt(0, UUID.class).toString()); }); } } ``` ## Using a Spring runner (version 3.5.7+) You can use `SpringRestPactRunner` instead of the default Pact runner to use the Spring test annotations. This will allow you to inject or mock spring beans. For example: ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("pricing") @PactBroker(protocol = "https", host = "${pactBrokerHost}", port = "443", authentication = @PactBrokerAuth(username = "${pactBrokerUser}", password = "${pactBrokerPassword}")) @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.DEFINED_PORT) public class PricingServiceProviderPactTest { @MockBean private ProductClient productClient; // This will replace the bean with a mock in the application context @TestTarget @SuppressWarnings(value = "VisibilityModifier") public final Target target = new HttpTarget(8091); @State("Product X010000021 exists") public void setupProductX010000021() throws IOException { reset(productClient); ProductBuilder product = new ProductBuilder() .withProductCode("X010000021"); when(productClient.fetch((Set<String>) argThat(contains("X010000021")), any())).thenReturn(product); } @State("the product code X00001 can be priced") public void theProductCodeX00001CanBePriced() throws IOException { reset(productClient); ProductBuilder product = new ProductBuilder() .withProductCode("X00001"); when(productClient.find((Set<String>) argThat(contains("X00001")), any())).thenReturn(product); } } ``` ### Using Spring Context Properties (version 3.5.14+) From version 3.5.14 onwards, the SpringRestPactRunner will look up any annotation expressions (like `${pactBrokerHost}`) above) from the Spring context. For Springboot, this will allow you to define the properties in the application test properties. For instance, if you create the following `application.yml` in the test resources: ```yaml pactbroker: host: "your.broker.local" port: "443" protocol: "https" auth: username: "<your broker username>" password: "<your broker password>" ``` Then you can use the defaults on the `@PactBroker` annotation. ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker( authentication = @PactBrokerAuth(username = "${pactbroker.auth.username}", password = "${pactbroker.auth.password}") ) @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { ``` ### Using a random port with a Springboot test (version 3.5.14+) If you use a random port in a springboot test (by setting `SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT`), you can use the `SpringBootHttpTarget` which will get the application port from the spring application context. For example: ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { @TestTarget public final Target target = new SpringBootHttpTarget(); } ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-provider-spring_2.11
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2 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-provider-spring_2.11
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.5.24
Last update 04. November 2018
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 13
Dependencies kotlin-stdlib-jdk8, kotlin-reflect, slf4j-api, groovy-all, kotlin-logging, scala-library, scala-logging_2.11, pact-jvm-provider-junit_2.11, spring-boot-starter-test, spring-web, spring-webmvc, javax.servlet-api, jackson-datatype-joda,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-provider-spring from group au.com.dius (version 4.0.8)

# Pact Spring/JUnit runner ## Overview Library provides ability to play contract tests against a provider using Spring & JUnit. This library is based on and references the JUnit package, so see the [Pact JUnit 4](../pact-jvm-provider-junit) or [Pact JUnit 5](../pact-jvm-provider-junit5) providers for more details regarding configuration using JUnit. Supports: - Standard ways to load pacts from folders and broker - Easy way to change assertion strategy - Spring Test MockMVC Controllers and ControllerAdvice using MockMvc standalone setup. - MockMvc debugger output - Multiple @State runs to test a particular Provider State multiple times - **au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.State** custom annotation - before each interaction that requires a state change, all methods annotated by `@State` with appropriate the state listed will be invoked. **NOTE:** For publishing provider verification results to a pact broker, make sure the Java system property `pact.provider.version` is set with the version of your provider. ## Example of MockMvc test ```java @RunWith(RestPactRunner.class) // Custom pact runner, child of PactRunner which runs only REST tests @Provider("myAwesomeService") // Set up name of tested provider @PactFolder("pacts") // Point where to find pacts (See also section Pacts source in documentation) public class ContractTest { //Create an instance of your controller. We cannot autowire this as we're not using (and don't want to use) a Spring test runner. @InjectMocks private AwesomeController awesomeController = new AwesomeController(); //Mock your service logic class. We'll use this to create scenarios for respective provider states. @Mock private AwesomeBusinessLogic awesomeBusinessLogic; //Create an instance of your controller advice (if you have one). This will be passed to the MockMvcTarget constructor to be wired up with MockMvc. @InjectMocks private AwesomeControllerAdvice awesomeControllerAdvice = new AwesomeControllerAdvice(); //Create a new instance of the MockMvcTarget and annotate it as the TestTarget for PactRunner @TestTarget public final MockMvcTarget target = new MockMvcTarget(); @Before //Method will be run before each test of interaction public void before() { //initialize your mocks using your mocking framework MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(this); //configure the MockMvcTarget with your controller and controller advice target.setControllers(awesomeController); target.setControllerAdvice(awesomeControllerAdvice); } @State("default", "no-data") // Method will be run before testing interactions that require "default" or "no-data" state public void toDefaultState() { target.setRunTimes(3); //let's loop through this state a few times for a 3 data variants when(awesomeBusinessLogic.getById(any(UUID.class))) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.ONE)) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.TWO)) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.THREE)); } @State("error-case") public void SingleUploadExistsState_Success() { target.setRunTimes(1); //tell the runner to only loop one time for this state //you might want to throw exceptions to be picked off by your controller advice when(awesomeBusinessLogic.getById(any(UUID.class))) .then(i -> { throw new NotCoolException(i.getArgumentAt(0, UUID.class).toString()); }); } } ``` ## Using Spring runners You can use `SpringRestPactRunner` or `SpringMessagePactRunner` instead of the default Pact runner to use the Spring test annotations. This will allow you to inject or mock spring beans. `SpringRestPactRunner` is for restful webapps and `SpringMessagePactRunner` is for async message tests. For example: ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("pricing") @PactBroker(protocol = "https", host = "${pactBrokerHost}", port = "443", authentication = @PactBrokerAuth(username = "${pactBrokerUser}", password = "${pactBrokerPassword}")) @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.DEFINED_PORT) public class PricingServiceProviderPactTest { @MockBean private ProductClient productClient; // This will replace the bean with a mock in the application context @TestTarget @SuppressWarnings(value = "VisibilityModifier") public final Target target = new HttpTarget(8091); @State("Product X010000021 exists") public void setupProductX010000021() throws IOException { reset(productClient); ProductBuilder product = new ProductBuilder() .withProductCode("X010000021"); when(productClient.fetch((Set<String>) argThat(contains("X010000021")), any())).thenReturn(product); } @State("the product code X00001 can be priced") public void theProductCodeX00001CanBePriced() throws IOException { reset(productClient); ProductBuilder product = new ProductBuilder() .withProductCode("X00001"); when(productClient.find((Set<String>) argThat(contains("X00001")), any())).thenReturn(product); } } ``` ### Using Spring Context Properties The SpringRestPactRunner will look up any annotation expressions (like `${pactBrokerHost}`) above) from the Spring context. For Springboot, this will allow you to define the properties in the application test properties. For instance, if you create the following `application.yml` in the test resources: ```yaml pactbroker: host: "your.broker.local" port: "443" protocol: "https" auth: username: "<your broker username>" password: "<your broker password>" ``` Then you can use the defaults on the `@PactBroker` annotation. ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker( authentication = @PactBrokerAuth(username = "${pactbroker.auth.username}", password = "${pactbroker.auth.password}") ) @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { ``` ### Using a random port with a Springboot test If you use a random port in a springboot test (by setting `SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT`), you need to set it to the `TestTarget`. How this works is different for JUnit4 and JUnit5. #### JUnit4 You can use the `SpringBootHttpTarget` which will get the application port from the spring application context. For example: ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { @TestTarget public final Target target = new SpringBootHttpTarget(); } ``` #### JUnit5 You actually don't need to dependend on `pact-jvm-provider-spring` for this. It's sufficient to depend on `pact-jvm-provider-junit5`. You can set the port to the `HttpTestTarget` object in the before method. ```java @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { @LocalServerPort private int port; @BeforeEach void before(PactVerificationContext context) { context.setTarget(new HttpTestTarget("localhost", port)); } } ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-provider-spring
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0 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-provider-spring
Group au.com.dius
Version 4.0.8
Last update 22. March 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 5
Dependencies spring-boot-starter-test, spring-webmvc, javax.servlet-api, jackson-datatype-joda, pact-jvm-provider-junit,
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pact-jvm-consumer_2.10 from group au.com.dius (version 2.4.20)

Pact consumer ============= Pact Consumer is used by projects that are consumers of an API. Most projects will want to use pact-consumer via one of the test framework specific projects. If your favourite framework is not implemented, this module should give you all the hooks you need. Provides a DSL for use with Java to build consumer pacts. ## Dependency The library is available on maven central using: * group-id = `au.com.dius` * artifact-id = `pact-jvm-consumer_2.11` ## DSL Usage Example in a JUnit test: ```java import au.com.dius.pact.model.MockProviderConfig; import au.com.dius.pact.model.PactFragment; import org.junit.Test; import java.io.IOException; import java.util.HashMap; import java.util.Map; import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals; public class PactTest { @Test public void testPact() { PactFragment pactFragment = ConsumerPactBuilder .consumer("Some Consumer") .hasPactWith("Some Provider") .uponReceiving("a request to say Hello") .path("/hello") .method("POST") .body("{\"name\": \"harry\"}") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"hello\": \"harry\"}") .toFragment(); MockProviderConfig config = MockProviderConfig.createDefault(); VerificationResult result = pactFragment.runConsumer(config, new TestRun() { @Override public void run(MockProviderConfig config) { Map expectedResponse = new HashMap(); expectedResponse.put("hello", "harry"); try { assertEquals(new ProviderClient(config.url()).hello("{\"name\": \"harry\"}"), expectedResponse); } catch (IOException e) {} } }); if (result instanceof PactError) { throw new RuntimeException(((PactError)result).error()); } assertEquals(ConsumerPactTest.PACT_VERIFIED, result); } } ``` The DSL has the following pattern: ```java .consumer("Some Consumer") .hasPactWith("Some Provider") .given("a certain state on the provider") .uponReceiving("a request for something") .path("/hello") .method("POST") .body("{\"name\": \"harry\"}") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"hello\": \"harry\"}") .uponReceiving("another request for something") .path("/hello") .method("POST") .body("{\"name\": \"harry\"}") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"hello\": \"harry\"}") . . . .toFragment() ``` You can define as many interactions as required. Each interaction starts with `uponReceiving` followed by `willRespondWith`. The test state setup with `given` is a mechanism to describe what the state of the provider should be in before the provider is verified. It is only recorded in the consumer tests and used by the provider verification tasks. ### Building JSON bodies with PactDslJsonBody DSL The body method of the ConsumerPactBuilder can accept a PactDslJsonBody, which can construct a JSON body as well as define regex and type matchers. For example: ```java PactDslJsonBody body = new PactDslJsonBody() .stringType("name") .booleanType("happy") .hexValue("hexCode") .id() .ipAddress("localAddress") .numberValue("age", 100) .timestamp(); ``` #### DSL Matching methods The following matching methods are provided with the DSL. In most cases, they take an optional value parameter which will be used to generate example values (i.e. when returning a mock response). If no example value is given, a random one will be generated. | method | description | |--------|-------------| | string, stringValue | Match a string value (using string equality) | | number, numberValue | Match a number value (using Number.equals)\* | | booleanValue | Match a boolean value (using equality) | | stringType | Will match all Strings | | numberType | Will match all numbers\* | | integerType | Will match all numbers that are integers (both ints and longs)\* | | decimalType | Will match all real numbers (floating point and decimal)\* | | booleanType | Will match all boolean values (true and false) | | stringMatcher | Will match strings using the provided regular expression | | timestamp | Will match string containing timestamps. If a timestamp format is not given, will match an ISO timestamp format | | date | Will match string containing dates. If a date format is not given, will match an ISO date format | | time | Will match string containing times. If a time format is not given, will match an ISO time format | | ipAddress | Will match string containing IP4 formatted address. | | id | Will match all numbers by type | | hexValue | Will match all hexadecimal encoded strings | | uuid | Will match strings containing UUIDs | _\* Note:_ JSON only supports double precision floating point values. Depending on the language implementation, they may parsed as integer, floating point or decimal numbers. #### Ensuring all items in a list match an example (2.2.0+) Lots of the time you might not know the number of items that will be in a list, but you want to ensure that the list has a minimum or maximum size and that each item in the list matches a given example. You can do this with the `arrayLike`, `minArrayLike` and `maxArrayLike` functions. | function | description | |----------|-------------| | `eachLike` | Ensure that each item in the list matches the provided example | | `maxArrayLike` | Ensure that each item in the list matches the provided example and the list is no bigger than the provided max | | `minArrayLike` | Ensure that each item in the list matches the provided example and the list is no smaller than the provided min | For example: ```java DslPart body = new PactDslJsonBody() .minArrayLike("users") .id() .stringType("name") .closeObject() .closeArray(); ``` This will ensure that the users list is never empty and that each user has an identifier that is a number and a name that is a string. #### Matching JSON values at the root (Version 3.2.2/2.4.3+) For cases where you are expecting basic JSON values (strings, numbers, booleans and null) at the root level of the body and need to use matchers, you can use the `PactDslJsonRootValue` class. It has all the DSL matching methods for basic values that you can use. For example: ```java .consumer("Some Consumer") .hasPactWith("Some Provider") .uponReceiving("a request for a basic JSON value") .path("/hello") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body(PactDslJsonRootValue.integerType()) ``` #### Root level arrays that match all items (version 2.2.11+) If the root of the body is an array, you can create PactDslJsonArray classes with the following methods: | function | description | |----------|-------------| | `arrayEachLike` | Ensure that each item in the list matches the provided example | | `arrayMinLike` | Ensure that each item in the list matches the provided example and the list is no bigger than the provided max | | `arrayMaxLike` | Ensure that each item in the list matches the provided example and the list is no smaller than the provided min | For example: ```java PactDslJsonArray.arrayEachLike() .date("clearedDate", "mm/dd/yyyy", date) .stringType("status", "STATUS") .decimalType("amount", 100.0) .closeObject() ``` This will then match a body like: ```json [ { "clearedDate" : "07/22/2015", "status" : "C", "amount" : 15.0 }, { "clearedDate" : "07/22/2015", "status" : "C", "amount" : 15.0 }, { "clearedDate" : "07/22/2015", "status" : "C", "amount" : 15.0 } ] ``` #### Matching arrays of arrays (version 3.2.12/2.4.14+) For the case where you have arrays of arrays (GeoJSON is an example), the following methods have been provided: | function | description | |----------|-------------| | `eachArrayLike` | Ensure that each item in the array is an array that matches the provided example | | `eachArrayWithMaxLike` | Ensure that each item in the array is an array that matches the provided example and the array is no bigger than the provided max | | `eachArrayWithMinLike` | Ensure that each item in the array is an array that matches the provided example and the array is no smaller than the provided min | For example (with GeoJSON structure): ```java new PactDslJsonBody() .stringType("type","FeatureCollection") .eachLike("features") .stringType("type","Feature") .object("geometry") .stringType("type","Point") .eachArrayLike("coordinates") // coordinates is an array of arrays .decimalType(-7.55717) .decimalType(49.766896) .closeArray() .closeArray() .closeObject() .object("properties") .stringType("prop0","value0") .closeObject() .closeObject() .closeArray() ``` This generated the following JSON: ```json { "features": [ { "geometry": { "coordinates": [[-7.55717, 49.766896]], "type": "Point" }, "type": "Feature", "properties": { "prop0": "value0" } } ], "type": "FeatureCollection" } ``` and will be able to match all coordinates regardless of the number of coordinates. #### Matching any key in a map (3.3.1/2.5.0+) The DSL has been extended for cases where the keys in a map are IDs. For an example of this, see [#313](https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm/issues/131). In this case you can use the `eachKeyLike` method, which takes an example key as a parameter. For example: ```java DslPart body = new PactDslJsonBody() .object("one") .eachKeyLike("001", PactDslJsonRootValue.id(12345L)) // key like an id mapped to a matcher .closeObject() .object("two") .eachKeyLike("001-A") // key like an id where the value is matched by the following example .stringType("description", "Some Description") .closeObject() .closeObject() .object("three") .eachKeyMappedToAnArrayLike("001") // key like an id mapped to an array where each item is matched by the following example .id("someId", 23456L) .closeObject() .closeArray() .closeObject(); ``` For an example, have a look at [WildcardKeysTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/WildcardKeysTest.java). **NOTE:** The `eachKeyLike` method adds a `*` to the matching path, so the matching definition will be applied to all keys of the map if there is not a more specific matcher defined for a particular key. Having more than one `eachKeyLike` condition applied to a map will result in only one being applied when the pact is verified (probably the last). ### Matching on paths (version 2.1.5+) You can use regular expressions to match incoming requests. The DSL has a `matchPath` method for this. You can provide a real path as a second value to use when generating requests, and if you leave it out it will generate a random one from the regular expression. For example: ```java .given("test state") .uponReceiving("a test interaction") .matchPath("/transaction/[0-9]+") // or .matchPath("/transaction/[0-9]+", "/transaction/1234567890") .method("POST") .body("{\"name\": \"harry\"}") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"hello\": \"harry\"}") ``` ### Matching on headers (version 2.2.2+) You can use regular expressions to match request and response headers. The DSL has a `matchHeader` method for this. You can provide an example header value to use when generating requests and responses, and if you leave it out it will generate a random one from the regular expression. For example: ```java .given("test state") .uponReceiving("a test interaction") .path("/hello") .method("POST") .matchHeader("testreqheader", "test.*value") .body("{\"name\": \"harry\"}") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"hello\": \"harry\"}") .matchHeader("Location", ".*/hello/[0-9]+", "/hello/1234") ``` ### Matching on query parameters (version 3.3.7+) You can use regular expressions to match request query parameters. The DSL has a `matchQuery` method for this. You can provide an example value to use when generating requests, and if you leave it out it will generate a random one from the regular expression. For example: ```java .given("test state") .uponReceiving("a test interaction") .path("/hello") .method("POST") .matchQuery("a", "\\d+", "100") .matchQuery("b", "[A-Z]", "X") .body("{\"name\": \"harry\"}") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"hello\": \"harry\"}") ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-consumer_2.10
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6 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-consumer_2.10
Group au.com.dius
Version 2.4.20
Last update 14. April 2018
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 12
Dependencies slf4j-api, scala-library, pact-jvm-model, pact-jvm-matchers_2.10, groovy-all, diffutils, automaton, httpclient, jackson-databind, generex, unfiltered-netty-server_2.10, dispatch-core_2.10,
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