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chips-n-salsa from group org.cicirello (version 5.0.0)

Chips-n-Salsa is a Java library of customizable, hybridizable, iterative, parallel, stochastic, and self-adaptive local search algorithms. The library includes implementations of several stochastic local search algorithms, including simulated annealing, hill climbers, as well as constructive search algorithms such as stochastic sampling. Chips-n-Salsa now also includes genetic algorithms as well as evolutionary algorithms more generally. The library very extensively supports simulated annealing. It includes several classes for representing solutions to a variety of optimization problems. For example, the library includes a BitVector class that implements vectors of bits, as well as classes for representing solutions to problems where we are searching for an optimal vector of integers or reals. For each of the built-in representations, the library provides the most common mutation operators for generating random neighbors of candidate solutions, as well as common crossover operators for use with evolutionary algorithms. Additionally, the library provides extensive support for permutation optimization problems, including implementations of many different mutation operators for permutations, and utilizing the efficiently implemented Permutation class of the JavaPermutationTools (JPT) library. Chips-n-Salsa is customizable, making extensive use of Java's generic types, enabling using the library to optimize other types of representations beyond what is provided in the library. It is hybridizable, providing support for integrating multiple forms of local search (e.g., using a hill climber on a solution generated by simulated annealing), creating hybrid mutation operators (e.g., local search using multiple mutation operators), as well as support for running more than one type of search for the same problem concurrently using multiple threads as a form of algorithm portfolio. Chips-n-Salsa is iterative, with support for multistart metaheuristics, including implementations of several restart schedules for varying the run lengths across the restarts. It also supports parallel execution of multiple instances of the same, or different, stochastic local search algorithms for an instance of a problem to accelerate the search process. The library supports self-adaptive search in a variety of ways, such as including implementations of adaptive annealing schedules for simulated annealing, such as the Modified Lam schedule, implementations of the simpler annealing schedules but which self-tune the initial temperature and other parameters, and restart schedules that adapt to run length.

Group: org.cicirello Artifact: chips-n-salsa
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Artifact chips-n-salsa
Group org.cicirello
Version 5.0.0
Last update 03. June 2022
Organization Cicirello.Org
URL https://chips-n-salsa.cicirello.org/
License GPL-3.0-or-later
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
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pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.11 from group au.com.dius (version 3.5.24)

pact-jvm-consumer-junit5 ======================== JUnit 5 support for Pact consumer tests ## Dependency The library is available on maven central using: * group-id = `au.com.dius` * artifact-id = `pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.12` * version-id = `3.5.x` ## Usage ### 1. Add the Pact consumer test extension to the test class. To write Pact consumer tests with JUnit 5, you need to add `@ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt)` to your test class. This replaces the `PactRunner` used for JUnit 4 tests. The rest of the test follows a similar pattern as for JUnit 4 tests. ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` ### 2. create a method annotated with `@Pact` that returns the interactions for the test For each test (as with JUnit 4), you need to define a method annotated with the `@Pact` annotation that returns the interactions for the test. ```java @Pact(provider="test_provider", consumer="test_consumer") public RequestResponsePact createPact(PactDslWithProvider builder) { return builder .given("test state") .uponReceiving("ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest test interaction") .path("/") .method("GET") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"responsetest\": true}") .toPact(); } ``` ### 3. Link the mock server with the interactions for the test with `@PactTestFor` Then the final step is to use the `@PactTestFor` annotation to tell the Pact extension how to setup the Pact test. You can either put this annotation on the test class, or on the test method. For examples see [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) and [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy). The `@PactTestFor` annotation allows you to control the mock server in the same way as the JUnit 4 `PactProviderRule`. It allows you to set the hostname to bind to (default is `localhost`) and the port (default is to use a random port). You can also set the Pact specification version to use (default is V3). ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) @PactTestFor(providerName = "ArticlesProvider", port = "1234") public class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` **NOTE on the hostname**: The mock server runs in the same JVM as the test, so the only valid values for hostname are: | hostname | result | | -------- | ------ | | `localhost` | binds to the address that localhost points to (normally the loopback adapter) | | `127.0.0.1` or `::1` | binds to the loopback adapter | | host name | binds to the default interface that the host machines DNS name resolves to | | `0.0.0.0` or `::` | binds to the all interfaces on the host machine | #### Matching the interactions by provider name If you set the `providerName` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the first method with a `@Pact` annotation with the same provider name will be used. See [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) for an example. #### Matching the interactions by method name If you set the `pactMethod` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the method with the provided name will be used (it still needs a `@Pact` annotation). See [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy) for an example. ### Injecting the mock server into the test You can get the mock server injected into the test method by adding a `MockServer` parameter to the test method. ```java @Test void test(MockServer mockServer) { HttpResponse httpResponse = Request.Get(mockServer.getUrl() + "/articles.json").execute().returnResponse(); assertThat(httpResponse.getStatusLine().getStatusCode(), is(equalTo(200))); } ``` This helps with getting the base URL of the mock server, especially when a random port is used. ## Unsupported The current implementation does not support tests with multiple providers. This will be added in a later release.

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.11
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Artifact pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.11
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.5.24
Last update 04. November 2018
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 9
Dependencies kotlin-stdlib-jdk8, kotlin-reflect, slf4j-api, groovy-all, kotlin-logging, scala-library, scala-logging_2.11, pact-jvm-consumer_2.11, junit-jupiter-api,
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spring from group au.com.dius.pact.provider (version 4.4.0-beta.2)

# Pact Spring/JUnit runner ## Overview Library provides ability to play contract tests against a provider using Spring & JUnit. This library is based on and references the JUnit package, so see the [Pact JUnit 4](/provider/junit/README.md) or [Pact JUnit 5](/provider/junit5/README.md) providers for more details regarding configuration using JUnit. Supports: - Standard ways to load pacts from folders and broker - Easy way to change assertion strategy - Spring Test MockMVC Controllers and ControllerAdvice using MockMvc standalone setup. - MockMvc debugger output - Spring WebFlux Controllers and RouterFunctions - Multiple @State runs to test a particular Provider State multiple times - **au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.State** custom annotation - before each interaction that requires a state change, all methods annotated by `@State` with appropriate the state listed will be invoked. **NOTE:** For publishing provider verification results to a pact broker, make sure the Java system property `pact.provider.version` is set with the version of your provider. ## Example of MockMvc test ```java @RunWith(RestPactRunner.class) // Custom pact runner, child of PactRunner which runs only REST tests @Provider("myAwesomeService") // Set up name of tested provider @PactFolder("pacts") // Point where to find pacts (See also section Pacts source in documentation) public class ContractTest { //Create an instance of your controller. We cannot autowire this as we're not using (and don't want to use) a Spring test runner. @InjectMocks private AwesomeController awesomeController = new AwesomeController(); //Mock your service logic class. We'll use this to create scenarios for respective provider states. @Mock private AwesomeBusinessLogic awesomeBusinessLogic; //Create an instance of your controller advice (if you have one). This will be passed to the MockMvcTarget constructor to be wired up with MockMvc. @InjectMocks private AwesomeControllerAdvice awesomeControllerAdvice = new AwesomeControllerAdvice(); //Create a new instance of the MockMvcTarget and annotate it as the TestTarget for PactRunner @TestTarget public final MockMvcTarget target = new MockMvcTarget(); @Before //Method will be run before each test of interaction public void before() { //initialize your mocks using your mocking framework MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(this); //configure the MockMvcTarget with your controller and controller advice target.setControllers(awesomeController); target.setControllerAdvice(awesomeControllerAdvice); } @State("default", "no-data") // Method will be run before testing interactions that require "default" or "no-data" state public void toDefaultState() { target.setRunTimes(3); //let's loop through this state a few times for a 3 data variants when(awesomeBusinessLogic.getById(any(UUID.class))) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.ONE)) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.TWO)) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.THREE)); } @State("error-case") public void SingleUploadExistsState_Success() { target.setRunTimes(1); //tell the runner to only loop one time for this state //you might want to throw exceptions to be picked off by your controller advice when(awesomeBusinessLogic.getById(any(UUID.class))) .then(i -> { throw new NotCoolException(i.getArgumentAt(0, UUID.class).toString()); }); } } ``` ## Example of Spring WebFlux test ```java @RunWith(RestPactRunner.class) // Custom pact runner, child of PactRunner which runs only REST tests @Provider("myAwesomeService") // Set up name of tested provider @PactFolder("pacts") // Point where to find pacts (See also section Pacts source in documentation) public class AwesomeRouterContractTest { //Create a new instance of the WebFluxTarget and annotate it as the TestTarget for PactRunner @TestTarget public WebFluxTarget target = new WebFluxTarget(); //Create instance of your RouterFunction public RouterFunction<ServerResponse> routerFunction = new AwesomeRouter(new AwesomeHandler()).routes(); //Configure the WebFluxTarget with routerFunction @Before public void setup() { target.setRouterFunction(routerFunction); } } ``` ## Using Spring runners You can use `SpringRestPactRunner` or `SpringMessagePactRunner` instead of the default Pact runner to use the Spring test annotations. This will allow you to inject or mock spring beans. `SpringRestPactRunner` is for restful webapps and `SpringMessagePactRunner` is for async message tests. For example: ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("pricing") @PactBroker(protocol = "https", host = "${pactBrokerHost}", port = "443", authentication = @PactBrokerAuth(username = "${pactBrokerUser}", password = "${pactBrokerPassword}")) @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.DEFINED_PORT) public class PricingServiceProviderPactTest { @MockBean private ProductClient productClient; // This will replace the bean with a mock in the application context @TestTarget @SuppressWarnings(value = "VisibilityModifier") public final Target target = new HttpTarget(8091); @State("Product X010000021 exists") public void setupProductX010000021() throws IOException { reset(productClient); ProductBuilder product = new ProductBuilder() .withProductCode("X010000021"); when(productClient.fetch((Set<String>) argThat(contains("X010000021")), any())).thenReturn(product); } @State("the product code X00001 can be priced") public void theProductCodeX00001CanBePriced() throws IOException { reset(productClient); ProductBuilder product = new ProductBuilder() .withProductCode("X00001"); when(productClient.find((Set<String>) argThat(contains("X00001")), any())).thenReturn(product); } } ``` ### Using Spring Context Properties The SpringRestPactRunner will look up any annotation expressions (like `${pactBrokerHost}`) above) from the Spring context. For Springboot, this will allow you to define the properties in the application test properties. For instance, if you create the following `application.yml` in the test resources: ```yaml pactbroker: host: "your.broker.local" port: "443" protocol: "https" auth: username: "<your broker username>" password: "<your broker password>" ``` Then you can use the defaults on the `@PactBroker` annotation. ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker( authentication = @PactBrokerAuth(username = "${pactbroker.auth.username}", password = "${pactbroker.auth.password}") ) @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { ``` ### Using a random port with a Springboot test If you use a random port in a springboot test (by setting `SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT`), you need to set it to the `TestTarget`. How this works is different for JUnit4 and JUnit5. #### JUnit4 You can use the `SpringBootHttpTarget` which will get the application port from the spring application context. For example: ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { @TestTarget public final Target target = new SpringBootHttpTarget(); } ``` #### JUnit5 You actually don't need to dependend on `pact-jvm-provider-spring` for this. It's sufficient to depend on `pact-jvm-provider-junit5`. You can set the port to the `HttpTestTarget` object in the before method. ```java @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { @LocalServerPort private int port; @BeforeEach void before(PactVerificationContext context) { context.setTarget(new HttpTestTarget("localhost", port)); } } ``` # Verifying V4 Pact files that require plugins (version 4.3.0+) Pact files that require plugins can be verified with version 4.3.0+. For details on how plugins work, see the [Pact plugin project](https://github.com/pact-foundation/pact-plugins). Each required plugin is defined in the `plugins` section in the Pact metadata in the Pact file. The plugins will be loaded from the plugin directory. By default, this is `~/.pact/plugins` or the value of the `PACT_PLUGIN_DIR` environment variable. Each plugin required by the Pact file must be installed there. You will need to follow the installation instructions for each plugin, but the default is to unpack the plugin into a sub-directory `<plugin-name>-<plugin-version>` (i.e., for the Protobuf plugin 0.0.0 it will be `protobuf-0.0.0`). The plugin manifest file must be present for the plugin to be able to be loaded. # Test Analytics We are tracking anonymous analytics to gather important usage statistics like JVM version and operating system. To disable tracking, set the 'pact_do_not_track' system property or environment variable to 'true'.

Group: au.com.dius.pact.provider Artifact: spring
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Artifact spring
Group au.com.dius.pact.provider
Version 4.4.0-beta.2
Last update 27. April 2022
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 1
Dependencies junit,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-provider-spring from group au.com.dius (version 4.0.10)

# Pact Spring/JUnit runner ## Overview Library provides ability to play contract tests against a provider using Spring & JUnit. This library is based on and references the JUnit package, so see the [Pact JUnit 4](../pact-jvm-provider-junit) or [Pact JUnit 5](../pact-jvm-provider-junit5) providers for more details regarding configuration using JUnit. Supports: - Standard ways to load pacts from folders and broker - Easy way to change assertion strategy - Spring Test MockMVC Controllers and ControllerAdvice using MockMvc standalone setup. - MockMvc debugger output - Multiple @State runs to test a particular Provider State multiple times - **au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.State** custom annotation - before each interaction that requires a state change, all methods annotated by `@State` with appropriate the state listed will be invoked. **NOTE:** For publishing provider verification results to a pact broker, make sure the Java system property `pact.provider.version` is set with the version of your provider. ## Example of MockMvc test ```java @RunWith(RestPactRunner.class) // Custom pact runner, child of PactRunner which runs only REST tests @Provider("myAwesomeService") // Set up name of tested provider @PactFolder("pacts") // Point where to find pacts (See also section Pacts source in documentation) public class ContractTest { //Create an instance of your controller. We cannot autowire this as we're not using (and don't want to use) a Spring test runner. @InjectMocks private AwesomeController awesomeController = new AwesomeController(); //Mock your service logic class. We'll use this to create scenarios for respective provider states. @Mock private AwesomeBusinessLogic awesomeBusinessLogic; //Create an instance of your controller advice (if you have one). This will be passed to the MockMvcTarget constructor to be wired up with MockMvc. @InjectMocks private AwesomeControllerAdvice awesomeControllerAdvice = new AwesomeControllerAdvice(); //Create a new instance of the MockMvcTarget and annotate it as the TestTarget for PactRunner @TestTarget public final MockMvcTarget target = new MockMvcTarget(); @Before //Method will be run before each test of interaction public void before() { //initialize your mocks using your mocking framework MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(this); //configure the MockMvcTarget with your controller and controller advice target.setControllers(awesomeController); target.setControllerAdvice(awesomeControllerAdvice); } @State("default", "no-data") // Method will be run before testing interactions that require "default" or "no-data" state public void toDefaultState() { target.setRunTimes(3); //let's loop through this state a few times for a 3 data variants when(awesomeBusinessLogic.getById(any(UUID.class))) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.ONE)) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.TWO)) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.THREE)); } @State("error-case") public void SingleUploadExistsState_Success() { target.setRunTimes(1); //tell the runner to only loop one time for this state //you might want to throw exceptions to be picked off by your controller advice when(awesomeBusinessLogic.getById(any(UUID.class))) .then(i -> { throw new NotCoolException(i.getArgumentAt(0, UUID.class).toString()); }); } } ``` ## Using Spring runners You can use `SpringRestPactRunner` or `SpringMessagePactRunner` instead of the default Pact runner to use the Spring test annotations. This will allow you to inject or mock spring beans. `SpringRestPactRunner` is for restful webapps and `SpringMessagePactRunner` is for async message tests. For example: ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("pricing") @PactBroker(protocol = "https", host = "${pactBrokerHost}", port = "443", authentication = @PactBrokerAuth(username = "${pactBrokerUser}", password = "${pactBrokerPassword}")) @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.DEFINED_PORT) public class PricingServiceProviderPactTest { @MockBean private ProductClient productClient; // This will replace the bean with a mock in the application context @TestTarget @SuppressWarnings(value = "VisibilityModifier") public final Target target = new HttpTarget(8091); @State("Product X010000021 exists") public void setupProductX010000021() throws IOException { reset(productClient); ProductBuilder product = new ProductBuilder() .withProductCode("X010000021"); when(productClient.fetch((Set<String>) argThat(contains("X010000021")), any())).thenReturn(product); } @State("the product code X00001 can be priced") public void theProductCodeX00001CanBePriced() throws IOException { reset(productClient); ProductBuilder product = new ProductBuilder() .withProductCode("X00001"); when(productClient.find((Set<String>) argThat(contains("X00001")), any())).thenReturn(product); } } ``` ### Using Spring Context Properties The SpringRestPactRunner will look up any annotation expressions (like `${pactBrokerHost}`) above) from the Spring context. For Springboot, this will allow you to define the properties in the application test properties. For instance, if you create the following `application.yml` in the test resources: ```yaml pactbroker: host: "your.broker.local" port: "443" protocol: "https" auth: username: "<your broker username>" password: "<your broker password>" ``` Then you can use the defaults on the `@PactBroker` annotation. ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker( authentication = @PactBrokerAuth(username = "${pactbroker.auth.username}", password = "${pactbroker.auth.password}") ) @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { ``` ### Using a random port with a Springboot test If you use a random port in a springboot test (by setting `SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT`), you need to set it to the `TestTarget`. How this works is different for JUnit4 and JUnit5. #### JUnit4 You can use the `SpringBootHttpTarget` which will get the application port from the spring application context. For example: ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { @TestTarget public final Target target = new SpringBootHttpTarget(); } ``` #### JUnit5 You actually don't need to dependend on `pact-jvm-provider-spring` for this. It's sufficient to depend on `pact-jvm-provider-junit5`. You can set the port to the `HttpTestTarget` object in the before method. ```java @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { @LocalServerPort private int port; @BeforeEach void before(PactVerificationContext context) { context.setTarget(new HttpTestTarget("localhost", port)); } } ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-provider-spring
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Artifact pact-jvm-provider-spring
Group au.com.dius
Version 4.0.10
Last update 18. April 2020
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 5
Dependencies spring-boot-starter-test, spring-webmvc, javax.servlet-api, jackson-datatype-joda, pact-jvm-provider-junit,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-server from group au.com.dius.pact (version 4.4.0-beta.2)

Pact server =========== The pact server is a stand-alone interactions recorder and verifier, aimed at clients that are non-JVM or non-Ruby based. The pact client for that platform will need to be implemented, but it only be responsible for generating the `JSON` interactions, running the tests and communicating with the server. The server implements a `JSON` `REST` Admin API with the following endpoints. / -> For diagnostics, currently returns a list of ports of the running mock servers. /create -> For initialising a test server and submitting the JSON interactions. It returns a port /complete -> For finalising and verifying the interactions with the server. It writes the `JSON` pact file to disk. /publish -> For publishing contracts. It takes a contract from disk and publishes it to the configured broker ## Running the server Pact server takes the following parameters: ``` Usage: pact-jvm-server [options] [port] port port to run on (defaults to 29999) --help prints this usage text -h <value> | --host <value> host to bind to (defaults to localhost) -l <value> | --mock-port-lower <value> lower bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 20000) -u <value> | --mock-port-upper <value> upper bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 40000) -d | --daemon run as a daemon process -v <value> | --pact-version <value> pact version to generate for (2 or 3) -k <value> | --keystore-path <value> Path to keystore -p <value> | --keystore-password <value> Keystore password -s <value> | --ssl-port <value> Ssl port the mock server should run on. lower and upper bounds are ignored -b <value> | --broker <value> The baseUrl of the broker to publish contracts to (for example https://organization.broker.com -t <value | --token <value> API token for authentication to the pact broker --debug run with debug logging ``` ### Using trust store Trust store can be used. However, it is limited to a single port for the time being. ### Using a distribution archive You can download a [distribution from maven central](http://search.maven.org/remotecontent?filepath=au/com/dius/pact/pact-jvm-server/4.1.0/). There is both a ZIP and TAR archive. Unpack it to a directory of choice and then run the script in the bin directory. ### Building a distribution bundle You can build an application bundle with gradle by running: $ ./gradlew :pact-jvm-server:installdist This will create an app bundle in `build/install/pact-jvm-server`. You can then execute it with: $ java -jar pact-jvm-server/build/install/pact-jvm-server/lib/pact-jvm-server-4.0.1.jar or with the generated bundle script file: $ pact-jvm-server/build/install/pact-jvm-server/bin/pact-jvm-server By default will run on port `29999` but a port number can be optionally supplied. ### Running it with docker You can use a docker image to execute the mock server as a docker container. $ docker run -d -p 8080:8080 -p 20000-20010:20000-20010 uglyog/pact-jvm-server This will run the main server on port 8080, and each created mock server on ports 20000-20010. You can map the ports to any you require. ## Life cycle The following actions are expected to occur * The client calls `/create` to initialise a server with the expected `JSON` interactions and state * The admin server will start a mock server on a random port and return the port number in the response * The client will execute its interaction tests against the mock server with the supplied port * Once finished, the client will call `/complete' on the Admin API, posting the port number * The pact server will verify the interactions and write the `JSON` `pact` file to disk under `/target` * The mock server running on the supplied port will be shutdown. * The client will call `/publish` to publish the created contract to the configured pact broker ## Endpoints ### /create The client will need `POST` to `/create` the generated `JSON` interactions, also providing a state as a query parameter and a path. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/create?state=NoUsers&path=/sub/ref/path '{ "provider": { "name": "Animal_Service"}, ... }' This will create a new running mock service provider on a randomly generated port. The port will be returned in the `201` response: { "port" : 34423 } But you can also reference the path from `/sub/ref/path` using the server port. The service will not strip the prefix path, but instead will use it as a differentiator. If your services do not have differences in the prefix of their path, then you will have to use the port method. ### /complete Once the client has finished running its tests against the mock server on the supplied port (in this example port `34423`) the client will need to `POST` to `/complete` the port number of the mock server that was used. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/complete '{ "port" : 34423 }' This will cause the Pact server to verify the interactions, shutdown the mock server running on that port and writing the pact `JSON` file to disk under the `target` directory. ### /publish Once all interactions have been tested the `/publish` endpoint can be called to publish the created pact to the pact broker For this it is required to run the pact-jvm-server with the -b parameter to configure the pact broker to publish the pacts to. Optionaly an authentication token can be used for authentication against the broker. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/publish '{ "consumer": "Zoo", "consumerVersion": "0.0.1", "provider": "Animal_Service" }' This will cause the Pact server to check for the pact `Zoo-Animal_Service.json` on disk under `target` and publish it to the configured pact broker. After a successful publish the pact will be removed from disk. ### / The `/` endpoint is for diagnostics and to check that the pact server is running. It will return all the currently running mock servers port numbers. For example: GET http://localhost:29999/ '{ "ports": [23443,43232] }'

Group: au.com.dius.pact Artifact: pact-jvm-server
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Artifact pact-jvm-server
Group au.com.dius.pact
Version 4.4.0-beta.2
Last update 27. April 2022
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-server_2.12 from group au.com.dius (version 3.6.15)

Pact server =========== The pact server is a stand-alone interactions recorder and verifier, aimed at clients that are non-JVM or non-Ruby based. The pact client for that platform will need to be implemented, but it only be responsible for generating the `JSON` interactions, running the tests and communicating with the server. The server implements a `JSON` `REST` Admin API with the following endpoints. / -> For diagnostics, currently returns a list of ports of the running mock servers. /create -> For initialising a test server and submitting the JSON interactions. It returns a port /complete -> For finalising and verifying the interactions with the server. It writes the `JSON` pact file to disk. ## Running the server ### Versions 2.2.6+ Pact server takes the following parameters: ``` Usage: pact-jvm-server [options] [port] port port to run on (defaults to 29999) --help prints this usage text -h <value> | --host <value> host to bind to (defaults to localhost) -l <value> | --mock-port-lower <value> lower bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 20000) -u <value> | --mock-port-upper <value> upper bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 40000) -d | --daemon run as a daemon process -v <value> | --pact-version <value> pact version to generate for (2 or 3) -k <value> | --keystore-path <value> Path to keystore -p <value> | --keystore-password <value> Keystore password -s <value> | --ssl-port <value> Ssl port the mock server should run on. lower and upper bounds are ignored --debug run with debug logging ``` ### Using trust store 3.4.0+ Trust store can be used. However, it is limited to a single port for the time being. ### Prior to version 2.2.6 Pact server takes one optional parameter, the port number to listen on. If not provided, it will listen on 29999. It requires an active console to run. ### Using a distribution archive You can download a [distribution from maven central](http://search.maven.org/remotecontent?filepath=au/com/dius/pact-jvm-server_2.11/2.2.4/). There is both a ZIP and TAR archive. Unpack it to a directory of choice and then run the script in the bin directory. ### Building a distribution bundle You can build an application bundle with gradle by running (for 2.11 version): $ ./gradlew :pact-jvm-server_2.11:installdist This will create an app bundle in `build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11`. You can then execute it with: $ java -jar pact-jvm-server/build/2.10/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/lib/pact-jvm-server_2.11-3.2.11.jar or with the generated bundle script file: $ pact-jvm-server/build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/bin/pact-jvm-server_2.11 By default will run on port `29999` but a port number can be optionally supplied. ### Running it with docker You can use a docker image to execute the mock server as a docker container. $ docker run -d -p 8080:8080 -p 20000-20010:20000-20010 uglyog/pact-jvm-server This will run the main server on port 8080, and each created mock server on ports 20000-20010. You can map the ports to any you require. ## Life cycle The following actions are expected to occur * The client calls `/create` to initialise a server with the expected `JSON` interactions and state * The admin server will start a mock server on a random port and return the port number in the response * The client will execute its interaction tests against the mock server with the supplied port * Once finished, the client will call `/complete' on the Admin API, posting the port number * The pact server will verify the interactions and write the `JSON` `pact` file to disk under `/target` * The mock server running on the supplied port will be shutdown. ## Endpoints ### /create The client will need `POST` to `/create` the generated `JSON` interactions, also providing a state as a query parameter and a path. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/create?state=NoUsers&path=/sub/ref/path '{ "provider": { "name": "Animal_Service"}, ... }' This will create a new running mock service provider on a randomly generated port. The port will be returned in the `201` response: { "port" : 34423 } But you can also reference the path from `/sub/ref/path` using the server port. The service will not strip the prefix path, but instead will use it as a differentiator. If your services do not have differences in the prefix of their path, then you will have to use the port method. ### /complete Once the client has finished running its tests against the mock server on the supplied port (in this example port `34423`) the client will need to `POST` to `/complete` the port number of the mock server that was used. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/complete '{ "port" : 34423 }' This will cause the Pact server to verify the interactions, shutdown the mock server running on that port and writing the pact `JSON` file to disk under the `target` directory. ### / The `/` endpoint is for diagnostics and to check that the pact server is running. It will return all the currently running mock servers port numbers. For example: GET http://localhost:29999/ '{ "ports": [23443,43232] }'

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-server_2.12
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Artifact pact-jvm-server_2.12
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.6.15
Last update 29. April 2020
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 4
Dependencies pact-jvm-consumer_2.12, logback-core, logback-classic, scopt_2.12,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.12 from group au.com.dius (version 3.6.15)

pact-jvm-consumer-junit5 ======================== JUnit 5 support for Pact consumer tests ## Dependency The library is available on maven central using: * group-id = `au.com.dius` * artifact-id = `pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.12` * version-id = `3.6.x` ## Usage ### 1. Add the Pact consumer test extension to the test class. To write Pact consumer tests with JUnit 5, you need to add `@ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt)` to your test class. This replaces the `PactRunner` used for JUnit 4 tests. The rest of the test follows a similar pattern as for JUnit 4 tests. ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` ### 2. create a method annotated with `@Pact` that returns the interactions for the test For each test (as with JUnit 4), you need to define a method annotated with the `@Pact` annotation that returns the interactions for the test. ```java @Pact(provider="ArticlesProvider", consumer="test_consumer") public RequestResponsePact createPact(PactDslWithProvider builder) { return builder .given("test state") .uponReceiving("ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest test interaction") .path("/articles.json") .method("GET") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"responsetest\": true}") .toPact(); } ``` ### 3. Link the mock server with the interactions for the test with `@PactTestFor` Then the final step is to use the `@PactTestFor` annotation to tell the Pact extension how to setup the Pact test. You can either put this annotation on the test class, or on the test method. For examples see [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) and [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy). The `@PactTestFor` annotation allows you to control the mock server in the same way as the JUnit 4 `PactProviderRule`. It allows you to set the hostname to bind to (default is `localhost`) and the port (default is to use a random port). You can also set the Pact specification version to use (default is V3). ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) @PactTestFor(providerName = "ArticlesProvider") public class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` **NOTE on the hostname**: The mock server runs in the same JVM as the test, so the only valid values for hostname are: | hostname | result | | -------- | ------ | | `localhost` | binds to the address that localhost points to (normally the loopback adapter) | | `127.0.0.1` or `::1` | binds to the loopback adapter | | host name | binds to the default interface that the host machines DNS name resolves to | | `0.0.0.0` or `::` | binds to the all interfaces on the host machine | #### Matching the interactions by provider name If you set the `providerName` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the first method with a `@Pact` annotation with the same provider name will be used. See [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) for an example. #### Matching the interactions by method name If you set the `pactMethod` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the method with the provided name will be used (it still needs a `@Pact` annotation). See [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy) for an example. ### Injecting the mock server into the test You can get the mock server injected into the test method by adding a `MockServer` parameter to the test method. ```java @Test void test(MockServer mockServer) throws IOException { HttpResponse httpResponse = Request.Get(mockServer.getUrl() + "/articles.json").execute().returnResponse(); assertThat(httpResponse.getStatusLine().getStatusCode(), is(equalTo(200))); } ``` This helps with getting the base URL of the mock server, especially when a random port is used. ## Changing the directory pact files are written to By default, pact files are written to `target/pacts` (or `build/pacts` if you use Gradle), but this can be overwritten with the `pact.rootDir` system property. This property needs to be set on the test JVM as most build tools will fork a new JVM to run the tests. For Gradle, add this to your build.gradle: ```groovy test { systemProperties['pact.rootDir'] = "$buildDir/custom-pacts-directory" } ``` For maven, use the systemPropertyVariables configuration: ```xml <project> [...] <build> <plugins> <plugin> <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId> <version>2.18</version> <configuration> <systemPropertyVariables> <pact.rootDir>some/other/directory</pact.rootDir> <buildDirectory>${project.build.directory}</buildDirectory> [...] </systemPropertyVariables> </configuration> </plugin> </plugins> </build> [...] </project> ``` For SBT: ```scala fork in Test := true, javaOptions in Test := Seq("-Dpact.rootDir=some/other/directory") ``` ### Using `@PactFolder` annotation [3.6.2+] You can override the directory the pacts are written in a test by adding the `@PactFolder` annotation to the test class. ## Forcing pact files to be overwritten (3.6.5+) By default, when the pact file is written, it will be merged with any existing pact file. To force the file to be overwritten, set the Java system property `pact.writer.overwrite` to `true`. ## Unsupported The current implementation does not support tests with multiple providers. This will be added in a later release. # Having values injected from provider state callbacks (3.6.11+) You can have values from the provider state callbacks be injected into most places (paths, query parameters, headers, bodies, etc.). This works by using the V3 spec generators with provider state callbacks that return values. One example of where this would be useful is API calls that require an ID which would be auto-generated by the database on the provider side, so there is no way to know what the ID would be beforehand. The following DSL methods all you to set an expression that will be parsed with the values returned from the provider states: For JSON bodies, use `valueFromProviderState`.<br/> For headers, use `headerFromProviderState`.<br/> For query parameters, use `queryParameterFromProviderState`.<br/> For paths, use `pathFromProviderState`. For example, assume that an API call is made to get the details of a user by ID. A provider state can be defined that specifies that the user must be exist, but the ID will be created when the user is created. So we can then define an expression for the path where the ID will be replaced with the value returned from the provider state callback. ```java .pathFromProviderState("/api/users/${id}", "/api/users/100") ``` You can also just use the key instead of an expression: ```java .valueFromProviderState('userId', 'userId', 100) // will look value using userId as the key ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.12
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Artifact pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.12
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.6.15
Last update 29. April 2020
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 2
Dependencies pact-jvm-consumer_2.12, junit-jupiter-api,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-consumer-junit5 from group au.com.dius (version 4.0.10)

pact-jvm-consumer-junit5 ======================== JUnit 5 support for Pact consumer tests ## Dependency The library is available on maven central using: * group-id = `au.com.dius` * artifact-id = `pact-jvm-consumer-junit5` * version-id = `4.0.x` ## Usage ### 1. Add the Pact consumer test extension to the test class. To write Pact consumer tests with JUnit 5, you need to add `@ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt)` to your test class. This replaces the `PactRunner` used for JUnit 4 tests. The rest of the test follows a similar pattern as for JUnit 4 tests. ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` ### 2. create a method annotated with `@Pact` that returns the interactions for the test For each test (as with JUnit 4), you need to define a method annotated with the `@Pact` annotation that returns the interactions for the test. ```java @Pact(provider="ArticlesProvider", consumer="test_consumer") public RequestResponsePact createPact(PactDslWithProvider builder) { return builder .given("test state") .uponReceiving("ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest test interaction") .path("/articles.json") .method("GET") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"responsetest\": true}") .toPact(); } ``` ### 3. Link the mock server with the interactions for the test with `@PactTestFor` Then the final step is to use the `@PactTestFor` annotation to tell the Pact extension how to setup the Pact test. You can either put this annotation on the test class, or on the test method. For examples see [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) and [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy). The `@PactTestFor` annotation allows you to control the mock server in the same way as the JUnit 4 `PactProviderRule`. It allows you to set the hostname to bind to (default is `localhost`) and the port (default is to use a random port). You can also set the Pact specification version to use (default is V3). ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) @PactTestFor(providerName = "ArticlesProvider") public class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` **NOTE on the hostname**: The mock server runs in the same JVM as the test, so the only valid values for hostname are: | hostname | result | | -------- | ------ | | `localhost` | binds to the address that localhost points to (normally the loopback adapter) | | `127.0.0.1` or `::1` | binds to the loopback adapter | | host name | binds to the default interface that the host machines DNS name resolves to | | `0.0.0.0` or `::` | binds to the all interfaces on the host machine | #### Matching the interactions by provider name If you set the `providerName` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the first method with a `@Pact` annotation with the same provider name will be used. See [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) for an example. #### Matching the interactions by method name If you set the `pactMethod` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the method with the provided name will be used (it still needs a `@Pact` annotation). See [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy) for an example. ### Injecting the mock server into the test You can get the mock server injected into the test method by adding a `MockServer` parameter to the test method. ```java @Test void test(MockServer mockServer) throws IOException { HttpResponse httpResponse = Request.Get(mockServer.getUrl() + "/articles.json").execute().returnResponse(); assertThat(httpResponse.getStatusLine().getStatusCode(), is(equalTo(200))); } ``` This helps with getting the base URL of the mock server, especially when a random port is used. ## Changing the directory pact files are written to By default, pact files are written to `target/pacts` (or `build/pacts` if you use Gradle), but this can be overwritten with the `pact.rootDir` system property. This property needs to be set on the test JVM as most build tools will fork a new JVM to run the tests. For Gradle, add this to your build.gradle: ```groovy test { systemProperties['pact.rootDir'] = "$buildDir/custom-pacts-directory" } ``` For maven, use the systemPropertyVariables configuration: ```xml <project> [...] <build> <plugins> <plugin> <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId> <version>2.18</version> <configuration> <systemPropertyVariables> <pact.rootDir>some/other/directory</pact.rootDir> <buildDirectory>${project.build.directory}</buildDirectory> [...] </systemPropertyVariables> </configuration> </plugin> </plugins> </build> [...] </project> ``` For SBT: ```scala fork in Test := true, javaOptions in Test := Seq("-Dpact.rootDir=some/other/directory") ``` ### Using `@PactFolder` annotation You can override the directory the pacts are written in a test by adding the `@PactFolder` annotation to the test class. ## Forcing pact files to be overwritten (3.6.5+) By default, when the pact file is written, it will be merged with any existing pact file. To force the file to be overwritten, set the Java system property `pact.writer.overwrite` to `true`. ## Unsupported The current implementation does not support tests with multiple providers. This will be added in a later release. # Having values injected from provider state callbacks (3.6.11+) You can have values from the provider state callbacks be injected into most places (paths, query parameters, headers, bodies, etc.). This works by using the V3 spec generators with provider state callbacks that return values. One example of where this would be useful is API calls that require an ID which would be auto-generated by the database on the provider side, so there is no way to know what the ID would be beforehand. The following DSL methods all you to set an expression that will be parsed with the values returned from the provider states: For JSON bodies, use `valueFromProviderState`.<br/> For headers, use `headerFromProviderState`.<br/> For query parameters, use `queryParameterFromProviderState`.<br/> For paths, use `pathFromProviderState`. For example, assume that an API call is made to get the details of a user by ID. A provider state can be defined that specifies that the user must be exist, but the ID will be created when the user is created. So we can then define an expression for the path where the ID will be replaced with the value returned from the provider state callback. ```java .pathFromProviderState("/api/users/${id}", "/api/users/100") ``` You can also just use the key instead of an expression: ```java .valueFromProviderState('userId', 'userId', 100) // will look value using userId as the key ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-consumer-junit5
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Artifact pact-jvm-consumer-junit5
Group au.com.dius
Version 4.0.10
Last update 18. April 2020
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 2
Dependencies junit-jupiter-api, pact-jvm-consumer,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-server from group au.com.dius (version 4.0.10)

Pact server =========== The pact server is a stand-alone interactions recorder and verifier, aimed at clients that are non-JVM or non-Ruby based. The pact client for that platform will need to be implemented, but it only be responsible for generating the `JSON` interactions, running the tests and communicating with the server. The server implements a `JSON` `REST` Admin API with the following endpoints. / -> For diagnostics, currently returns a list of ports of the running mock servers. /create -> For initialising a test server and submitting the JSON interactions. It returns a port /complete -> For finalising and verifying the interactions with the server. It writes the `JSON` pact file to disk. ## Running the server ### Versions 2.2.6+ Pact server takes the following parameters: ``` Usage: pact-jvm-server [options] [port] port port to run on (defaults to 29999) --help prints this usage text -h <value> | --host <value> host to bind to (defaults to localhost) -l <value> | --mock-port-lower <value> lower bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 20000) -u <value> | --mock-port-upper <value> upper bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 40000) -d | --daemon run as a daemon process -v <value> | --pact-version <value> pact version to generate for (2 or 3) -k <value> | --keystore-path <value> Path to keystore -p <value> | --keystore-password <value> Keystore password -s <value> | --ssl-port <value> Ssl port the mock server should run on. lower and upper bounds are ignored --debug run with debug logging ``` ### Using trust store 3.4.0+ Trust store can be used. However, it is limited to a single port for the time being. ### Prior to version 2.2.6 Pact server takes one optional parameter, the port number to listen on. If not provided, it will listen on 29999. It requires an active console to run. ### Using a distribution archive You can download a [distribution from maven central](http://search.maven.org/remotecontent?filepath=au/com/dius/pact-jvm-server_2.11/2.2.4/). There is both a ZIP and TAR archive. Unpack it to a directory of choice and then run the script in the bin directory. ### Building a distribution bundle You can build an application bundle with gradle by running (for 2.11 version): $ ./gradlew :pact-jvm-server_2.11:installdist This will create an app bundle in `build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11`. You can then execute it with: $ java -jar pact-jvm-server/build/2.10/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/lib/pact-jvm-server_2.11-3.2.11.jar or with the generated bundle script file: $ pact-jvm-server/build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/bin/pact-jvm-server_2.11 By default will run on port `29999` but a port number can be optionally supplied. ### Running it with docker You can use a docker image to execute the mock server as a docker container. $ docker run -d -p 8080:8080 -p 20000-20010:20000-20010 uglyog/pact-jvm-server This will run the main server on port 8080, and each created mock server on ports 20000-20010. You can map the ports to any you require. ## Life cycle The following actions are expected to occur * The client calls `/create` to initialise a server with the expected `JSON` interactions and state * The admin server will start a mock server on a random port and return the port number in the response * The client will execute its interaction tests against the mock server with the supplied port * Once finished, the client will call `/complete' on the Admin API, posting the port number * The pact server will verify the interactions and write the `JSON` `pact` file to disk under `/target` * The mock server running on the supplied port will be shutdown. ## Endpoints ### /create The client will need `POST` to `/create` the generated `JSON` interactions, also providing a state as a query parameter and a path. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/create?state=NoUsers&path=/sub/ref/path '{ "provider": { "name": "Animal_Service"}, ... }' This will create a new running mock service provider on a randomly generated port. The port will be returned in the `201` response: { "port" : 34423 } But you can also reference the path from `/sub/ref/path` using the server port. The service will not strip the prefix path, but instead will use it as a differentiator. If your services do not have differences in the prefix of their path, then you will have to use the port method. ### /complete Once the client has finished running its tests against the mock server on the supplied port (in this example port `34423`) the client will need to `POST` to `/complete` the port number of the mock server that was used. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/complete '{ "port" : 34423 }' This will cause the Pact server to verify the interactions, shutdown the mock server running on that port and writing the pact `JSON` file to disk under the `target` directory. ### / The `/` endpoint is for diagnostics and to check that the pact server is running. It will return all the currently running mock servers port numbers. For example: GET http://localhost:29999/ '{ "ports": [23443,43232] }'

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-server
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Artifact pact-jvm-server
Group au.com.dius
Version 4.0.10
Last update 18. April 2020
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-server_2.11 from group au.com.dius (version 3.5.17)

Pact server =========== The pact server is a stand-alone interactions recorder and verifier, aimed at clients that are non-JVM or non-Ruby based. The pact client for that platform will need to be implemented, but it only be responsible for generating the `JSON` interactions, running the tests and communicating with the server. The server implements a `JSON` `REST` Admin API with the following endpoints. / -> For diagnostics, currently returns a list of ports of the running mock servers. /create -> For initialising a test server and submitting the JSON interactions. It returns a port /complete -> For finalising and verifying the interactions with the server. It writes the `JSON` pact file to disk. ## Running the server ### Versions 2.2.6+ Pact server takes the following parameters: ``` Usage: pact-jvm-server [options] [port] port port to run on (defaults to 29999) --help prints this usage text -h <value> | --host <value> host to bind to (defaults to localhost) -l <value> | --mock-port-lower <value> lower bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 20000) -u <value> | --mock-port-upper <value> upper bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 40000) -d | --daemon run as a daemon process -v <value> | --pact-version <value> pact version to generate for (2 or 3) -k <value> | --keystore-path <value> Path to keystore -p <value> | --keystore-password <value> Keystore password -s <value> | --ssl-port <value> Ssl port the mock server should run on. lower and upper bounds are ignored --debug run with debug logging ``` ### Using trust store 3.4.0+ Trust store can be used. However, it is limited to a single port for the time being. ### Prior to version 2.2.6 Pact server takes one optional parameter, the port number to listen on. If not provided, it will listen on 29999. It requires an active console to run. ### Using a distribution archive You can download a [distribution from maven central](http://search.maven.org/remotecontent?filepath=au/com/dius/pact-jvm-server_2.11/2.2.4/). There is both a ZIP and TAR archive. Unpack it to a directory of choice and then run the script in the bin directory. ### Building a distribution bundle You can build an application bundle with gradle by running (for 2.11 version): $ ./gradlew :pact-jvm-server_2.11:installdist This will create an app bundle in `build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11`. You can then execute it with: $ java -jar pact-jvm-server/build/2.10/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/lib/pact-jvm-server_2.11-3.2.11.jar or with the generated bundle script file: $ pact-jvm-server/build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/bin/pact-jvm-server_2.11 By default will run on port `29999` but a port number can be optionally supplied. ### Running it with docker You can use a docker image to execute the mock server as a docker container. $ docker run -d -p 8080:8080 -p 20000-20010:20000-20010 uglyog/pact-jvm-server This will run the main server on port 8080, and each created mock server on ports 20000-20010. You can map the ports to any you require. ## Life cycle The following actions are expected to occur * The client calls `/create` to initialise a server with the expected `JSON` interactions and state * The admin server will start a mock server on a random port and return the port number in the response * The client will execute its interaction tests against the mock server with the supplied port * Once finished, the client will call `/complete' on the Admin API, posting the port number * The pact server will verify the interactions and write the `JSON` `pact` file to disk under `/target` * The mock server running on the supplied port will be shutdown. ## Endpoints ### /create The client will need `POST` to `/create` the generated `JSON` interactions, also providing a state as a query parameter and a path. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/create?state=NoUsers&path=/sub/ref/path '{ "provider": { "name": "Animal_Service"}, ... }' This will create a new running mock service provider on a randomly generated port. The port will be returned in the `201` response: { "port" : 34423 } But you can also reference the path from `/sub/ref/path` using the server port. The service will not strip the prefix path, but instead will use it as a differentiator. If your services do not have differences in the prefix of their path, then you will have to use the port method. ### /complete Once the client has finished running its tests against the mock server on the supplied port (in this example port `34423`) the client will need to `POST` to `/complete` the port number of the mock server that was used. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/complete '{ "port" : 34423 }' This will cause the Pact server to verify the interactions, shutdown the mock server running on that port and writing the pact `JSON` file to disk under the `target` directory. ### / The `/` endpoint is for diagnostics and to check that the pact server is running. It will return all the currently running mock servers port numbers. For example: GET http://localhost:29999/ '{ "ports": [23443,43232] }'

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-server_2.11
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Artifact pact-jvm-server_2.11
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.5.17
Last update 03. June 2018
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 11
Dependencies kotlin-stdlib-jre8, kotlin-reflect, slf4j-api, groovy-all, kotlin-logging, scala-library, scala-logging_2.11, pact-jvm-consumer_2.11, logback-core, logback-classic, scopt_2.11,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!



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