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spring from group au.com.dius.pact.provider (version 4.2.0-beta.0)

# Pact Spring/JUnit runner ## Overview Library provides ability to play contract tests against a provider using Spring & JUnit. This library is based on and references the JUnit package, so see the [Pact JUnit 4](/provider/junit/README.md) or [Pact JUnit 5](/provider/junit5/README.md) providers for more details regarding configuration using JUnit. Supports: - Standard ways to load pacts from folders and broker - Easy way to change assertion strategy - Spring Test MockMVC Controllers and ControllerAdvice using MockMvc standalone setup. - MockMvc debugger output - Spring WebFlux Controllers and RouterFunctions - Multiple @State runs to test a particular Provider State multiple times - **au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.State** custom annotation - before each interaction that requires a state change, all methods annotated by `@State` with appropriate the state listed will be invoked. **NOTE:** For publishing provider verification results to a pact broker, make sure the Java system property `pact.provider.version` is set with the version of your provider. ## Example of MockMvc test ```java @RunWith(RestPactRunner.class) // Custom pact runner, child of PactRunner which runs only REST tests @Provider("myAwesomeService") // Set up name of tested provider @PactFolder("pacts") // Point where to find pacts (See also section Pacts source in documentation) public class ContractTest { //Create an instance of your controller. We cannot autowire this as we're not using (and don't want to use) a Spring test runner. @InjectMocks private AwesomeController awesomeController = new AwesomeController(); //Mock your service logic class. We'll use this to create scenarios for respective provider states. @Mock private AwesomeBusinessLogic awesomeBusinessLogic; //Create an instance of your controller advice (if you have one). This will be passed to the MockMvcTarget constructor to be wired up with MockMvc. @InjectMocks private AwesomeControllerAdvice awesomeControllerAdvice = new AwesomeControllerAdvice(); //Create a new instance of the MockMvcTarget and annotate it as the TestTarget for PactRunner @TestTarget public final MockMvcTarget target = new MockMvcTarget(); @Before //Method will be run before each test of interaction public void before() { //initialize your mocks using your mocking framework MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(this); //configure the MockMvcTarget with your controller and controller advice target.setControllers(awesomeController); target.setControllerAdvice(awesomeControllerAdvice); } @State("default", "no-data") // Method will be run before testing interactions that require "default" or "no-data" state public void toDefaultState() { target.setRunTimes(3); //let's loop through this state a few times for a 3 data variants when(awesomeBusinessLogic.getById(any(UUID.class))) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.ONE)) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.TWO)) .thenReturn(myTestHelper.generateRandomReturnData(UUID.randomUUID(), ExampleEnum.THREE)); } @State("error-case") public void SingleUploadExistsState_Success() { target.setRunTimes(1); //tell the runner to only loop one time for this state //you might want to throw exceptions to be picked off by your controller advice when(awesomeBusinessLogic.getById(any(UUID.class))) .then(i -> { throw new NotCoolException(i.getArgumentAt(0, UUID.class).toString()); }); } } ``` ## Example of Spring WebFlux test ```java @RunWith(RestPactRunner.class) // Custom pact runner, child of PactRunner which runs only REST tests @Provider("myAwesomeService") // Set up name of tested provider @PactFolder("pacts") // Point where to find pacts (See also section Pacts source in documentation) public class AwesomeRouterContractTest { //Create a new instance of the WebFluxTarget and annotate it as the TestTarget for PactRunner @TestTarget public WebFluxTarget target = new WebFluxTarget(); //Create instance of your RouterFunction public RouterFunction<ServerResponse> routerFunction = new AwesomeRouter(new AwesomeHandler()).routes(); //Configure the WebFluxTarget with routerFunction @Before public void setup() { target.setRouterFunction(routerFunction); } } ``` ## Using Spring runners You can use `SpringRestPactRunner` or `SpringMessagePactRunner` instead of the default Pact runner to use the Spring test annotations. This will allow you to inject or mock spring beans. `SpringRestPactRunner` is for restful webapps and `SpringMessagePactRunner` is for async message tests. For example: ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("pricing") @PactBroker(protocol = "https", host = "${pactBrokerHost}", port = "443", authentication = @PactBrokerAuth(username = "${pactBrokerUser}", password = "${pactBrokerPassword}")) @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.DEFINED_PORT) public class PricingServiceProviderPactTest { @MockBean private ProductClient productClient; // This will replace the bean with a mock in the application context @TestTarget @SuppressWarnings(value = "VisibilityModifier") public final Target target = new HttpTarget(8091); @State("Product X010000021 exists") public void setupProductX010000021() throws IOException { reset(productClient); ProductBuilder product = new ProductBuilder() .withProductCode("X010000021"); when(productClient.fetch((Set<String>) argThat(contains("X010000021")), any())).thenReturn(product); } @State("the product code X00001 can be priced") public void theProductCodeX00001CanBePriced() throws IOException { reset(productClient); ProductBuilder product = new ProductBuilder() .withProductCode("X00001"); when(productClient.find((Set<String>) argThat(contains("X00001")), any())).thenReturn(product); } } ``` ### Using Spring Context Properties The SpringRestPactRunner will look up any annotation expressions (like `${pactBrokerHost}`) above) from the Spring context. For Springboot, this will allow you to define the properties in the application test properties. For instance, if you create the following `application.yml` in the test resources: ```yaml pactbroker: host: "your.broker.local" port: "443" protocol: "https" auth: username: "<your broker username>" password: "<your broker password>" ``` Then you can use the defaults on the `@PactBroker` annotation. ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker( authentication = @PactBrokerAuth(username = "${pactbroker.auth.username}", password = "${pactbroker.auth.password}") ) @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { ``` ### Using a random port with a Springboot test If you use a random port in a springboot test (by setting `SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT`), you need to set it to the `TestTarget`. How this works is different for JUnit4 and JUnit5. #### JUnit4 You can use the `SpringBootHttpTarget` which will get the application port from the spring application context. For example: ```java @RunWith(SpringRestPactRunner.class) @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { @TestTarget public final Target target = new SpringBootHttpTarget(); } ``` #### JUnit5 You actually don't need to dependend on `pact-jvm-provider-spring` for this. It's sufficient to depend on `pact-jvm-provider-junit5`. You can set the port to the `HttpTestTarget` object in the before method. ```java @Provider("My Service") @PactBroker @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT) public class PactVerificationTest { @LocalServerPort private int port; @BeforeEach void before(PactVerificationContext context) { context.setTarget(new HttpTestTarget("localhost", port)); } } ```

Group: au.com.dius.pact.provider Artifact: spring
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Artifact spring
Group au.com.dius.pact.provider
Version 4.2.0-beta.0
Last update 18. October 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 1
Dependencies junit,
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specs2_2.13 from group au.com.dius.pact.provider (version 4.2.0-beta.0)

pact-jvm-provider-specs2 ======================== Provides an extension to Specs2 Specification to validate a pact file against a running provider. See [ExampleProviderSpec.scala](https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm/blob/master/provider/specs2/src/test/scala/au/com/dius/pact/provider/specs2/ExampleProviderSpec.scala) for an example. <!-- Absolute URL to example to support rendering this page in docs.pact.io --> *Note:* The Pact ProviderSpec requires spec2 3.x

Group: au.com.dius.pact.provider Artifact: specs2_2.13
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Group au.com.dius.pact.provider
Version 4.2.0-beta.0
Last update 18. October 2020
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URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 5
Dependencies provider, scalasupport_2.13, specs2-core_2.13, scala-library, scala-logging_2.13,
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scalatest_2.13 from group au.com.dius.pact.provider (version 4.2.0-beta.0)

pact-jvm-provider-scalatest ======================== Provides an extension to scalatest to validate pact files against a running provider. See [examples](https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm/tree/master/provider/scalatest/src/test/scala/au/com/dius/pact/provider/scalatest) for details. <!-- absolute URL for docs.pact.io --> *Note:* The Pact ProviderSpec requires scalatest 2.2.x

Group: au.com.dius.pact.provider Artifact: scalatest_2.13
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Group au.com.dius.pact.provider
Version 4.2.0-beta.0
Last update 18. October 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 3
Dependencies provider, scalasupport_2.13, scalatest_2.13,
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scalasupport_2.13 from group au.com.dius.pact.provider (version 4.2.0-beta.0)

Scala Support classes =====================

Group: au.com.dius.pact.provider Artifact: scalasupport_2.13
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Group au.com.dius.pact.provider
Version 4.2.0-beta.0
Last update 18. October 2020
Newest version Yes
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URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 7
Dependencies model, provider, scala-library, scala-logging_2.13, scala-java8-compat_2.13, async-http-client, unfiltered-netty-server_2.13,
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maven from group au.com.dius.pact.provider (version 4.2.0-beta.0)

Maven plugin to verify a provider ================================= Maven plugin for verifying pacts against a provider. **NOTE: If you are running your tests with the JUnit runners, you do not need this plugin.** The Maven plugin provides a `verify` goal which will verify all configured pacts against your provider. ## To Use It ### 1. Add the pact-jvm-provider-maven plugin to your `build` section of your pom file. ```xml <build> [...] <plugins> [...] <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> </plugin> [...] </plugins> [...] </build> ``` ### 2. Define the pacts between your consumers and providers You define all the providers and consumers within the configuration element of the maven plugin. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <!-- You can define as many as you need, but each must have a unique name --> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <!-- All the provider properties are optional, and have sensible defaults (shown below) --> <protocol>http</protocol> <host>localhost</host> <port>8080</port> <path>/</path> <consumers> <!-- Again, you can define as many consumers for each provider as you need, but each must have a unique name --> <consumer> <name>consumer1</name> <!-- currently supports a file path using pactFile or a URL using pactUrl --> <pactFile>path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json</pactFile> </consumer> </consumers> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ### 3. Execute `mvn pact:verify` You will have to have your provider running for this to pass. ## Verifying all pact files in a directory for a provider You can specify a directory that contains pact files, and the Pact plugin will scan for all pact files that match that provider and define a consumer for each pact file in the directory. Consumer name is read from contents of pact file. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <!-- You can define as many as you need, but each must have a unique name --> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <!-- All the provider properties are optional, and have sensible defaults (shown below) --> <protocol>http</protocol> <host>localhost</host> <port>8080</port> <path>/</path> <pactFileDirectory>path/to/pacts</pactFileDirectory> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ### Verifying all pact files from multiple directories for a provider If you want to specify multiple directories, you can use `pactFileDirectories`. The plugin will only fail the build if no pact files are loaded after processing all the directories in the list. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <pactFileDirectories> <pactFileDirectory>path/to/pacts1</pactFileDirectory> <pactFileDirectory>path/to/pacts2</pactFileDirectory> </pactFileDirectories> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ## Enabling insecure SSL For providers that are running on SSL with self-signed certificates, you need to enable insecure SSL mode by setting `<insecure>true</insecure>` on the provider. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <pactFileDirectory>path/to/pacts</pactFileDirectory> <insecure>true</insecure> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ## Specifying a custom trust store For environments that are running their own certificate chains: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <pactFileDirectory>path/to/pacts</pactFileDirectory> <trustStore>relative/path/to/trustStore.jks</trustStore> <trustStorePassword>changeit</trustStorePassword> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` `trustStore` is either relative to the current working (build) directory. `trustStorePassword` defaults to `changeit`. NOTE: The hostname will still be verified against the certificate. ## Modifying the requests before they are sent Sometimes you may need to add things to the requests that can't be persisted in a pact file. Examples of these would be authentication tokens, which have a small life span. The Pact Maven plugin provides a request filter that can be set to a Groovy script on the provider that will be called before the request is made. This script will receive the HttpRequest bound to a variable named `request` prior to it being executed. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <requestFilter> // This is a Groovy script that adds an Authorization header to each request request.addHeader('Authorization', 'oauth-token eyJhbGciOiJSUzI1NiIsIm...') </requestFilter> <consumers> <consumer> <name>consumer1</name> <pactFile>path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json</pactFile> </consumer> </consumers> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` __*Important Note:*__ You should only use this feature for things that can not be persisted in the pact file. By modifying the request, you are potentially modifying the contract from the consumer tests! ## Modifying the HTTP Client Used The default HTTP client is used for all requests to providers (created with a call to `HttpClients.createDefault()`). This can be changed by specifying a closure assigned to createClient on the provider that returns a CloseableHttpClient. For example: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <createClient> // This is a Groovy script that will enable the client to accept self-signed certificates import org.apache.http.ssl.SSLContextBuilder import org.apache.http.conn.ssl.NoopHostnameVerifier import org.apache.http.impl.client.HttpClients HttpClients.custom().setSSLHostnameVerifier(new NoopHostnameVerifier()) .setSslcontext(new SSLContextBuilder().loadTrustMaterial(null, { x509Certificates, s -> true }) .build()) .build() </createClient> <consumers> <consumer> <name>consumer1</name> <pactFile>path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json</pactFile> </consumer> </consumers> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ## Turning off URL decoding of the paths in the pact file By default the paths loaded from the pact file will be decoded before the request is sent to the provider. To turn this behaviour off, set the system property `pact.verifier.disableUrlPathDecoding` to `true`. __*Important Note:*__ If you turn off the url path decoding, you need to ensure that the paths in the pact files are correctly encoded. The verifier will not be able to make a request with an invalid encoded path. ## Plugin Properties The following plugin properties can be specified with `-Dproperty=value` on the command line or in the configuration section: |Property|Description| |--------|-----------| |`pact.showStacktrace`|This turns on stacktrace printing for each request. It can help with diagnosing network errors| |`pact.showFullDiff`|This turns on displaying the full diff of the expected versus actual bodies| |`pact.filter.consumers`|Comma separated list of consumer names to verify| |`pact.filter.description`|Only verify interactions whose description match the provided regular expression| |`pact.filter.providerState`|Only verify interactions whose provider state match the provided regular expression. An empty string matches interactions that have no state| |`pact.filter.pacturl`|This filter allows just the just the changed pact specified in a webhook to be run. It should be used in conjunction with `pact.filter.consumers`| |`pact.verifier.publishResults`|Publishing of verification results will be skipped unless this property is set to `true` [version 3.5.18+]| |`pact.matching.wildcard`|Enables matching of map values ignoring the keys when this property is set to `true`| |`pact.verifier.disableUrlPathDecoding`|Disables decoding of request paths| |`pact.pactbroker.httpclient.usePreemptiveAuthentication`|Enables preemptive authentication with the pact broker when set to `true`| |`pact.consumer.tags`|Overrides the tags used when publishing pacts [version 4.0.7+]| |`pact.content_type.override.<TYPE>.<SUBTYPE>=text\|binary`|Overrides the handling of a particular content type [version 4.1.3+]| Example in the configuration section: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <consumers> <consumer> <name>consumer1</name> <pactFile>path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json</pactFile> </consumer> </consumers> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> <configuration> <pact.showStacktrace>true</pact.showStacktrace> </configuration> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ## Provider States For each provider you can specify a state change URL to use to switch the state of the provider. This URL will receive the providerState description and parameters from the pact file before each interaction via a POST. The stateChangeUsesBody controls if the state is passed in the request body or as query parameters. These values can be set at the provider level, or for a specific consumer. Consumer values take precedent if both are given. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <stateChangeUrl>http://localhost:8080/tasks/pactStateChange</stateChangeUrl> <stateChangeUsesBody>false</stateChangeUsesBody> <!-- defaults to true --> <consumers> <consumer> <name>consumer1</name> <pactFile>path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json</pactFile> <stateChangeUrl>http://localhost:8080/tasks/pactStateChangeForConsumer1</stateChangeUrl> <stateChangeUsesBody>false</stateChangeUsesBody> <!-- defaults to true --> </consumer> </consumers> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` If the `stateChangeUsesBody` is not specified, or is set to true, then the provider state description and parameters will be sent as JSON in the body of the request. If it is set to false, they will passed as query parameters. As for normal requests (see Modifying the requests before they are sent), a state change request can be modified before it is sent. Set `stateChangeRequestFilter` to a Groovy script on the provider that will be called before the request is made. #### Teardown calls for state changes You can enable teardown state change calls by setting the property `<stateChangeTeardown>true</stateChangeTeardown>` on the provider. This will add an `action` parameter to the state change call. The setup call before the test will receive `action=setup`, and then a teardown call will be made afterwards to the state change URL with `action=teardown`. #### Returning values that can be injected You can have values from the provider state callbacks be injected into most places (paths, query parameters, headers, bodies, etc.). This works by using the V3 spec generators with provider state callbacks that return values. One example of where this would be useful is API calls that require an ID which would be auto-generated by the database on the provider side, so there is no way to know what the ID would be beforehand. There are methods on the consumer DSLs that can provider an expression that contains variables (like '/api/user/${id}' for the path). The provider state callback can then return a map for values, and the `id` attribute from the map will be expanded in the expression. For URL callbacks, the values need to be returned as JSON in the response body. ## Verifying pact files from a pact broker You can setup your build to validate against the pacts stored in a pact broker. The pact plugin will query the pact broker for all consumers that have a pact with the provider based on its name. To use it, just configure the `pactBrokerUrl` or `pactBroker` value for the provider with the base URL to the pact broker. For example: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <stateChangeUrl>http://localhost:8080/tasks/pactStateChange</stateChangeUrl> <pactBrokerUrl>http://pact-broker:5000/</pactBrokerUrl> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ### Verifying pacts from an authenticated pact broker If your pact broker requires authentication (basic and bearer authentication are supported), you can configure the username and password to use by configuring the `authentication` element of the `pactBroker` element of your provider. For example, here is how you configure the plugin to use basic authentication for verifying pacts: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <stateChangeUrl>http://localhost:8080/tasks/pactStateChange</stateChangeUrl> <pactBroker> <url>http://pactbroker:1234</url> <authentication> <scheme>basic</scheme> <username>test</username> <password>test</password> </authentication> </pactBroker> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` Here is how you configure the plugin to use bearer token authentication for verifying pacts ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <stateChangeUrl>http://localhost:8080/tasks/pactStateChange</stateChangeUrl> <pactBroker> <url>http://pactbroker:1234</url> <authentication> <scheme>bearer</scheme> <token>TOKEN</token> </authentication> </pactBroker> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` Preemptive Authentication can be enabled by setting the `pact.pactbroker.httpclient.usePreemptiveAuthentication` Java system property to `true`. ### Allowing just the changed pact specified in a webhook to be verified [4.0.6+] When a consumer publishes a new version of a pact file, the Pact broker can fire off a webhook with the URL of the changed pact file. To allow only the changed pact file to be verified, you can override the URL by using the `pact.filter.consumers` and `pact.filter.pacturl` Java system properties. For example, running: ```console mvn pact:verify -Dpact.filter.consumers='Foo Web Client' -Dpact.filter.pacturl=https://test.pact.dius.com.au/pacts/provider/Activity%20Service/consumer/Foo%20Web%20Client/version/1.0.1 ``` will only run the verification for Foo Web Client with the given pact file URL. #### Using the Maven servers configuration You can use the servers setup in the Maven settings. To do this, setup a server as per the [Maven Server Settings](https://maven.apache.org/settings.html#Servers). Then set the server ID in the pact broker configuration in your POM. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <stateChangeUrl>http://localhost:8080/tasks/pactStateChange</stateChangeUrl> <pactBroker> <url>http://pactbroker:1234</url> <serverId>test-pact-broker</serverId> <!-- This must match the server id in the maven settings --> </pactBroker> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ### Verifying pacts from a pact broker that match particular tags If your pacts in your pact broker have been tagged, you can set the tags to fetch by configuring the `tags` element of the `pactBroker` element of your provider. For example: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <stateChangeUrl>http://localhost:8080/tasks/pactStateChange</stateChangeUrl> <pactBroker> <url>http://pactbroker:1234</url> <tags> <tag>TEST</tag> <tag>DEV</tag> </tags> </pactBroker> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` This example will fetch and validate the pacts for the TEST and DEV tags. ## Filtering the interactions that are verified You can filter the interactions that are run using three properties: `pact.filter.consumers`, `pact.filter.description` and `pact.filter.providerState`. Adding `-Dpact.filter.consumers=consumer1,consumer2` to the command line or configuration section will only run the pact files for those consumers (consumer1 and consumer2). Adding `-Dpact.filter.description=a request for payment.*` will only run those interactions whose descriptions start with 'a request for payment'. `-Dpact.filter.providerState=.*payment` will match any interaction that has a provider state that ends with payment, and `-Dpact.filter.providerState=` will match any interaction that does not have a provider state. ## Not failing the build if no pact files are found By default, if there are no pact files to verify, the plugin will raise an exception. This is to guard against false positives where the build is passing but nothing has been verified due to mis-configuration. To disable this behaviour, set the `failIfNoPactsFound` parameter to `false`. # Verifying a message provider The Maven plugin has been updated to allow invoking test methods that can return the message contents from a message producer. To use it, set the way to invoke the verification to `ANNOTATED_METHOD`. This will allow the pact verification task to scan for test methods that return the message contents. Add something like the following to your maven pom file: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>messageProvider</name> <verificationType>ANNOTATED_METHOD</verificationType> <!-- packagesToScan is optional, but leaving it out will result in the entire test classpath being scanned. Set it to the packages where your annotated test method can be found. --> <packagesToScan> <packageToScan>au.com.example.messageprovider.*</packageToScan> </packagesToScan> <consumers> <consumer> <name>consumer1</name> <pactFile>path/to/messageprovider-consumer1-pact.json</pactFile> </consumer> </consumers> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` Now when the pact verify task is run, will look for methods annotated with `@PactVerifyProvider` in the test classpath that have a matching description to what is in the pact file. ```groovy class ConfirmationKafkaMessageBuilderTest { @PactVerifyProvider('an order confirmation message') String verifyMessageForOrder() { Order order = new Order() order.setId(10000004) order.setExchange('ASX') order.setSecurityCode('CBA') order.setPrice(BigDecimal.TEN) order.setUnits(15) order.setGst(new BigDecimal('15.0')) odrer.setFees(BigDecimal.TEN) def message = new ConfirmationKafkaMessageBuilder() .withOrder(order) .build() JsonOutput.toJson(message) } } ``` It will then validate that the returned contents matches the contents for the message in the pact file. ## Changing the class path that is scanned By default, the test classpath is scanned for annotated methods. You can override this by setting the `classpathElements` property: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>messageProvider</name> <verificationType>ANNOTATED_METHOD</verificationType> <consumers> <consumer> <name>consumer1</name> <pactFile>path/to/messageprovider-consumer1-pact.json</pactFile> </consumer> </consumers> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> <classpathElements> <classpathElement> build/classes/test </classpathElement> </classpathElements> </configuration> </plugin> ``` # Publishing pact files to a pact broker **NOTE**: There is a pact CLI that can be used to publish pacts. See https://github.com/pact-foundation/pact-ruby-cli. The pact maven plugin provides a `publish` mojo that can publish all pact files in a directory to a pact broker. To use it, you need to add a publish configuration to the POM that defines the directory where the pact files are and the URL to the pact broker. For example: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <pactDirectory>path/to/pact/files</pactDirectory> <!-- Defaults to ${project.build.directory}/pacts --> <pactBrokerUrl>http://pactbroker:1234</pactBrokerUrl> <projectVersion>1.0.100</projectVersion> <!-- Defaults to ${project.version} --> <trimSnapshot>true</trimSnapshot> <!-- Defaults to false --> <skipPactPublish>false</skipPactPublish> <!-- Defaults to false --> </configuration> </plugin> ``` You can now execute `mvn pact:publish` to publish the pact files. _NOTE:_ The pact broker requires a version for all published pacts. The `publish` task will use the version of the project by default, but can be overwritten with the `projectVersion` property. Make sure you have set one otherwise the broker will reject the pact files. _NOTE_: By default, the pact broker has issues parsing `SNAPSHOT` versions. You can configure the publisher to automatically remove `-SNAPSHOT` from your version number by setting `trimSnapshot` to true. This setting does not modify non-snapshot versions. You can set any tags that the pacts should be published with by setting the `tags` list property. A common use of this is setting the tag to the current source control branch. This supports using pact with feature branches. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <pactDirectory>path/to/pact/files</pactDirectory> <!-- Defaults to ${project.build.directory}/pacts --> <pactBrokerUrl>http://pactbroker:1234</pactBrokerUrl> <projectVersion>1.0.100</projectVersion> <!-- Defaults to ${project.version} --> <tags> <tag>feature/feature_name</tag> </tags> </configuration> </plugin> ``` You can also specify the tags using the `pact.consumer.tags` Java system property [version 4.0.7+]. ## Publishing to an authenticated pact broker For an authenticated pact broker, you can pass in the credentials with the `pactBrokerUsername` and `pactBrokerPassword` properties. Currently, it only supports basic authentication or a bearer token. For example: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <pactBrokerUrl>http://pactbroker:1234</pactBrokerUrl> <pactBrokerUsername>USERNAME</pactBrokerUsername> <pactBrokerPassword>PASSWORD</pactBrokerPassword> </configuration> </plugin> ``` Or to use a bearer token: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.0.1</version> <configuration> <pactBrokerUrl>http://pactbroker:1234</pactBrokerUrl> <pactBrokerToken>TOKEN</pactBrokerToken> <!-- Replace TOKEN with the actual token --> <pactBrokerAuthenticationScheme>Bearer</pactBrokerAuthenticationScheme> </configuration> </plugin> ``` #### Using the Maven servers configuration You can use the servers setup in the Maven settings. To do this, setup a server as per the [Maven Server Settings](https://maven.apache.org/settings.html#Servers). Then set the server ID in the pact broker configuration in your POM. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <pactBrokerUrl>http://pactbroker:1234</pactBrokerUrl> <pactBrokerServerId>test-pact-broker</pactBrokerServerId> <!-- This must match the server id in the maven settings --> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ## Excluding pacts from being published You can exclude some of the pact files from being published by providing a list of regular expressions that match against the base names of the pact files. For example: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <pactBrokerUrl>http://pactbroker:1234</pactBrokerUrl> <excludes> <exclude>.*\\-\\d+$</exclude> <!-- exclude pact files where the name ends in a dash followed by a number --> </excludes> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ### Overriding the handling of a body data type **NOTE: version 4.1.3+** By default, bodies will be handled based on their content types. For binary contents, the bodies will be base64 encoded when written to the Pact file and then decoded again when the file is loaded. You can change this with an override property: `pact.content_type.override.<TYPE>.<SUBTYPE>=text|binary`. For instance, setting `pact.content_type.override.application.pdf=text` will treat PDF bodies as a text type and not encode/decode them. # Publishing verification results to a Pact Broker For pacts that are loaded from a Pact Broker, the results of running the verification can be published back to the broker against the URL for the pact. You will be able to then see the result on the Pact Broker home screen. To turn on the verification publishing, set the system property `pact.verifier.publishResults` to `true` in the pact maven plugin, not surefire, configuration. ## Tagging the provider before verification results are published [4.0.1+] You can have a tag pushed against the provider version before the verification results are published. To do this you need set the `pact.provider.tag` JVM system property to the tag value. From 4.1.8+, you can specify multiple tags with a comma separated string for the `pact.provider.tag` system property. # Enabling other verification reports By default the verification report is written to the console. You can also enable a JSON or Markdown report by setting the `reports` configuration list. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <reports> <report>console</report> <report>json</report> <report>markdown</report> </reports> </configuration> </plugin> ``` These reports will be written to `target/reports/pact`. # Pending Pact Support (version 4.1.0 and later) If your Pact broker supports pending pacts, you can enable support for that by enabling that on your Pact broker annotation or with JVM system properties. You also need to provide the tags that will be published with your provider's verification results. The broker will then label any pacts found that don't have a successful verification result as pending. That way, if they fail verification, the verifier will ignore those failures and not fail the build. For example: ```xml <pactBroker> <url>https://test.pactflow.io/</url> <tags> <tag>test</tag> </tags> <enablePending> <providerTags> <tag>master</tag> </providerTags> </enablePending> </pactBroker> ``` Then any pending pacts will not cause a build failure.

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URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
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Dependencies maven-plugin-api, maven-plugin-annotations, maven-core, kotlin-stdlib, kotlin-reflect, provider,
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lein from group au.com.dius.pact.provider (version 4.2.0-beta.0)

# Leiningen plugin to verify a provider Leiningen plugin for verifying pacts against a provider. The plugin provides a `pact-verify` task which will verify all configured pacts against your provider. ## To Use It ### 1. Add the plugin to your project plugins, preferably in it's own profile. ```clojure :profiles { :pact { :plugins [[au.com.dius.pact.provider/lein "4.1.0" :exclusions [commons-logging]]] :dependencies [[ch.qos.logback/logback-core "1.1.3"] [ch.qos.logback/logback-classic "1.1.3"] [org.apache.httpcomponents/httpclient "4.4.1"]] }}} ``` ### 2. Define the pacts between your consumers and providers You define all the providers and consumers within the `:pact` configuration element of your project. ```clojure :pact { :service-providers { ; You can define as many as you need, but each must have a unique name :provider1 { ; All the provider properties are optional, and have sensible defaults (shown below) :protocol "http" :host "localhost" :port 8080 :path "/" :has-pact-with { ; Again, you can define as many consumers for each provider as you need, but each must have a unique name :consumer1 { ; pact file can be either a path or an URL :pact-file "path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json" } } } } } ``` ### 3. Execute `lein with-profile pact pact-verify` You will have to have your provider running for this to pass. ## Enabling insecure SSL For providers that are running on SSL with self-signed certificates, you need to enable insecure SSL mode by setting `:insecure true` on the provider. ```clojure :pact { :service-providers { :provider1 { :protocol "https" :host "localhost" :port 8443 :insecure true :has-pact-with { :consumer1 { :pact-file "path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json" } } } } } ``` ## Specifying a custom trust store For environments that are running their own certificate chains: ```clojure :pact { :service-providers { :provider1 { :protocol "https" :host "localhost" :port 8443 :trust-store "relative/path/to/trustStore.jks" :trust-store-password "changeme" :has-pact-with { :consumer1 { :pact-file "path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json" } } } } } ``` `:trust-store` is relative to the current working (build) directory. `:trust-store-password` defaults to `changeit`. NOTE: The hostname will still be verified against the certificate. ## Modifying the requests before they are sent Sometimes you may need to add things to the requests that can't be persisted in a pact file. Examples of these would be authentication tokens, which have a small life span. The Leiningen plugin provides a request filter that can be set to an anonymous function on the provider that will be called before the request is made. This function will receive the HttpRequest object as a parameter. ```clojure :pact { :service-providers { :provider1 { ; function that adds an Authorization header to each request :request-filter #(.addHeader % "Authorization" "oauth-token eyJhbGciOiJSUzI1NiIsIm...") :has-pact-with { :consumer1 { :pact-file "path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json" } } } } } ``` __*Important Note:*__ You should only use this feature for things that can not be persisted in the pact file. By modifying the request, you are potentially modifying the contract from the consumer tests! ## Modifying the HTTP Client Used The default HTTP client is used for all requests to providers (created with a call to `HttpClients.createDefault()`). This can be changed by specifying a function assigned to `:create-client` on the provider that returns a `CloseableHttpClient`. The function will receive the provider info as a parameter. ## Turning off URL decoding of the paths in the pact file By default the paths loaded from the pact file will be decoded before the request is sent to the provider. To turn this behaviour off, set the system property `pact.verifier.disableUrlPathDecoding` to `true`. __*Important Note:*__ If you turn off the url path decoding, you need to ensure that the paths in the pact files are correctly encoded. The verifier will not be able to make a request with an invalid encoded path. ## Plugin Properties The following plugin options can be specified on the command line: |Property|Description| |--------|-----------| |:pact.showStacktrace|This turns on stacktrace printing for each request. It can help with diagnosing network errors| |:pact.showFullDiff|This turns on displaying the full diff of the expected versus actual bodies| |:pact.filter.consumers|Comma seperated list of consumer names to verify| |:pact.filter.description|Only verify interactions whose description match the provided regular expression| |:pact.filter.providerState|Only verify interactions whose provider state match the provided regular expression. An empty string matches interactions that have no state| |:pact.verifier.publishResults|Publishing of verification results will be skipped unless this property is set to 'true'| |:pact.matching.wildcard|Enables matching of map values ignoring the keys when this property is set to 'true'| Example, to run verification only for a particular consumer: ``` $ lein with-profile pact pact-verify :pact.filter.consumers=:consumer2 ``` ## Provider States For each provider you can specify a state change URL to use to switch the state of the provider. This URL will receive the `providerState` description from the pact file before each interaction via a POST. The `:state-change-uses-body` controls if the state is passed in the request body or as a query parameter. These values can be set at the provider level, or for a specific consumer. Consumer values take precedent if both are given. ```clojure :pact { :service-providers { :provider1 { :state-change-url "http://localhost:8080/tasks/pactStateChange" :state-change-uses-body false ; defaults to true :has-pact-with { :consumer1 { :pact-file "path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json" } } } } } ``` If the `:state-change-uses-body` is not specified, or is set to true, then the provider state description will be sent as JSON in the body of the request. If it is set to false, it will passed as a query parameter. As for normal requests (see Modifying the requests before they are sent), a state change request can be modified before it is sent. Set `:state-change-request-filter` to an anonymous function on the provider that will be called before the request is made. #### Returning values that can be injected You can have values from the provider state callbacks be injected into most places (paths, query parameters, headers, bodies, etc.). This works by using the V3 spec generators with provider state callbacks that return values. One example of where this would be useful is API calls that require an ID which would be auto-generated by the database on the provider side, so there is no way to know what the ID would be beforehand. There are methods on the consumer DSLs that can provider an expression that contains variables (like '/api/user/${id}' for the path). The provider state callback can then return a map for values, and the `id` attribute from the map will be expanded in the expression. For URL callbacks, the values need to be returned as JSON in the response body. ## Filtering the interactions that are verified You can filter the interactions that are run using three properties: `:pact.filter.consumers`, `:pact.filter.description` and `:pact.filter.providerState`. Adding `:pact.filter.consumers=:consumer1,:consumer2` to the command line will only run the pact files for those consumers (consumer1 and consumer2). Adding `:pact.filter.description=a request for payment.*` will only run those interactions whose descriptions start with 'a request for payment'. `:pact.filter.providerState=.*payment` will match any interaction that has a provider state that ends with payment, and `:pact.filter.providerState=` will match any interaction that does not have a provider state. ## Starting and shutting down your provider For the pact verification to run, the provider needs to be running. Leiningen provides a `do` task that can chain tasks together. So, by creating a `start-app` and `terminate-app` alias, you could so something like: $ lein with-profile pact do start-app, pact-verify, terminate-app However, if the pact verification fails the build will abort without running the `terminate-app` task. To have the start and terminate tasks always run regardless of the state of the verification, you can assign them to `:start-provider-task` and `:terminate-provider-task` on the provider. ```clojure :aliases {"start-app" ^{:doc "Starts the app"} ["tasks to start app ..."] ; insert tasks to start the app here "terminate-app" ^{:doc "Kills the app"} ["tasks to terminate app ..."] ; insert tasks to stop the app here } :pact { :service-providers { :provider1 { :start-provider-task "start-app" :terminate-provider-task "terminate-app" :has-pact-with { :consumer1 { :pact-file "path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json" } } } } } ``` Then you can just run: $ lein with-profile pact pact-verify and the `start-app` and `terminate-app` tasks will run before and after the provider verification. ## Specifying the provider hostname at runtime If you need to calculate the provider hostname at runtime (for instance it is run as a new docker container or AWS instance), you can give an anonymous function as the provider host that returns the host name. The function will receive the provider information as a parameter. ```clojure :pact { :service-providers { :provider1 { :host #(calculate-host-name %) :has-pact-with { :consumer1 { :pact-file "path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json" } } } } } ```

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junit5spring from group au.com.dius.pact.provider (version 4.2.0-beta.0)

# Pact Spring/JUnit5 Support This module extends the base [Pact JUnit5 module](/provider/junit5/README.md). See that for more details. For writing Spring Pact verification tests with JUnit 5, there is an JUnit 5 Invocation Context Provider that you can use with the `@TestTemplate` annotation. This will generate a test for each interaction found for the pact files for the provider. To use it, add the `@Provider` and `@ExtendWith(SpringExtension.class)` and one of the pact source annotations to your test class (as per a JUnit 5 test), then add a method annotated with `@TestTemplate` and `@ExtendWith(PactVerificationSpringProvider.class)` that takes a `PactVerificationContext` parameter. You will need to call `verifyInteraction()` on the context parameter in your test template method. For example: ```java @ExtendWith(SpringExtension.class) @SpringBootTest(webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.DEFINED_PORT) @Provider("Animal Profile Service") @PactBroker public class ContractVerificationTest { @TestTemplate @ExtendWith(PactVerificationSpringProvider.class) void pactVerificationTestTemplate(PactVerificationContext context) { context.verifyInteraction(); } } ``` You will now be able to setup all the required properties using the Spring context, e.g. creating an application YAML file in the test resources: ```yaml pactbroker: host: your.broker.host auth: username: broker-user password: broker.password ``` You can also run pact tests against `MockMvc` without need to spin up the whole application context which takes time and often requires more additional setup (e.g. database). In order to run lightweight tests just use `@WebMvcTest` from Spring and `MockMvcTestTarget` as a test target before each test. For example: ```java @WebMvcTest @Provider("myAwesomeService") @PactBroker class ContractVerificationTest { @Autowired private MockMvc mockMvc; @TestTemplate @ExtendWith(PactVerificationInvocationContextProvider.class) void pactVerificationTestTemplate(PactVerificationContext context) { context.verifyInteraction(); } @BeforeEach void before(PactVerificationContext context) { context.setTarget(new MockMvcTestTarget(mockMvc)); } } ``` You can also use `MockMvcTestTarget` for tests without spring context by providing the controllers manually. For example: ```java @Provider("myAwesomeService") @PactFolder("pacts") class MockMvcTestTargetStandaloneMockMvcTestJava { @TestTemplate @ExtendWith(PactVerificationInvocationContextProvider.class) void pactVerificationTestTemplate(PactVerificationContext context) { context.verifyInteraction(); } @BeforeEach void before(PactVerificationContext context) { MockMvcTestTarget testTarget = new MockMvcTestTarget(); testTarget.setControllers(new DataResource()); context.setTarget(testTarget); } @RestController static class DataResource { @GetMapping("/data") @ResponseStatus(HttpStatus.NO_CONTENT) void getData(@RequestParam("ticketId") String ticketId) { } } } ``` **Important:** Since `@WebMvcTest` starts only Spring MVC components you can't use `PactVerificationSpringProvider` and need to fallback to `PactVerificationInvocationContextProvider`

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junit5 from group au.com.dius.pact.provider (version 4.2.0-beta.0)

# Pact Junit 5 Extension ## Dependency The library is available on maven central using: * group-id = `au.com.dius.pact.provider` * artifact-id = `junit5` * version-id = `4.1.x` ## Overview For writing Pact verification tests with JUnit 5, there is an JUnit 5 Invocation Context Provider that you can use with the `@TestTemplate` annotation. This will generate a test for each interaction found for the pact files for the provider. To use it, add the `@Provider` and one of the pact source annotations to your test class (as per a JUnit 4 test), then add a method annotated with `@TestTemplate` and `@ExtendWith(PactVerificationInvocationContextProvider.class)` that takes a `PactVerificationContext` parameter. You will need to call `verifyInteraction()` on the context parameter in your test template method. For example: ```java @Provider("myAwesomeService") @PactFolder("pacts") public class ContractVerificationTest { @TestTemplate @ExtendWith(PactVerificationInvocationContextProvider.class) void pactVerificationTestTemplate(PactVerificationContext context) { context.verifyInteraction(); } } ``` For details on the provider and pact source annotations, refer to the [Pact junit runner](../junit/README.md) docs. ## Test target You can set the test target (the object that defines the target of the test, which should point to your provider) on the `PactVerificationContext`, but you need to do this in a before test method (annotated with `@BeforeEach`). There are three different test targets you can use: `HttpTestTarget`, `HttpsTestTarget` and `MessageTestTarget`. For example: ```java @BeforeEach void before(PactVerificationContext context) { context.setTarget(HttpTestTarget.fromUrl(new URL(myProviderUrl))); // or something like // context.setTarget(new HttpTestTarget("localhost", myProviderPort, "/")); } ``` **Note for Maven users:** If you use Maven to run your tests, you will have to make sure that the Maven Surefire plugin is at least version 2.22.1 uses an isolated classpath. For example, configure it by adding the following to your POM: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId> <version>2.22.1</version> <configuration> <useSystemClassLoader>false</useSystemClassLoader> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ## Provider State Methods Provider State Methods work in the same way as with JUnit 4 tests, refer to the [Pact junit runner](../junit/README.md) docs. ### Using multiple classes for the state change methods If you have a large number of state change methods, you can split things up by moving them to other classes. You will need to specify the additional classes on the test context in a `Before` method. Do this with the `withStateHandler` or `setStateHandlers` methods. See [StateAnnotationsOnAdditionalClassTest](https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm/blob/master/provider/junit5/src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/provider/junit5/StateAnnotationsOnAdditionalClassTest.java) for an example. ## Modifying the requests before they are sent **Important Note:** You should only use this feature for things that can not be persisted in the pact file. By modifying the request, you are potentially modifying the contract from the consumer tests! **NOTE: JUnit 5 tests do not use `@TargetRequestFilter`** Sometimes you may need to add things to the requests that can't be persisted in a pact file. Examples of these would be authentication tokens, which have a small life span. The Http and Https test targets support injecting the request that will executed into the test template method. You can then add things to the request before calling the `verifyInteraction()` method. For example to add a header: ```java @TestTemplate @ExtendWith(PactVerificationInvocationContextProvider.class) void testTemplate(PactVerificationContext context, HttpRequest request) { // This will add a header to the request request.addHeader("X-Auth-Token", "1234"); context.verifyInteraction(); } ``` ## Objects that can be injected into the test methods You can inject the following objects into your test methods (just like the `PactVerificationContext`). They will be null if injected before the supported phase. | Object | Can be injected from phase | Description | | ------ | --------------- | ----------- | | PactVerificationContext | @BeforeEach | The context to use to execute the interaction test | | Pact | any | The Pact model for the test | | Interaction | any | The Interaction model for the test | | HttpRequest | @TestTemplate | The request that is going to be executed (only for HTTP and HTTPS targets) | | ProviderVerifier | @TestTemplate | The verifier instance that is used to verify the interaction | ## Allowing the test to pass when no pacts are found to verify (version 4.0.7+) By default, the test will fail with an exception if no pacts were found to verify. This can be overridden by adding the `@IgnoreNoPactsToVerify` annotation to the test class. For this to work, you test class will need to be able to receive null values for any of the injected parameters. ## Overriding the handling of a body data type **NOTE: version 4.1.3+** By default, bodies will be handled based on their content types. For binary contents, the bodies will be base64 encoded when written to the Pact file and then decoded again when the file is loaded. You can change this with an override property: `pact.content_type.override.<TYPE>.<SUBTYPE>=text|binary`. For instance, setting `pact.content_type.override.application.pdf=text` will treat PDF bodies as a text type and not encode/decode them. # Pending Pact Support (version 4.1.0 and later) If your Pact broker supports pending pacts, you can enable support for that by enabling that on your Pact broker annotation or with JVM system properties. You also need to provide the tags that will be published with your provider's verification results. The broker will then label any pacts found that don't have a successful verification result as pending. That way, if they fail verification, the verifier will ignore those failures and not fail the build. For example, with annotation: ```java @Provider("Activity Service") @PactBroker(host = "test.pactflow.io", tags = {"test"}, scheme = "https", enablePendingPacts = "true", providerTags = "master" ) public class PactJUnitTest { ``` You can also use the `pactbroker.enablePending` and `pactbroker.providerTags` JVM system properties. Then any pending pacts will not cause a build failure. # Work In Progress (WIP) Pact Support (version 4.1.5 and later) WIP pacts work in the same way as with JUnit 4 tests, refer to the [Pact junit runner](../junit/README.md) docs.

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Artifact junit5
Group au.com.dius.pact.provider
Version 4.2.0-beta.0
Last update 18. October 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 3
Dependencies junit-jupiter-api, support, provider,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

junit from group au.com.dius.pact.provider (version 4.2.0-beta.0)

# Pact junit runner ## Dependency The library is available on maven central using: * group-id = `au.com.dius.pact.provider` * artifact-id = `junit` * version-id = `4.1.x` ## Overview Library provides ability to play contract tests against a provider service in JUnit fashionable way. Supports: - Out-of-the-box convenient ways to load pacts - Easy way to change assertion strategy - **org.junit.BeforeClass**, **org.junit.AfterClass** and **org.junit.ClassRule** JUnit annotations, that will be run once - before/after whole contract test suite. - **org.junit.Before**, **org.junit.After** and **org.junit.Rule** JUnit annotations, that will be run before/after each test of an interaction. - **au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.State** custom annotation - before each interaction that requires a state change, all methods annotated by `@State` with appropriate the state listed will be invoked. These methods must either take no parameters or a single Map parameter. ## Example of HTTP test ```java @RunWith(PactRunner.class) // Say JUnit to run tests with custom Runner @Provider("myAwesomeService") // Set up name of tested provider @PactFolder("pacts") // Point where to find pacts (See also section Pacts source in documentation) public class ContractTest { // NOTE: this is just an example of embedded service that listens to requests, you should start here real service @ClassRule //Rule will be applied once: before/after whole contract test suite public static final ClientDriverRule embeddedService = new ClientDriverRule(8332); @BeforeClass //Method will be run once: before whole contract test suite public static void setUpService() { //Run DB, create schema //Run service //... } @Before //Method will be run before each test of interaction public void before() { // Rest data // Mock dependent service responses // ... embeddedService.addExpectation( onRequestTo("/data"), giveEmptyResponse() ); } @State("default", "no-data") // Method will be run before testing interactions that require "default" or "no-data" state public void toDefaultState() { // Prepare service before interaction that require "default" state // ... System.out.println("Now service in default state"); } @State("with-data") // Method will be run before testing interactions that require "with-data" state public void toStateWithData(Map data) { // Prepare service before interaction that require "with-data" state. The provider state data will be passed // in the data parameter // ... System.out.println("Now service in state using data " + data); } @TestTarget // Annotation denotes Target that will be used for tests public final Target target = new HttpTarget(8332); // Out-of-the-box implementation of Target (for more information take a look at Test Target section) } ``` ## Example of Message test ```java @RunWith(PactRunner.class) // Say JUnit to run tests with custom Runner @Provider("myAwesomeService") // Set up name of tested provider @PactBroker(host="pactbroker", port = "80") public class ConfirmationKafkaContractTest { @TestTarget // Annotation denotes Target that will be used for tests public final Target target = new MessageTarget(); // Out-of-the-box implementation of Target (for more information take a look at Test Target section) @BeforeClass //Method will be run once: before whole contract test suite public static void setUpService() { //Run DB, create schema //Run service //... } @Before //Method will be run before each test of interaction public void before() { // Message data preparation // ... } @PactVerifyProvider('an order confirmation message') String verifyMessageForOrder() { Order order = new Order() order.setId(10000004) order.setPrice(BigDecimal.TEN) order.setUnits(15) def message = new ConfirmationKafkaMessageBuilder() .withOrder(order) .build() JsonOutput.toJson(message) } } ``` ### Example of Message test that verifies metadata To have the message metadata - such as the topic - also verified you need to return a `MessageAndMetadata` from the invoked method that contains the payload and metadata to be validation. For example, to verify the metadata of an integration using the Spring [Message](https://docs.spring.io/spring-integration/reference/html/message.html) interface, you can do something like the following: ```java ... @PactVerifyProvider("a product event update") public MessageAndMetadata verifyMessageForOrder() { ProductEvent product = new ProductEvent("id1", "product name", "product type", "v1", EventType.CREATED); Message<String> message = new ProductMessageBuilder().withProduct(product).build(); return generateMessageAndMetadata(message); } private MessageAndMetadata generateMessageAndMetadata(Message<String> message) { HashMap<String, Object> metadata = new HashMap<String, Object>(); message.getHeaders().forEach((k, v) -> metadata.put(k, v)); return new MessageAndMetadata(message.getPayload().getBytes(), metadata); } ``` _NOTE: this requires you to add medadata expections in your consumer test_ ## Provider state callback methods For the provider states in the pact being verified, you can define methods to be invoked to setup the correct state for each interaction. Just annotate a method with the `au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.State` annotation and the method will be invoked before the interaction is verified. For example: ```java @State("SomeProviderState") // Must match the state description in the pact file public void someProviderState() { // Do what you need to set the correct state } ``` If there are parameters in the pact file, just add a Map parameter to the method to be able to access those parameters. ```java @State("SomeProviderState") public void someProviderState(Map<String, Object> providerStateParameters) { // Do what you need to set the correct state } ``` ### Provider state teardown methods If you need to tear down your provider state, you can annotate a method with the `@State` annotation with the action set to `StateChangeAction.TEARDOWN` and it will be invoked after the interaction is verified. ```java @State("SomeProviderState", action = StateChangeAction.TEARDOWN) public void someProviderStateCleanup() { // Do what you need to to teardown the state } ``` #### Returning values that can be injected You can have values from the provider state callbacks be injected into most places (paths, query parameters, headers, bodies, etc.). This works by using the V3 spec generators with provider state callbacks that return values. One example of where this would be useful is API calls that require an ID which would be auto-generated by the database on the provider side, so there is no way to know what the ID would be beforehand. There are methods on the consumer DSLs that can provider an expression that contains variables (like '/api/user/${id}' for the path). The provider state callback can then return a map for values, and the `id` attribute from the map will be expanded in the expression. For this to work, just make your provider state method return a Map of the values. ### Using multiple classes for the state change methods If you have a large number of state change methods, you can split things up by moving them to other classes. There are two ways you can do this: #### Use interfaces You can put the state change methods on interfaces and then have your test class implement those interfaces. See [StateAnnotationsOnInterfaceTest](https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm/blob/master/provider/junit/src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/provider/junit/StateAnnotationsOnInterfaceTest.java) for an example. #### Specify the additional classes on the test target You can provide the additional classes to the test target with the `withStateHandler` or `setStateHandlers` methods. See [BooksPactProviderTest](https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm/blob/master/provider/spring/src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/provider/spring/BooksPactProviderTest.java) for an example. ## Pact source The Pact runner will automatically collect pacts based on annotations on the test class. For this purpose there are 3 out-of-the-box options (files from a directory, files from a set of URLs or a pact broker) or you can easily add your own Pact source. If you need to load a single pact file from the file system, use the `PactUrl` with the URL set to the file path. **Note:** You can only define one source of pacts per test class. ### Download pacts from a pact-broker To use pacts from a Pact Broker, annotate the test class with `@PactBroker(host="host.of.pact.broker.com", port = "80")`. You can also specify the protocol, which defaults to "http". The pact broker will be queried for all pacts with the same name as the provider annotation. For example, test all pacts for the "Activity Service" in the pact broker: ```java @RunWith(PactRunner.class) @Provider("Activity Service") @PactBroker(host = "localhost", port = "80") public class PactJUnitTest { @TestTarget public final Target target = new HttpTarget(5050); } ``` #### Using Java System properties The pact broker loader was updated to allow system properties to be used for the hostname, port or protocol. The port was changed to a string to allow expressions to be set. To use a system property or environment variable, you can place the property name in `${}` expression de-markers: ```java @PactBroker(host="${pactbroker.hostname}", port = "80") ``` You can provide a default value by separating the property name with a colon (`:`): ```java @PactBroker(host="${pactbroker.hostname:localhost}", port = "80") ``` #### More Java System properties The default values of the `@PactBroker` annotation now enable variable interpolation. The following keys may be managed through the environment * `pactbroker.host` * `pactbroker.port` * `pactbroker.scheme` * `pactbroker.tags` (comma separated) * `pactbroker.auth.username` (for basic auth) * `pactbroker.auth.password` (for basic auth) * `pactbroker.auth.token` (for bearer auth) * `pactbroker.consumers` (comma separated list to filter pacts by consumer; if not provided, will fetch all pacts for the provider) #### Using tags with the pact broker The pact broker allows different versions to be tagged. To load all the pacts: ```java @PactBroker(host="pactbroker", port = "80", tags = {"latest", "dev", "prod"}) ``` The default value for tags is `latest` which is not actually a tag but instead corresponds to the latest version ignoring the tags. If there are multiple consumers matching the name specified in the provider annotation then the latest pact for each of the consumers is loaded. For any other value the latest pact tagged with the specified tag is loaded. Specifying multiple tags is an OR operation. For example if you specify `tags = {"dev", "prod"}` then both the latest pact file tagged with `dev` and the latest pact file taggged with `prod` is loaded. In 4.1.4+, tags was deprecated in favor of consumerVersionSelectors. Consumer version selectors give you the ability to include pacts for the latest version of a tag, or all versions of a tag. ```java @PactBroker( host="pactbroker", port="80", consumerVersionSelectors={ @ConsumerVersionSelector(tag = "dev"), // Verify the latest version tagged with dev @ConsumerVersionSelector(tag = "prod", latest = "false") // Verify all versions tagged with prod } ) ``` #### Using authentication with the with the pact broker You can use basic authentication with the `@PactBroker` annotation by setting the `authentication` value to a `@PactBrokerAuth` annotation. For example: ```java @PactBroker(host = "${pactbroker.url:localhost}", port = "1234", tags = {"latest", "prod", "dev"}, authentication = @PactBrokerAuth(username = "test", password = "test")) ``` Bearer tokens are also supported. For example: ```java @PactBroker(host = "${pactbroker.url:localhost}", port = "1234", tags = {"latest", "prod", "dev"}, authentication = @PactBrokerAuth(token = "test")) ``` The `token`, `username` and `password` values also take Java system property expressions. Preemptive Authentication can be enabled by setting the `pact.pactbroker.httpclient.usePreemptiveAuthentication` Java system property to `true`. ### Allowing just the changed pact specified in a webhook to be verified [4.0.6+] When a consumer publishes a new version of a pact file, the Pact broker can fire off a webhook with the URL of the changed pact file. To allow only the changed pact file to be verified, you can override the URL by adding the annotation `@AllowOverridePactUrl` to your test class and then setting using the `pact.filter.consumers` and `pact.filter.pacturl` values as either Java system properties or environment variables. If you have annotated your test class with `@Consumer` you don't need to provide `pact.filter.consumers`. ### Pact Url To use pacts from urls annotate the test class with ```java @PactUrl(urls = {"http://build.server/zoo_app-animal_service.json"}) ``` If you need to load a single pact file from the file system, you can use the `PactUrl` with the URL set to the file path. For authenticated URLs, specify the authentication on the annotation ```java @PactUrl(urls = {"http://build.server/zoo_app-animal_service.json"}, authentication = @Authentication(token = "1234ABCD")) ``` You can use either bearer token scheme (by setting the `token`), or basic auth by setting the `username` and `password`. JVM system properties or environment variables can also be used by placing the property/variable name in `${}` expressions. ```java @PactUrl(urls = {"http://build.server/zoo_app-animal_service.json"}, authentication = @Authentication(token = "${TOKEN}")) ``` ### Pact folder To use pacts from a resource folder of the project annotate test class with ```java @PactFolder("subfolder/in/resource/directory") ``` ### Custom pacts source It's possible to use a custom Pact source. For this, implement interface `au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.loader.PactLoader` and annotate the test class with `@PactSource(MyOwnPactLoader.class)`. **Note:** class `MyOwnPactLoader` must have a default empty constructor or a constructor with one argument of class `Class` which at runtime will be the test class so you can get custom annotations of test class. ### Filtering the interactions that are verified By default, the pact runner will verify all pacts for the given provider. You can filter the pacts and interactions by the following methods. #### Filtering by Consumer You can run only those pacts for a particular consumer by adding a `@Consumer` annotation to the test class. For example: ```java @RunWith(PactRunner.class) @Provider("Activity Service") @Consumer("Activity Consumer") @PactBroker(host = "localhost", port = "80") public class PactJUnitTest { @TestTarget public final Target target = new HttpTarget(5050); } ``` #### Interaction Filtering You can filter the interactions that are executed by adding a `@PactFilter` annotation to your test class. The pact filter annotation will then only verify interactions that have a matching value, by default provider state. You can provide multiple values to match with. The filter criteria is defined by the filter property. The filter must implement the `au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.filter.InteractionFilter` interface. Also check the `InteractionFilter` interface for default filter implementations. For example: ```java @RunWith(PactRunner.class) @PactFilter("Activity 100 exists in the database") public class PactJUnitTest { } ``` You can also use regular expressions with the filter. For example: ```java @RunWith(PactRunner.class) @PactFilter(values = {"^\\/somepath.*"}, filter = InteractionFilter.ByRequestPath.class) public class PactJUnitTest { } ``` **NOTE!** You will only be able to publish the verification results if all interactions have been verified. If an interaction is not covered because it was filtered out, you will not be able to publish. ##### Filtering the interactions that are run **(version 4.1.2+)** You can filter the interactions that are run by setting the JVM system property `pact.filter.description`. This propery takes a regular expression to match against the interaction description. **NOTE!** this property needs to be set on the test JVM if your build is running with Gradle or Maven. ### Setting the test to not fail when no pacts are found By default the pact runner will fail the verification test if no pact files are found to verify. To change the failure into a warning, add a `@IgnoreNoPactsToVerify` annotation to your test class. #### Ignoring IO errors loading pact files You can also set the test to ignore any IO and parser exceptions when loading the pact files by setting the `ignoreIoErrors` attribute on the annotation to `"true"` or setting the JVM system property `pact.verification.ignoreIoErrors` to `true`. ** WARNING! Do not enable this on your CI server, as this could result in your build passing with no providers having been verified due to a configuration error. ** ### Overriding the handling of a body data type **NOTE: version 4.1.3+** By default, bodies will be handled based on their content types. For binary contents, the bodies will be base64 encoded when written to the Pact file and then decoded again when the file is loaded. You can change this with an override property: `pact.content_type.override.<TYPE>.<SUBTYPE>=text|binary`. For instance, setting `pact.content_type.override.application.pdf=text` will treat PDF bodies as a text type and not encode/decode them. ## Test target The field in test class of type `au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.target.Target` annotated with `au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.target.TestTarget` will be used for actual Interaction execution and asserting of contract. **Note:** there must be exactly 1 such field, otherwise an `InitializationException` will be thrown. ### HttpTarget `au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.target.HttpTarget` - out-of-the-box implementation of `au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.target.Target` that will play pacts as http request and assert response from service by matching rules from pact. You can also specify the protocol, defaults to "http". ### MessageTarget `au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.target.MessageTarget` - out-of-the-box implementation of `au.com.dius.pact.provider.junit.target.Target` that will play pacts as an message and assert response from service by matching rules from pact. **Note for Maven users:** If you use Maven to run your tests, you will have to make sure that the Maven Surefire plugin is at least version 2.22.1 uses an isolated classpath. For example, configure it by adding the following to your POM: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId> <version>2.22.1</version> <configuration> <useSystemClassLoader>false</useSystemClassLoader> </configuration> </plugin> ``` #### Modifying the requests before they are sent **NOTE: `@TargetRequestFilter` is only for JUnit 4. For JUnit 5 see [JUnit 5 docs](/provider/junit5/README.md#modifying-the-requests-before-they-are-sent).** Sometimes you may need to add things to the requests that can't be persisted in a pact file. Examples of these would be authentication tokens, which have a small life span. The HttpTarget supports request filters by annotating methods on the test class with `@TargetRequestFilter`. These methods must be public void methods that take a single HttpRequest parameter. For example: ```java @TargetRequestFilter public void exampleRequestFilter(HttpRequest request) { request.addHeader("Authorization", "OAUTH hdsagasjhgdjashgdah..."); } ``` __*Important Note:*__ You should only use this feature for things that can not be persisted in the pact file. By modifying the request, you are potentially modifying the contract from the consumer tests! #### Turning off URL decoding of the paths in the pact file By default the paths loaded from the pact file will be decoded before the request is sent to the provider. To turn this behaviour off, set the system property `pact.verifier.disableUrlPathDecoding` to `true`. __*Important Note:*__ If you turn off the url path decoding, you need to ensure that the paths in the pact files are correctly encoded. The verifier will not be able to make a request with an invalid encoded path. ### Custom Test Target It's possible to use custom `Target`, for that interface `Target` should be implemented and this class can be used instead of `HttpTarget`. # Verification Reports The default test behaviour is to display the verification being done to the console, and pass or fail the test via the normal JUnit mechanism. Additional reports can be generated from the tests. ## Enabling additional reports via annotations on the test classes A `@VerificationReports` annotation can be added to any pact test class which will control the verification output. The annotation takes a list report types and an optional report directory (defaults to "target/pact/reports"). The currently supported report types are `console`, `markdown` and `json`. For example: ```java @VerificationReports({"console", "markdown"}) public class MyPactTest { ``` will enable the markdown report in addition to the normal console output. And, ```java @VerificationReports(value = {"markdown"}, reportDir = "/myreports") public class MyPactTest { ``` will disable the normal console output and write the markdown reports to "/myreports". ## Enabling additional reports via Java system properties or environment variables The additional reports can also be enabled with Java System properties or environment variables. The following two properties have been introduced: `pact.verification.reports` and `pact.verification.reportDir`. `pact.verification.reports` is the comma separated list of report types to enable (e.g. `console,json,markdown`). `pact.verification.reportDir` is the directory to write reports to (defaults to "target/pact/reports"). ## Additional Reports The following report types are available in addition to console output (`console`, which is enabled by default): `markdown`, `json`. You can also provide a fully qualified classname as report so custom reports are also supported. This class must implement `au.com.dius.pact.provider.reporters.VerifierReporter` interface in order to be correct custom implementation of a report. # Publishing verification results to a Pact Broker For pacts that are loaded from a Pact Broker, the results of running the verification can be published back to the broker against the URL for the pact. You will be able to see the result on the Pact Broker home screen. You need to set the version of the provider that is verified using the `pact.provider.version` system property. To enable publishing of results, set the Java system property or environment variable `pact.verifier.publishResults` to `true`. ## Tagging the provider before verification results are published [4.0.1+] You can have a tag pushed against the provider version before the verification results are published. To do this you need set the `pact.provider.tag` JVM system property to the tag value. From 4.1.8+, you can specify multiple tags with a comma separated string for the `pact.provider.tag` system property. # Pending Pact Support (version 4.1.3 and later) If your Pact broker supports pending pacts, you can enable support for that by enabling that on your Pact broker annotation or with JVM system properties. You also need to provide the tags that will be published with your provider's verification results. The broker will then label any pacts found that don't have a successful verification result as pending. That way, if they fail verification, the verifier will ignore those failures and not fail the build. For example, with annotation: ```java @Provider("Activity Service") @PactBroker(host = "test.pactflow.io", tags = {"test"}, scheme = "https", enablePendingPacts = "true", providerTags = "master" ) public class PactJUnitTest { ``` You can also use the `pactbroker.enablePending` and `pactbroker.providerTags` JVM system properties. Then any pending pacts will not cause a build failure. # Work In Progress (WIP) Pact Support (version 4.1.5 and later) If your Pact broker supports wip pacts, you can enable support by enabling it on your Pact broker annotation, or with JVM system properties. You also need to enable pending pacts. Once enabled, your provider will verify any "work in progress" pacts that have been published since a given date. A WIP pact is a pact that is the latest for its tag that does not have any successful verification results with the provider tag. ```java @Provider("Activity Service") @PactBroker(host = "test.pactflow.io", tags = {"test"}, scheme = "https", enablePendingPacts = "true", providerTags = "master" includeWipPactsSince = "2020-06-19" ) public class PactJUnitTest { ``` You can also use the `pactbroker.includeWipPactsSince` JVM system property. Since all WIP pacts are also pending pacts, failed verifications will not cause a build failure.

Group: au.com.dius.pact.provider Artifact: junit
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Artifact junit
Group au.com.dius.pact.provider
Version 4.2.0-beta.0
Last update 18. October 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 9
Dependencies fluent-hc, httpclient, junit, commons-lang3, jool, guava-retrying, mail, support, provider,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

gradle from group au.com.dius.pact.provider (version 4.2.0-beta.0)

Gradle ====== Gradle plugin for verifying pacts against a provider. The Gradle plugin creates a task `pactVerify` to your build which will verify all configured pacts against your provider. __*Important Note: Any properties that need to be set when using the Gradle plugin need to be provided with `-P` and not `-D` as with the other Pact-JVM modules!*__ ## To Use It ### For Gradle versions 2.1+ ```groovy plugins { id "au.com.dius.pact" version "4.1.0" } ``` ### For Gradle versions prior to 2.1 #### 1.1. Add the gradle jar file to your build script class path: ```groovy buildscript { repositories { mavenCentral() } dependencies { classpath 'au.com.dius.pact.provider:gradle:4.1.0' } } ``` #### 1.2. Apply the pact plugin ```groovy apply plugin: 'au.com.dius.pact' ``` ### 2. Define the pacts between your consumers and providers ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { // You can define as many as you need, but each must have a unique name provider1 { // All the provider properties are optional, and have sensible defaults (shown below) protocol = 'http' host = 'localhost' port = 8080 path = '/' // Again, you can define as many consumers for each provider as you need, but each must have a unique name hasPactWith('consumer1') { // currently supports a file path using file() or a URL using url() pactSource = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } // Or if you have many pact files in a directory hasPactsWith('manyConsumers') { // Will define a consumer for each pact file in the directory. // Consumer name is read from contents of pact file pactFileLocation = file('path/to/pacts') } } } } ``` ### 3. Execute `gradle pactVerify` # Project Properties The following project properties can be specified with `-Pproperty=value` on the command line: |Property|Description| |--------|-----------| |`pact.showStacktrace`|This turns on stacktrace printing for each request. It can help with diagnosing network errors| |`pact.showFullDiff`|This turns on displaying the full diff of the expected versus actual bodies| |`pact.filter.consumers`|Comma seperated list of consumer names to verify| |`pact.filter.description`|Only verify interactions whose description match the provided regular expression| |`pact.filter.providerState`|Only verify interactions whose provider state match the provided regular expression. An empty string matches interactions that have no state| |`pact.filter.pacturl`|This filter allows just the just the changed pact specified in a webhook to be run. It should be used in conjunction with `pact.filter.consumers` | |`pact.verifier.publishResults`|Publishing of verification results will be skipped unless this property is set to 'true'| |`pact.matching.wildcard`|Enables matching of map values ignoring the keys when this property is set to 'true'| |`pact.verifier.disableUrlPathDecoding`|Disables decoding of request paths| |`pact.pactbroker.httpclient.usePreemptiveAuthentication`|Enables preemptive authentication with the pact broker when set to `true`| |`pact.provider.tag`|Sets the provider tag to push before publishing verification results (can use a comma separated list)| |`pact.content_type.override.<TYPE>.<SUBTYPE>=<VAL>` where `<VAL>` may be `text` or `binary`|Overrides the handling of a particular content type [4.1.3+]| ## Specifying the provider hostname at runtime If you need to calculate the provider hostname at runtime, you can give a Closure as the provider `host`. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { host = { lookupHostName() } hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } } } } ``` You can also give a Closure as the provider `port`. ## Specifying the pact file or URL at runtime If you need to calculate the pact file or URL at runtime, you can give a Closure as the provider `pactFile`. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { host = 'localhost' hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = { lookupPactFile() } } } } } ``` ## Starting and shutting down your provider If you need to start-up or shutdown your provider, define Gradle tasks for each action and set `startProviderTask` and `terminateProviderTask` properties of each provider. You could use the jetty tasks here if you provider is built as a WAR file. ```groovy // This will be called before the provider task task('startTheApp') { doLast { // start up your provider here } } // This will be called after the provider task task('killTheApp') { doLast { // kill your provider here } } pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { startProviderTask = startTheApp terminateProviderTask = killTheApp hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } } } } ``` Following typical Gradle behaviour, you can set the provider task properties to the actual tasks, or to the task names as a string (for the case when they haven't been defined yet). ## Preventing the chaining of provider verify task to `pactVerify` Normally a gradle task named `pactVerify_${provider.name}` is created and added as a task dependency for `pactVerify`. You can disable this dependency on a provider by setting `isDependencyForPactVerify` to `false` (defaults to `true`). ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { isDependencyForPactVerify = false hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } } } } ``` To run this task, you would then have to explicitly name it as in ```gradle pactVerify_provider1```, a normal ```gradle pactVerify``` would skip it. This can be useful when you want to define two providers, one with `startProviderTask`/`terminateProviderTask` and as second without, so you can manually start your provider (to debug it from your IDE, for example) but still want a `pactVerify` to run normally from your CI build. ## Enabling insecure SSL For providers that are running on SSL with self-signed certificates, you need to enable insecure SSL mode by setting `insecure = true` on the provider. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { insecure = true // allow SSL with a self-signed cert hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } } } } ``` ## Specifying a custom trust store For environments that are running their own certificate chains: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { trustStore = new File('relative/path/to/trustStore.jks') trustStorePassword = 'changeit' hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } } } } ``` `trustStore` is either relative to the current working (build) directory. `trustStorePassword` defaults to `changeit`. NOTE: The hostname will still be verified against the certificate. ## Modifying the HTTP Client Used The default HTTP client is used for all requests to providers (created with a call to `HttpClients.createDefault()`). This can be changed by specifying a closure assigned to createClient on the provider that returns a CloseableHttpClient. For example: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { createClient = { provider -> // This will enable the client to accept self-signed certificates HttpClients.custom().setSSLHostnameVerifier(new NoopHostnameVerifier()) .setSslcontext(new SSLContextBuilder().loadTrustMaterial(null, { x509Certificates, s -> true }) .build()) .build() } hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } } } } ``` ## Modifying the requests before they are sent Sometimes you may need to add things to the requests that can't be persisted in a pact file. Examples of these would be authentication tokens, which have a small life span. The Pact Gradle plugin provides a request filter that can be set to a closure on the provider that will be called before the request is made. This closure will receive the HttpRequest prior to it being executed. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { requestFilter = { req -> // Add an authorization header to each request req.addHeader('Authorization', 'OAUTH eyJhbGciOiJSUzI1NiIsImN0eSI6ImFw...') } hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } } } } ``` __*Important Note:*__ You should only use this feature for things that can not be persisted in the pact file. By modifying the request, you are potentially modifying the contract from the consumer tests! ## Turning off URL decoding of the paths in the pact file By default the paths loaded from the pact file will be decoded before the request is sent to the provider. To turn this behaviour off, set the property `pact.verifier.disableUrlPathDecoding` to `true`. __*Important Note:*__ If you turn off the url path decoding, you need to ensure that the paths in the pact files are correctly encoded. The verifier will not be able to make a request with an invalid encoded path. ## Overriding the handling of a body data type **NOTE: version 4.1.3+** By default, bodies will be handled based on their content types. For binary contents, the bodies will be base64 encoded when written to the Pact file and then decoded again when the file is loaded. You can change this with an override property: `pact.content_type.override.<TYPE>.<SUBTYPE>=text|binary`. For instance, setting `pact.content_type.override.application.pdf=text` will treat PDF bodies as a text type and not encode/decode them. ## Provider States For a description of what provider states are, see the pact documentations: http://docs.pact.io/documentation/provider_states.html ### Using a state change URL For each provider you can specify a state change URL to use to switch the state of the provider. This URL will receive the providerState description and all the parameters from the pact file before each interaction via a POST. As for normal requests, a request filter (`stateChangeRequestFilter`) can also be set to manipulate the request before it is sent. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') stateChangeUrl = url('http://localhost:8001/tasks/pactStateChange') stateChangeUsesBody = false // defaults to true stateChangeRequestFilter = { req -> // Add an authorization header to each request req.addHeader('Authorization', 'OAUTH eyJhbGciOiJSUzI1NiIsImN0eSI6ImFw...') } } // or hasPactsWith('consumers') { pactFileLocation = file('path/to/pacts') stateChangeUrl = url('http://localhost:8001/tasks/pactStateChange') stateChangeUsesBody = false // defaults to true } } } } ``` If the `stateChangeUsesBody` is not specified, or is set to true, then the provider state description and parameters will be sent as JSON in the body of the request : ```json { "state" : "a provider state description", "params": { "a": "1", "b": "2" } } ``` If it is set to false, they will be passed as query parameters. #### Teardown calls for state changes You can enable teardown state change calls by setting the property `stateChangeTeardown = true` on the provider. This will add an `action` parameter to the state change call. The setup call before the test will receive `action=setup`, and then a teardown call will be made afterwards to the state change URL with `action=teardown`. ### Using a Closure You can set a closure to be called before each verification with a defined provider state. The closure will be called with the state description and parameters from the pact file. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') // Load a fixture file based on the provider state and then setup some database // data. Does not require a state change request so returns false stateChange = { providerState -> // providerState is an instance of ProviderState def fixture = loadFixtuerForProviderState(providerState) setupDatabase(fixture) } } } } } ``` #### Teardown calls for state changes You can enable teardown state change calls by setting the property `stateChangeTeardown = true` on the provider. This will add an `action` parameter to the state change closure call. The setup call before the test will receive `setup`, as the second parameter, and then a teardown call will be made afterwards with `teardown` as the second parameter. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') // Load a fixture file based on the provider state and then setup some database // data. Does not require a state change request so returns false stateChange = { providerState, action -> if (action == 'setup') { def fixture = loadFixtuerForProviderState(providerState) setupDatabase(fixture) } else { cleanupDatabase() } false } } } } } ``` #### Returning values that can be injected You can have values from the provider state callbacks be injected into most places (paths, query parameters, headers, bodies, etc.). This works by using the V3 spec generators with provider state callbacks that return values. One example of where this would be useful is API calls that require an ID which would be auto-generated by the database on the provider side, so there is no way to know what the ID would be beforehand. There are methods on the consumer DSLs that can provider an expression that contains variables (like '/api/user/${id}' for the path). The provider state callback can then return a map for values, and the `id` attribute from the map will be expanded in the expression. For URL callbacks, the values need to be returned as JSON in the response body. ## Filtering the interactions that are verified You can filter the interactions that are run using three project properties: `pact.filter.consumers`, `pact.filter.description` and `pact.filter.providerState`. Adding `-Ppact.filter.consumers=consumer1,consumer2` to the command line will only run the pact files for those consumers (consumer1 and consumer2). Adding `-Ppact.filter.description=a request for payment.*` will only run those interactions whose descriptions start with 'a request for payment'. `-Ppact.filter.providerState=.*payment` will match any interaction that has a provider state that ends with payment, and `-Ppact.filter.providerState=` will match any interaction that does not have a provider state. ## Verifying pact files from a pact broker You can setup your build to validate against the pacts stored in a pact broker. The pact gradle plugin will query the pact broker for all consumers that have a pact with the provider based on its name. ### For Pact-JVM 4.1.0 and later #### First: Add a `broker` configuration block You can enable Pact broker support by adding a `broker` configuration block to the `pact` block. For example: ```groovy pact { broker { pactBrokerUrl = 'https://your-broker-url/' // To use basic auth pactBrokerUsername = '<USERNAME>' pactBrokerPassword = '<PASSWORD>' // OR to use a bearer token pactBrokerToken = '<TOKEN>' } } ``` #### Second: Define your service provider ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { myProvider { // Define the name of your provider here fromPactBroker { selectors = latestTags('test') // specify your tags here. You can leave this out to just use the latest pacts } } } } ``` ### For Pact-JVM versions before 4.1.0 You configure your service provider and then use the `hasPactsFrom..` methods. For example: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { // You can get the latest pacts from the broker hasPactsFromPactBroker('http://pact-broker:5000/') // And/or you can get the latest pact with a specific tag hasPactsFromPactBrokerWithTag('http://pact-broker:5000/',"tagname") } } } ``` This will verify all pacts found in the pact broker where the provider name is 'provider1'. If you need to set any values on the consumers from the pact broker, you can add a Closure to configure them. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { hasPactsFromPactBroker('http://pact-broker:5000/') { consumer -> stateChange = { providerState -> /* state change code here */ true } } } } } ``` **NOTE: Currently the pacts are fetched from the broker during the configuration phase of the build. This means that if the broker is not available, you will not be able to run any Gradle tasks.** This should be fixed in a forth coming release. In the mean time, to only load the pacts when running the validate task, you can do something like: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { // Only load the pacts from the broker if the start tasks from the command line include pactVerify if ('pactVerify' in gradle.startParameter.taskNames) { hasPactsFromPactBroker('http://pact-broker:5000/') { consumer -> stateChange = { providerState -> /* state change code here */ true } } } } } } ``` #### Using an authenticated Pact Broker You can add the authentication details for the Pact Broker like so: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { hasPactsFromPactBroker('http://pact-broker:5000/', authentication: ['Basic', pactBrokerUser, pactBrokerPassword]) } } } ``` `pactBrokerUser` and `pactBrokerPassword` can be defined in the gradle properties. Or with a bearer token: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { hasPactsFromPactBroker('http://pact-broker:5000/', authentication: ['Bearer', pactBrokerToken]) } } } ``` Preemptive Authentication can be enabled by setting the `pact.pactbroker.httpclient.usePreemptiveAuthentication` property to `true`. **NOTE:** If you're using [pactflow.io](https://pactflow.io/), follow these instructions for configuring your [bearer token](https://docs.pactflow.io/docs/getting-started/#configuring-your-api-token). ### Allowing just the changed pact specified in a webhook to be verified [4.0.6+] When a consumer publishes a new version of a pact file, the Pact broker can fire off a webhook with the URL of the changed pact file. To allow only the changed pact file to be verified, you can override the URL by using the `pact.filter.consumers` and `pact.filter.pacturl` project properties. For example, running: ```console gradle pactVerify -Ppact.filter.consumers='Foo Web Client' -Ppact.filter.pacturl=https://test.pact.dius.com.au/pacts/provider/Activity%20Service/consumer/Foo%20Web%20Client/version/1.0.1 ``` will only run the verification for Foo Web Client with the given pact file URL. ## Verifying pact files from a S3 bucket **NOTE:** You will need to add the Amazon S3 SDK jar file to your project. Pact files stored in an S3 bucket can be verified by using an S3 URL to the pact file. I.e., ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = 's3://bucketname/path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json' } } } } ``` **NOTE:** you can't use the `url` function with S3 URLs, as the URL and URI classes from the Java SDK don't support URLs with the s3 scheme. # Publishing pact files to a pact broker **NOTE**: There is a pact CLI that can be used to publish pacts. See https://github.com/pact-foundation/pact-ruby-cli. The pact gradle plugin provides a `pactPublish` task that can publish all pact files in a directory to a pact broker. To use it, you need to add a publish configuration to the pact configuration that defines the directory where the pact files are and the URL to the pact broker. If you have configured your broker details in a broker configuration block, the task will use that. Otherwise, configure the broker details on the publish block. For example: ```groovy pact { publish { pactDirectory = '/pact/dir' // defaults to $buildDir/pacts pactBrokerUrl = 'http://pactbroker:1234' } } ``` You can set any tags that the pacts should be published with by setting the `tags` property. A common use of this is setting the tag to the current source control branch. This supports using pact with feature branches. ```groovy pact { publish { pactDirectory = '/pact/dir' // defaults to $buildDir/pacts tags = [project.pactBrokerTag] } } ``` _NOTE:_ The pact broker requires a version for all published pacts. The `pactPublish` task will use the version of the gradle project by default. You can override this with the `consumerVersion` property. Make sure you have set one otherwise the broker will reject the pact files. ## Publishing to an authenticated pact broker To publish to a broker protected by basic auth, include the username/password in the broker configuration For example: ```groovy pact { broker { pactBrokerUrl = 'https://your-broker-url/' // To use basic auth pactBrokerUsername = '<USERNAME>' pactBrokerPassword = '<PASSWORD>' // OR to use a bearer token pactBrokerToken = '<TOKEN>' } } ``` You can add the username and password as properties on the publish block. ```groovy pact { publish { pactBrokerUrl = 'https://mypactbroker.com' pactBrokerUsername = 'username' pactBrokerPassword = 'password' } } ``` or with a bearer token ```groovy pact { publish { pactBrokerUrl = 'https://mypactbroker.com' pactBrokerToken = 'token' } } ``` ## Excluding pacts from being published You can exclude some of the pact files from being published by providing a list of regular expressions that match against the base names of the pact files. For example: ```groovy pact { publish { excludes = [ '.*\\-\\d+$' ] // exclude all pact files that end with a dash followed by a number in the name } } ``` # Verifying a message provider The Gradle plugin has been updated to allow invoking test methods that can return the message contents from a message producer. To use it, set the way to invoke the verification to `ANNOTATED_METHOD`. This will allow the pact verification task to scan for test methods that return the message contents. Add something like the following to your gradle build file: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { messageProvider { verificationType = 'ANNOTATED_METHOD' packagesToScan = ['au.com.example.messageprovider.*'] // This is optional, but leaving it out will result in the entire // test classpath being scanned hasPactWith('messageConsumer') { pactFile = url('url/to/messagepact.json') } } } } ``` Now when the `pactVerify` task is run, will look for methods annotated with `@PactVerifyProvider` in the test classpath that have a matching description to what is in the pact file. ```groovy class ConfirmationKafkaMessageBuilderTest { @PactVerifyProvider('an order confirmation message') String verifyMessageForOrder() { Order order = new Order() order.setId(10000004) order.setExchange('ASX') order.setSecurityCode('CBA') order.setPrice(BigDecimal.TEN) order.setUnits(15) order.setGst(new BigDecimal('15.0')) order.setFees(BigDecimal.TEN) def message = new ConfirmationKafkaMessageBuilder() .withOrder(order) .build() JsonOutput.toJson(message) } } ``` It will then validate that the returned contents matches the contents for the message in the pact file. # Verification Reports The default behaviour is to display the verification being done to the console, and pass or fail the build via the normal Gradle mechanism. Additional reports can be generated from the verification. ## Enabling additional reports The verification reports can be controlled by adding a reports section to the pact configuration in the gradle build file. For example: ```groovy pact { reports { defaultReports() // adds the standard console output markdown // report in markdown format json // report in json format } } ``` Any report files will be written to "build/reports/pact". ## Additional Reports The following report types are available in addition to console output (which is enabled by default): `markdown`, `json`. # Publishing verification results to a Pact Broker For pacts that are loaded from a Pact Broker, the results of running the verification can be published back to the broker against the URL for the pact. You will be able to see the result on the Pact Broker home screen. To turn on the verification publishing, set the project property `pact.verifier.publishResults` to `true`. By default, the Gradle project version will be used as the provider version. You can override this by setting the `providerVersion` property. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { providerVersion = { branchName() + '-' + abbreviatedId() } hasPactsFromPactBroker('http://pact-broker:5000/', authentication: ['Basic', pactBrokerUser, pactBrokerPassword]) } } } ``` ## Tagging the provider before verification results are published [4.0.1+] You can have a tag pushed against the provider version before the verification results are published. There are two ways to do this with the Gradle plugin. You can provide a closure in a similar way to the provider version, i.e. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { providerVersion = { branchName() + '-' + abbreviatedId() } providerTags = { [ branchName() ] } hasPactsFromPactBroker('http://pact-broker:5000/', authentication: ['Basic', pactBrokerUser, pactBrokerPassword]) } } } ``` or you can set the `pact.provider.tag` JVM system property. For example: ```console $ ./gradlew -d pactverify -Ppact.verifier.publishResults=true -Dpact.provider.tag=Test2 ``` From 4.1.8+, you can specify multiple tags with an array for the `providerTag` value, or a comma separated string for the `pact.provider.tag` system property. # Pending Pact Support (version 4.1.0 and later) If your Pact broker supports pending pacts, you can enable support for that by enabling that on your Pact broker annotation or with JVM system properties. You also need to provide the tags that will be published with your provider's verification results. The broker will then label any pacts found that don't have a successful verification result as pending. That way, if they fail verification, the verifier will ignore those failures and not fail the build. For example: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { myProvider { fromPactBroker { selectors = latestTags('test') // specify your tags here. You can leave this out to just use the latest pacts enablePending = true // enable pending pacts support providerTags = ['master'] // specify the provider main-line tags } } } } ``` Then any pending pacts will not cause a build failure.

Group: au.com.dius.pact.provider Artifact: gradle
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Artifact gradle
Group au.com.dius.pact.provider
Version 4.2.0-beta.0
Last update 18. October 2020
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URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
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