All Downloads are FREE. Search and download functionalities are using the official Maven repository.

Download JAR files tagged by forcing with all dependencies

Search JAR files by class name

forcedInit from group ch.awae (version 0.0.1)

Library for forcing initialisation of specially marked classes

Group: ch.awae Artifact: forcedInit
Show documentation Show source 
 

0 downloads
Artifact forcedInit
Group ch.awae
Version 0.0.1
Last update 29. September 2016
Organization not specified
URL http://www.awae.ch
License MIT License
Dependencies amount 1
Dependencies reflections,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

sfmf4j from group com.github.sworisbreathing (version 1.0)

SFMF4J is a simple file monitoring facade for Java. It attempts to do for file monitoring what SLF4J does for logging, which is to abstract away the API from the interface, such that library developers can write code against a file monitoring solution without forcing an application developer to use any particular file monitoring implementation.

Group: com.github.sworisbreathing Artifact: sfmf4j
There is no JAR file uploaded. A download is not possible! Please choose another version.
0 downloads
Artifact sfmf4j
Group com.github.sworisbreathing
Version 1.0
Last update 06. March 2013
Organization Steven Swor
URL http://sworisbreathing.github.com/sfmf4j
License The Apache Software License, Version 2.0
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

listenablefuture from group com.google.guava (version 9999.0-empty-to-avoid-conflict-with-guava)

An empty artifact that Guava depends on to signal that it is providing ListenableFuture -- but is also available in a second "version" that contains com.google.common.util.concurrent.ListenableFuture class, without any other Guava classes. The idea is: - If users want only ListenableFuture, they depend on listenablefuture-1.0. - If users want all of Guava, they depend on guava, which, as of Guava 27.0, depends on listenablefuture-9999.0-empty-to-avoid-conflict-with-guava. The 9999.0-... version number is enough for some build systems (notably, Gradle) to select that empty artifact over the "real" listenablefuture-1.0 -- avoiding a conflict with the copy of ListenableFuture in guava itself. If users are using an older version of Guava or a build system other than Gradle, they may see class conflicts. If so, they can solve them by manually excluding the listenablefuture artifact or manually forcing their build systems to use 9999.0-....

Group: com.google.guava Artifact: listenablefuture
Show all versions 
 

48 downloads
Artifact listenablefuture
Group com.google.guava
Version 9999.0-empty-to-avoid-conflict-with-guava
Last update 11. September 2018
Organization not specified
URL Not specified
License not specified
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

weblab-client from group org.ow2.weblab.components (version 0.1)

This library aims to provide a central access point to the services exposed on the ESB without forcing each part of the system to know the actual location of the ESB and the names of the exposed endpoints. For this sake it allows to map service URI (ie referring to service in webLab taxonomy) to the actual exposed URL on the ESB within the context of a specific project. The library and the configuration should be added in portal lib in order to be central and available to any portlets. The mapping is done in a simple spring config file "webLabClient.xml" which must be accessible in JAVA classpath.

Group: org.ow2.weblab.components Artifact: weblab-client
Show documentation Show source 
 

0 downloads
Artifact weblab-client
Group org.ow2.weblab.components
Version 0.1
Last update 11. July 2012
Organization not specified
URL Not specified
License not specified
Dependencies amount 1
Dependencies spring-beans,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-consumer-specs2_2.12 from group au.com.dius (version 4.0.10)

pact-jvm-consumer-specs2 ======================== ## Specs2 Bindings for the pact-jvm library ## Dependency In the root folder of your project in build.sbt add the line: ```scala libraryDependencies += "au.com.dius" %% "pact-jvm-consumer-specs2" % "3.2.11" ``` or if you are using Gradle: ```groovy dependencies { testCompile "au.com.dius:pact-jvm-consumer-specs2_2.11:3.2.11" } ``` __*Note:*__ `PactSpec` requires spec2 3.x. Also, for spray users there's an incompatibility between specs2 v3.x and spray. Follow these instructions to resolve that problem: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/spray-user/2T6SBp4OJeI/AJlnJuAKPRsJ ## Usage To author a test, mix `PactSpec` into your spec First we define a service client called `ConsumerService`. In our example this is a simple wrapper for `dispatch`, an HTTP client. The source code can be found in the test folder alongside the `ExamplePactSpec`. Here is a simple example: ``` import au.com.dius.pact.consumer.PactSpec class ExamplePactSpec extends Specification with PactSpec { val consumer = "My Consumer" val provider = "My Provider" override def is = uponReceiving("a request for foo") .matching(path = "/foo") .willRespondWith(body = "{}") .withConsumerTest { providerConfig => Await.result(ConsumerService(providerConfig.url).simpleGet("/foo"), Duration(1000, MILLISECONDS)) must beEqualTo(200, Some("{}")) } } ``` This spec will be run along with the rest of your specs2 unit tests and will output your pact json to ``` /target/pacts/<Consumer>_<Provider>.json ``` # Forcing pact files to be overwritten (3.6.5+) By default, when the pact file is written, it will be merged with any existing pact file. To force the file to be overwritten, set the Java system property `pact.writer.overwrite` to `true`.

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-consumer-specs2_2.12
Show all versions Show documentation Show source 
 

0 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-consumer-specs2_2.12
Group au.com.dius
Version 4.0.10
Last update 18. April 2020
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 5
Dependencies pact-jvm-consumer, json, specs2-core_2.12, async-http-client, scala-java8-compat_2.12,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

specs2_2.13 from group au.com.dius.pact.consumer (version 4.2.21)

pact-jvm-consumer-specs2 ======================== ## Specs2 Bindings for the pact-jvm library ## Dependency In the root folder of your project in build.sbt add the line: ```scala libraryDependencies += "au.com.dius.pact.consumer" %% "specs2" % "4.0.1" ``` or if you are using Gradle: ```groovy dependencies { testCompile "au.com.dius.pact.consumer:specs2_2.13:4.0.1" } ``` __*Note:*__ `PactSpec` requires spec2 3.x. Also, for spray users there's an incompatibility between specs2 v3.x and spray. Follow these instructions to resolve that problem: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/spray-user/2T6SBp4OJeI/AJlnJuAKPRsJ ## Usage To author a test, mix `PactSpec` into your spec First we define a service client called `ConsumerService`. In our example this is a simple wrapper for `dispatch`, an HTTP client. The source code can be found in the test folder alongside the `ExamplePactSpec`. Here is a simple example: ``` import au.com.dius.pact.consumer.PactSpec class ExamplePactSpec extends Specification with PactSpec { val consumer = "My Consumer" val provider = "My Provider" override def is = uponReceiving("a request for foo") .matching(path = "/foo") .willRespondWith(body = "{}") .withConsumerTest { providerConfig => Await.result(ConsumerService(providerConfig.url).simpleGet("/foo"), Duration(1000, MILLISECONDS)) must beEqualTo(200, Some("{}")) } } ``` This spec will be run along with the rest of your specs2 unit tests and will output your pact json to ``` /target/pacts/<Consumer>_<Provider>.json ``` # Forcing pact files to be overwritten (3.6.5+) By default, when the pact file is written, it will be merged with any existing pact file. To force the file to be overwritten, set the Java system property `pact.writer.overwrite` to `true`. # Test Analytics We are tracking anonymous analytics to gather important usage statistics like JVM version and operating system. To disable tracking, set the 'pact_do_not_track' system property or environment variable to 'true'.

Group: au.com.dius.pact.consumer Artifact: specs2_2.13
Show all versions Show documentation Show source 
 

0 downloads
Artifact specs2_2.13
Group au.com.dius.pact.consumer
Version 4.2.21
Last update 13. May 2022
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 5
Dependencies consumer, json, specs2-core_2.13, async-http-client, scala-java8-compat_2.13,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.12 from group au.com.dius (version 3.6.15)

pact-jvm-consumer-junit5 ======================== JUnit 5 support for Pact consumer tests ## Dependency The library is available on maven central using: * group-id = `au.com.dius` * artifact-id = `pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.12` * version-id = `3.6.x` ## Usage ### 1. Add the Pact consumer test extension to the test class. To write Pact consumer tests with JUnit 5, you need to add `@ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt)` to your test class. This replaces the `PactRunner` used for JUnit 4 tests. The rest of the test follows a similar pattern as for JUnit 4 tests. ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` ### 2. create a method annotated with `@Pact` that returns the interactions for the test For each test (as with JUnit 4), you need to define a method annotated with the `@Pact` annotation that returns the interactions for the test. ```java @Pact(provider="ArticlesProvider", consumer="test_consumer") public RequestResponsePact createPact(PactDslWithProvider builder) { return builder .given("test state") .uponReceiving("ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest test interaction") .path("/articles.json") .method("GET") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"responsetest\": true}") .toPact(); } ``` ### 3. Link the mock server with the interactions for the test with `@PactTestFor` Then the final step is to use the `@PactTestFor` annotation to tell the Pact extension how to setup the Pact test. You can either put this annotation on the test class, or on the test method. For examples see [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) and [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy). The `@PactTestFor` annotation allows you to control the mock server in the same way as the JUnit 4 `PactProviderRule`. It allows you to set the hostname to bind to (default is `localhost`) and the port (default is to use a random port). You can also set the Pact specification version to use (default is V3). ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) @PactTestFor(providerName = "ArticlesProvider") public class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` **NOTE on the hostname**: The mock server runs in the same JVM as the test, so the only valid values for hostname are: | hostname | result | | -------- | ------ | | `localhost` | binds to the address that localhost points to (normally the loopback adapter) | | `127.0.0.1` or `::1` | binds to the loopback adapter | | host name | binds to the default interface that the host machines DNS name resolves to | | `0.0.0.0` or `::` | binds to the all interfaces on the host machine | #### Matching the interactions by provider name If you set the `providerName` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the first method with a `@Pact` annotation with the same provider name will be used. See [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) for an example. #### Matching the interactions by method name If you set the `pactMethod` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the method with the provided name will be used (it still needs a `@Pact` annotation). See [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy) for an example. ### Injecting the mock server into the test You can get the mock server injected into the test method by adding a `MockServer` parameter to the test method. ```java @Test void test(MockServer mockServer) throws IOException { HttpResponse httpResponse = Request.Get(mockServer.getUrl() + "/articles.json").execute().returnResponse(); assertThat(httpResponse.getStatusLine().getStatusCode(), is(equalTo(200))); } ``` This helps with getting the base URL of the mock server, especially when a random port is used. ## Changing the directory pact files are written to By default, pact files are written to `target/pacts` (or `build/pacts` if you use Gradle), but this can be overwritten with the `pact.rootDir` system property. This property needs to be set on the test JVM as most build tools will fork a new JVM to run the tests. For Gradle, add this to your build.gradle: ```groovy test { systemProperties['pact.rootDir'] = "$buildDir/custom-pacts-directory" } ``` For maven, use the systemPropertyVariables configuration: ```xml <project> [...] <build> <plugins> <plugin> <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId> <version>2.18</version> <configuration> <systemPropertyVariables> <pact.rootDir>some/other/directory</pact.rootDir> <buildDirectory>${project.build.directory}</buildDirectory> [...] </systemPropertyVariables> </configuration> </plugin> </plugins> </build> [...] </project> ``` For SBT: ```scala fork in Test := true, javaOptions in Test := Seq("-Dpact.rootDir=some/other/directory") ``` ### Using `@PactFolder` annotation [3.6.2+] You can override the directory the pacts are written in a test by adding the `@PactFolder` annotation to the test class. ## Forcing pact files to be overwritten (3.6.5+) By default, when the pact file is written, it will be merged with any existing pact file. To force the file to be overwritten, set the Java system property `pact.writer.overwrite` to `true`. ## Unsupported The current implementation does not support tests with multiple providers. This will be added in a later release. # Having values injected from provider state callbacks (3.6.11+) You can have values from the provider state callbacks be injected into most places (paths, query parameters, headers, bodies, etc.). This works by using the V3 spec generators with provider state callbacks that return values. One example of where this would be useful is API calls that require an ID which would be auto-generated by the database on the provider side, so there is no way to know what the ID would be beforehand. The following DSL methods all you to set an expression that will be parsed with the values returned from the provider states: For JSON bodies, use `valueFromProviderState`.<br/> For headers, use `headerFromProviderState`.<br/> For query parameters, use `queryParameterFromProviderState`.<br/> For paths, use `pathFromProviderState`. For example, assume that an API call is made to get the details of a user by ID. A provider state can be defined that specifies that the user must be exist, but the ID will be created when the user is created. So we can then define an expression for the path where the ID will be replaced with the value returned from the provider state callback. ```java .pathFromProviderState("/api/users/${id}", "/api/users/100") ``` You can also just use the key instead of an expression: ```java .valueFromProviderState('userId', 'userId', 100) // will look value using userId as the key ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.12
Show all versions Show documentation Show source 
 

3 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.12
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.6.15
Last update 29. April 2020
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 2
Dependencies pact-jvm-consumer_2.12, junit-jupiter-api,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-consumer-junit5 from group au.com.dius (version 4.0.10)

pact-jvm-consumer-junit5 ======================== JUnit 5 support for Pact consumer tests ## Dependency The library is available on maven central using: * group-id = `au.com.dius` * artifact-id = `pact-jvm-consumer-junit5` * version-id = `4.0.x` ## Usage ### 1. Add the Pact consumer test extension to the test class. To write Pact consumer tests with JUnit 5, you need to add `@ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt)` to your test class. This replaces the `PactRunner` used for JUnit 4 tests. The rest of the test follows a similar pattern as for JUnit 4 tests. ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` ### 2. create a method annotated with `@Pact` that returns the interactions for the test For each test (as with JUnit 4), you need to define a method annotated with the `@Pact` annotation that returns the interactions for the test. ```java @Pact(provider="ArticlesProvider", consumer="test_consumer") public RequestResponsePact createPact(PactDslWithProvider builder) { return builder .given("test state") .uponReceiving("ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest test interaction") .path("/articles.json") .method("GET") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"responsetest\": true}") .toPact(); } ``` ### 3. Link the mock server with the interactions for the test with `@PactTestFor` Then the final step is to use the `@PactTestFor` annotation to tell the Pact extension how to setup the Pact test. You can either put this annotation on the test class, or on the test method. For examples see [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) and [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy). The `@PactTestFor` annotation allows you to control the mock server in the same way as the JUnit 4 `PactProviderRule`. It allows you to set the hostname to bind to (default is `localhost`) and the port (default is to use a random port). You can also set the Pact specification version to use (default is V3). ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) @PactTestFor(providerName = "ArticlesProvider") public class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` **NOTE on the hostname**: The mock server runs in the same JVM as the test, so the only valid values for hostname are: | hostname | result | | -------- | ------ | | `localhost` | binds to the address that localhost points to (normally the loopback adapter) | | `127.0.0.1` or `::1` | binds to the loopback adapter | | host name | binds to the default interface that the host machines DNS name resolves to | | `0.0.0.0` or `::` | binds to the all interfaces on the host machine | #### Matching the interactions by provider name If you set the `providerName` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the first method with a `@Pact` annotation with the same provider name will be used. See [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) for an example. #### Matching the interactions by method name If you set the `pactMethod` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the method with the provided name will be used (it still needs a `@Pact` annotation). See [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy) for an example. ### Injecting the mock server into the test You can get the mock server injected into the test method by adding a `MockServer` parameter to the test method. ```java @Test void test(MockServer mockServer) throws IOException { HttpResponse httpResponse = Request.Get(mockServer.getUrl() + "/articles.json").execute().returnResponse(); assertThat(httpResponse.getStatusLine().getStatusCode(), is(equalTo(200))); } ``` This helps with getting the base URL of the mock server, especially when a random port is used. ## Changing the directory pact files are written to By default, pact files are written to `target/pacts` (or `build/pacts` if you use Gradle), but this can be overwritten with the `pact.rootDir` system property. This property needs to be set on the test JVM as most build tools will fork a new JVM to run the tests. For Gradle, add this to your build.gradle: ```groovy test { systemProperties['pact.rootDir'] = "$buildDir/custom-pacts-directory" } ``` For maven, use the systemPropertyVariables configuration: ```xml <project> [...] <build> <plugins> <plugin> <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId> <version>2.18</version> <configuration> <systemPropertyVariables> <pact.rootDir>some/other/directory</pact.rootDir> <buildDirectory>${project.build.directory}</buildDirectory> [...] </systemPropertyVariables> </configuration> </plugin> </plugins> </build> [...] </project> ``` For SBT: ```scala fork in Test := true, javaOptions in Test := Seq("-Dpact.rootDir=some/other/directory") ``` ### Using `@PactFolder` annotation You can override the directory the pacts are written in a test by adding the `@PactFolder` annotation to the test class. ## Forcing pact files to be overwritten (3.6.5+) By default, when the pact file is written, it will be merged with any existing pact file. To force the file to be overwritten, set the Java system property `pact.writer.overwrite` to `true`. ## Unsupported The current implementation does not support tests with multiple providers. This will be added in a later release. # Having values injected from provider state callbacks (3.6.11+) You can have values from the provider state callbacks be injected into most places (paths, query parameters, headers, bodies, etc.). This works by using the V3 spec generators with provider state callbacks that return values. One example of where this would be useful is API calls that require an ID which would be auto-generated by the database on the provider side, so there is no way to know what the ID would be beforehand. The following DSL methods all you to set an expression that will be parsed with the values returned from the provider states: For JSON bodies, use `valueFromProviderState`.<br/> For headers, use `headerFromProviderState`.<br/> For query parameters, use `queryParameterFromProviderState`.<br/> For paths, use `pathFromProviderState`. For example, assume that an API call is made to get the details of a user by ID. A provider state can be defined that specifies that the user must be exist, but the ID will be created when the user is created. So we can then define an expression for the path where the ID will be replaced with the value returned from the provider state callback. ```java .pathFromProviderState("/api/users/${id}", "/api/users/100") ``` You can also just use the key instead of an expression: ```java .valueFromProviderState('userId', 'userId', 100) // will look value using userId as the key ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-consumer-junit5
Show all versions Show documentation Show source 
 

0 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-consumer-junit5
Group au.com.dius
Version 4.0.10
Last update 18. April 2020
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 2
Dependencies junit-jupiter-api, pact-jvm-consumer,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

junit5 from group au.com.dius.pact.consumer (version 4.4.0-beta.2)

pact-jvm-consumer-junit5 ======================== JUnit 5 support for Pact consumer tests ## Dependency The library is available on maven central using: * group-id = `au.com.dius.pact.consumer` * artifact-id = `junit5` * version-id = `4.2.X` ## Usage ### 1. Add the Pact consumer test extension to the test class. To write Pact consumer tests with JUnit 5, you need to add `@ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt)` to your test class. This replaces the `PactRunner` used for JUnit 4 tests. The rest of the test follows a similar pattern as for JUnit 4 tests. ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` ### 2. create a method annotated with `@Pact` that returns the interactions for the test For each test (as with JUnit 4), you need to define a method annotated with the `@Pact` annotation that returns the interactions for the test. ```java @Pact(provider="ArticlesProvider", consumer="test_consumer") public RequestResponsePact createPact(PactDslWithProvider builder) { return builder .given("test state") .uponReceiving("ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest test interaction") .path("/articles.json") .method("GET") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"responsetest\": true}") .toPact(); } ``` ### 3. Link the mock server with the interactions for the test with `@PactTestFor` Then the final step is to use the `@PactTestFor` annotation to tell the Pact extension how to setup the Pact test. You can either put this annotation on the test class, or on the test method. For examples see [ArticlesTest](https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm/blob/master/consumer/junit5/src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) and [MultiTest](https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm/blob/master/consumer/junit5/src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy). The `@PactTestFor` annotation allows you to control the mock server in the same way as the JUnit 4 `PactProviderRule`. It allows you to set the hostname to bind to (default is `localhost`) and the port (default is to use a random port). You can also set the Pact specification version to use (default is V3). ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) @PactTestFor(providerName = "ArticlesProvider") public class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` **NOTE on the hostname**: The mock server runs in the same JVM as the test, so the only valid values for hostname are: | hostname | result | | -------- | ------ | | `localhost` | binds to the address that localhost points to (normally the loopback adapter) | | `127.0.0.1` or `::1` | binds to the loopback adapter | | host name | binds to the default interface that the host machines DNS name resolves to | | `0.0.0.0` or `::` | binds to the all interfaces on the host machine | #### Matching the interactions by provider name If you set the `providerName` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the first method with a `@Pact` annotation with the same provider name will be used. See [ArticlesTest](https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm/blob/master/consumer/junit5/src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) for an example. #### Matching the interactions by method name If you set the `pactMethod` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the method with the provided name will be used (it still needs a `@Pact` annotation). See [MultiTest](https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm/blob/master/consumer/junit5/src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy) for an example. ### Injecting the mock server into the test You can get the mock server injected into the test method by adding a `MockServer` parameter to the test method. ```java @Test void test(MockServer mockServer) throws IOException { HttpResponse httpResponse = Request.Get(mockServer.getUrl() + "/articles.json").execute().returnResponse(); assertThat(httpResponse.getStatusLine().getStatusCode(), is(equalTo(200))); } ``` This helps with getting the base URL of the mock server, especially when a random port is used. ## Changing the directory pact files are written to By default, pact files are written to `target/pacts` (or `build/pacts` if you use Gradle), but this can be overwritten with the `pact.rootDir` system property. This property needs to be set on the test JVM as most build tools will fork a new JVM to run the tests. For Gradle, add this to your build.gradle: ```groovy test { systemProperties['pact.rootDir'] = "$buildDir/custom-pacts-directory" } ``` For maven, use the systemPropertyVariables configuration: ```xml <project> [...] <build> <plugins> <plugin> <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId> <version>2.18</version> <configuration> <systemPropertyVariables> <pact.rootDir>some/other/directory</pact.rootDir> <buildDirectory>${project.build.directory}</buildDirectory> [...] </systemPropertyVariables> </configuration> </plugin> </plugins> </build> [...] </project> ``` For SBT: ```scala fork in Test := true, javaOptions in Test := Seq("-Dpact.rootDir=some/other/directory") ``` ### Using `@PactDirectory` annotation You can override the directory the pacts are written in a test by adding the `@PactDirectory` annotation to the test class. ## Forcing pact files to be overwritten By default, when the pact file is written, it will be merged with any existing pact file. To force the file to be overwritten, set the Java system property `pact.writer.overwrite` to `true`. # Having values injected from provider state callbacks You can have values from the provider state callbacks be injected into most places (paths, query parameters, headers, bodies, etc.). This works by using the V3 spec generators with provider state callbacks that return values. One example of where this would be useful is API calls that require an ID which would be auto-generated by the database on the provider side, so there is no way to know what the ID would be beforehand. The following DSL methods all you to set an expression that will be parsed with the values returned from the provider states: For JSON bodies, use `valueFromProviderState`.<br/> For headers, use `headerFromProviderState`.<br/> For query parameters, use `queryParameterFromProviderState`.<br/> For paths, use `pathFromProviderState`. For example, assume that an API call is made to get the details of a user by ID. A provider state can be defined that specifies that the user must be exist, but the ID will be created when the user is created. So we can then define an expression for the path where the ID will be replaced with the value returned from the provider state callback. ```java .pathFromProviderState("/api/users/${id}", "/api/users/100") ``` You can also just use the key instead of an expression: ```java .valueFromProviderState('userId', 'userId', 100) // will look value using userId as the key ``` ## Overriding the expression markers `${` and `}` (4.1.25+) You can change the markers of the expressions using the following system properties: - `pact.expressions.start` (default is `${`) - `pact.expressions.end` (default is `}`) ## Using HTTPS You can enable a HTTPS mock server by setting `https=true` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation. Note that this mock server will use a self-signed certificate, so any client code will need to accept self-signed certificates. ## Using own KeyStore You can provide your own KeyStore file to be loaded on the MockServer. In order to do so you should fulfill the properties `keyStorePath`, `keyStoreAlias`, `keyStorePassword`, `privateKeyPassword` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation. Please bear in mind you should also enable HTTPS flag. ## Using multiple providers in a test (4.2.5+) It is advisable to focus on a single interaction with each test, but you can enable multiple providers in a single test. In this case, a separate mock server will be started for each configured provider. To enable this: 1. Create a method to create the Pact for each provider annotated with the `@Pact(provider = "....")` annotation. The provider name must be set on the annotation. You can create as many of these as required, but each must have a unique provider name. 2. In the test method, use the `pactMethods` attribute on the `@PactTestFor` annotation with the names of all the methods defined in step 1. 3. Add a MockServer parameter to the test method for each provider configured in step 1 with a `@ForProvider` annotation with the name of the provider. 4. In your test method, interact with each of the mock servers passed in step 3. Note that if any mock server does not get the requests it expects, it will fail the test. For an example, see [MultiProviderTest](https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm/blob/master/consumer/junit5/src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiProviderTest.groovy). ## Dealing with persistent HTTP/1.1 connections (Keep Alive) As each test will get a new mock server, connections can not be persisted between tests. HTTP clients can cache connections with HTTP/1.1, and this can cause subsequent tests to fail. See [#342](https://github.com/pact-foundation/pact-jvm/issues/342) and [#1383](https://github.com/pact-foundation/pact-jvm/issues/1383). One option (if the HTTP client supports it, Apache HTTP Client does) is to set the system property `http.keepAlive` to `false` in the test JVM. The other option is to set `pact.mockserver.addCloseHeader` to `true` to force the mock server to send a `Connection: close` header with every response (supported with Pact-JVM 4.2.7+). # Testing messages You can use Pact to test interactions with messaging systems. There are two main types of message support: asynchronous messages and synchronous request/response messages. ## Asynchronous messages Asynchronous messages are you normal type of single shot or fire and forget type messages. They are typically sent to a message queue or topic as a notification or event. With Pact tests, we will be testing that our consumer of the messages works with the messages setup as the expectations in test. This should be the message handler code that processes the actual messages that come off the message queue in production. You can use either the V3 Message Pact or the V4 Asynchronous Message interaction to test these types of interactions. For a V3 message pact example, see [AsyncMessageTest](https://github.com/pact-foundation/pact-jvm/blob/ac6a0eae0b18183f6f453eafddb89b90741ace42/consumer/junit5/src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/AsyncMessageTest.java). For a V4 asynchronous message example, see [V4AsyncMessageTest](https://github.com/pact-foundation/pact-jvm/blob/master/consumer/junit5/src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/V4AsyncMessageTest.groovy). ### Matching message metadata You can also use matching rules for the metadata associated with the message. There is a `MetadataBuilder` class to help with this. You can access it via the `withMetadata` method that takes a Java Consumer on the `MessagePactBuilder` class. For example: ```java builder.given("SomeProviderState") .expectsToReceive("a test message with metadata") .withMetadata(md -> { md.add("metadata1", "metadataValue1"); md.add("metadata2", "metadataValue2"); md.add("metadata3", 10L); md.matchRegex("partitionKey", "[A-Z]{3}\\d{2}", "ABC01"); }) .withContent(body) .toPact(); ``` ### V4 Synchronous request/response messages Synchronous request/response messages are a form of message interchange were a request message is sent to another service and one or more response messages are returned. Examples of this would be things like Websockets and gRPC. For a V4 synchronous request/response message example, see [V4AsyncMessageTest](https://github.com/pact-foundation/pact-jvm/blob/master/consumer/junit5/src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/V4SyncMessageTest.groovy). # Using Pact plugins (version 4.3.0+) The `PactBuilder` consumer test builder supports using Pact plugins. Plugins are defined in the [Pact plugins project](https://github.com/pact-foundation/pact-plugins). To use plugins requires the use of Pact specification V4 Pacts. To use a plugin, first you need to let the builder know to load the plugin (using the `usingPlugin` method) and then configure the interaction based on the requirements for the plugin. Each plugin may have different requirements, so you will have to consult the plugin docs on what is required. The plugins will be loaded from the plugin directory. By default, this is `~/.pact/plugins` or the value of the `PACT_PLUGIN_DIR` environment variable. Then you need to use the `with` method that takes a Map-based data structure and passed it on to the plugin to setup the interaction. For example, if we use the CSV plugin from the plugins project, our test would look like: ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) class CsvClientTest { /** * Setup an interaction that makes a request for a CSV report */ @Pact(consumer = "CsvClient") V4Pact pact(PactBuilder builder) { return builder // Tell the builder to load the CSV plugin .usingPlugin("csv") // Interaction we are expecting to receive .expectsToReceive("request for a report", "core/interaction/http") // Data for the interaction. This will be sent to the plugin .with(Map.of( "request.path", "/reports/report001.csv", "response.status", "200", "response.contents", Map.of( "pact:content-type", "text/csv", "csvHeaders", false, "column:1", "matching(type,'Name')", "column:2", "matching(number,100)", "column:3", "matching(datetime, 'yyyy-MM-dd','2000-01-01')" ) )) .toPact(); } /** * Test to get the CSV report */ @Test @PactTestFor(providerName = "CsvServer", pactMethod = "pact") void getCsvReport(MockServer mockServer) throws IOException { // Setup our CSV client class to point to the Pact mock server CsvClient client = new CsvClient(mockServer.getUrl()); // Fetch the CSV report List<CSVRecord> csvData = client.fetch("report001.csv", false); // Verify it is as expected assertThat(csvData.size(), is(1)); assertThat(csvData.get(0).get(0), is(equalTo("Name"))); assertThat(csvData.get(0).get(1), is(equalTo("100"))); assertThat(csvData.get(0).get(2), matchesRegex("\\d{4}-\\d{2}-\\d{2}")); } } ``` # Test Analytics We are tracking anonymous analytics to gather important usage statistics like JVM version and operating system. To disable tracking, set the 'pact_do_not_track' system property or environment variable to 'true'.

Group: au.com.dius.pact.consumer Artifact: junit5
Show all versions Show documentation Show source 
 

0 downloads
Artifact junit5
Group au.com.dius.pact.consumer
Version 4.4.0-beta.2
Last update 27. April 2022
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 1
Dependencies consumer,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-consumer_2.12 from group au.com.dius (version 3.6.15)

Pact consumer ============= Pact Consumer is used by projects that are consumers of an API. Most projects will want to use pact-consumer via one of the test framework specific projects. If your favourite framework is not implemented, this module should give you all the hooks you need. Provides a DSL for use with Java to build consumer pacts. ## Dependency The library is available on maven central using: * group-id = `au.com.dius` * artifact-id = `pact-jvm-consumer_2.11` ## DSL Usage Example in a JUnit test: ```java import au.com.dius.pact.model.MockProviderConfig; import au.com.dius.pact.model.RequestResponsePact; import org.apache.http.entity.ContentType; import org.jetbrains.annotations.NotNull; import org.junit.Test; import java.io.IOException; import java.util.HashMap; import java.util.Map; import static au.com.dius.pact.consumer.ConsumerPactRunnerKt.runConsumerTest; import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals; public class PactTest { @Test public void testPact() { RequestResponsePact pact = ConsumerPactBuilder .consumer("Some Consumer") .hasPactWith("Some Provider") .uponReceiving("a request to say Hello") .path("/hello") .method("POST") .body("{\"name\": \"harry\"}") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"hello\": \"harry\"}") .toPact(); MockProviderConfig config = MockProviderConfig.createDefault(); PactVerificationResult result = runConsumerTest(pact, config, new PactTestRun() { @Override public void run(@NotNull MockServer mockServer) throws IOException { Map expectedResponse = new HashMap(); expectedResponse.put("hello", "harry"); assertEquals(expectedResponse, new ConsumerClient(mockServer.getUrl()).post("/hello", "{\"name\": \"harry\"}", ContentType.APPLICATION_JSON)); } }); if (result instanceof PactVerificationResult.Error) { throw new RuntimeException(((PactVerificationResult.Error)result).getError()); } assertEquals(PactVerificationResult.Ok.INSTANCE, result); } } ``` The DSL has the following pattern: ```java .consumer("Some Consumer") .hasPactWith("Some Provider") .given("a certain state on the provider") .uponReceiving("a request for something") .path("/hello") .method("POST") .body("{\"name\": \"harry\"}") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"hello\": \"harry\"}") .uponReceiving("another request for something") .path("/hello") .method("POST") .body("{\"name\": \"harry\"}") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"hello\": \"harry\"}") . . . .toPact() ``` You can define as many interactions as required. Each interaction starts with `uponReceiving` followed by `willRespondWith`. The test state setup with `given` is a mechanism to describe what the state of the provider should be in before the provider is verified. It is only recorded in the consumer tests and used by the provider verification tasks. ### Building JSON bodies with PactDslJsonBody DSL The body method of the ConsumerPactBuilder can accept a PactDslJsonBody, which can construct a JSON body as well as define regex and type matchers. For example: ```java PactDslJsonBody body = new PactDslJsonBody() .stringType("name") .booleanType("happy") .hexValue("hexCode") .id() .ipAddress("localAddress") .numberValue("age", 100) .timestamp(); ``` #### DSL Matching methods The following matching methods are provided with the DSL. In most cases, they take an optional value parameter which will be used to generate example values (i.e. when returning a mock response). If no example value is given, a random one will be generated. | method | description | |--------|-------------| | string, stringValue | Match a string value (using string equality) | | number, numberValue | Match a number value (using Number.equals)\* | | booleanValue | Match a boolean value (using equality) | | stringType | Will match all Strings | | numberType | Will match all numbers\* | | integerType | Will match all numbers that are integers (both ints and longs)\* | | decimalType | Will match all real numbers (floating point and decimal)\* | | booleanType | Will match all boolean values (true and false) | | stringMatcher | Will match strings using the provided regular expression | | timestamp | Will match string containing timestamps. If a timestamp format is not given, will match an ISO timestamp format | | date | Will match string containing dates. If a date format is not given, will match an ISO date format | | time | Will match string containing times. If a time format is not given, will match an ISO time format | | ipAddress | Will match string containing IP4 formatted address. | | id | Will match all numbers by type | | hexValue | Will match all hexadecimal encoded strings | | uuid | Will match strings containing UUIDs | | includesStr | Will match strings containing the provided string | | equalsTo | Will match using equals | | matchUrl | Defines a matcher for URLs, given the base URL path and a sequence of path fragments. The path fragments could be strings or regular expression matchers | _\* Note:_ JSON only supports double precision floating point values. Depending on the language implementation, they may parsed as integer, floating point or decimal numbers. #### Ensuring all items in a list match an example (2.2.0+) Lots of the time you might not know the number of items that will be in a list, but you want to ensure that the list has a minimum or maximum size and that each item in the list matches a given example. You can do this with the `arrayLike`, `minArrayLike` and `maxArrayLike` functions. | function | description | |----------|-------------| | `eachLike` | Ensure that each item in the list matches the provided example | | `maxArrayLike` | Ensure that each item in the list matches the provided example and the list is no bigger than the provided max | | `minArrayLike` | Ensure that each item in the list matches the provided example and the list is no smaller than the provided min | For example: ```java DslPart body = new PactDslJsonBody() .minArrayLike("users") .id() .stringType("name") .closeObject() .closeArray(); ``` This will ensure that the users list is never empty and that each user has an identifier that is a number and a name that is a string. #### Matching JSON values at the root (Version 3.2.2/2.4.3+) For cases where you are expecting basic JSON values (strings, numbers, booleans and null) at the root level of the body and need to use matchers, you can use the `PactDslJsonRootValue` class. It has all the DSL matching methods for basic values that you can use. For example: ```java .consumer("Some Consumer") .hasPactWith("Some Provider") .uponReceiving("a request for a basic JSON value") .path("/hello") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body(PactDslJsonRootValue.integerType()) ``` #### Root level arrays that match all items (version 2.2.11+) If the root of the body is an array, you can create PactDslJsonArray classes with the following methods: | function | description | |----------|-------------| | `arrayEachLike` | Ensure that each item in the list matches the provided example | | `arrayMinLike` | Ensure that each item in the list matches the provided example and the list is no bigger than the provided max | | `arrayMaxLike` | Ensure that each item in the list matches the provided example and the list is no smaller than the provided min | For example: ```java PactDslJsonArray.arrayEachLike() .date("clearedDate", "mm/dd/yyyy", date) .stringType("status", "STATUS") .decimalType("amount", 100.0) .closeObject() ``` This will then match a body like: ```json [ { "clearedDate" : "07/22/2015", "status" : "C", "amount" : 15.0 }, { "clearedDate" : "07/22/2015", "status" : "C", "amount" : 15.0 }, { "clearedDate" : "07/22/2015", "status" : "C", "amount" : 15.0 } ] ``` #### Matching arrays of arrays (version 3.2.12/2.4.14+) For the case where you have arrays of arrays (GeoJSON is an example), the following methods have been provided: | function | description | |----------|-------------| | `eachArrayLike` | Ensure that each item in the array is an array that matches the provided example | | `eachArrayWithMaxLike` | Ensure that each item in the array is an array that matches the provided example and the array is no bigger than the provided max | | `eachArrayWithMinLike` | Ensure that each item in the array is an array that matches the provided example and the array is no smaller than the provided min | For example (with GeoJSON structure): ```java new PactDslJsonBody() .stringType("type","FeatureCollection") .eachLike("features") .stringType("type","Feature") .object("geometry") .stringType("type","Point") .eachArrayLike("coordinates") // coordinates is an array of arrays .decimalType(-7.55717) .decimalType(49.766896) .closeArray() .closeArray() .closeObject() .object("properties") .stringType("prop0","value0") .closeObject() .closeObject() .closeArray() ``` This generated the following JSON: ```json { "features": [ { "geometry": { "coordinates": [[-7.55717, 49.766896]], "type": "Point" }, "type": "Feature", "properties": { "prop0": "value0" } } ], "type": "FeatureCollection" } ``` and will be able to match all coordinates regardless of the number of coordinates. #### Matching any key in a map (3.3.1/2.5.0+) The DSL has been extended for cases where the keys in a map are IDs. For an example of this, see [#313](https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm/issues/313). In this case you can use the `eachKeyLike` method, which takes an example key as a parameter. For example: ```java DslPart body = new PactDslJsonBody() .object("one") .eachKeyLike("001", PactDslJsonRootValue.id(12345L)) // key like an id mapped to a matcher .closeObject() .object("two") .eachKeyLike("001-A") // key like an id where the value is matched by the following example .stringType("description", "Some Description") .closeObject() .closeObject() .object("three") .eachKeyMappedToAnArrayLike("001") // key like an id mapped to an array where each item is matched by the following example .id("someId", 23456L) .closeObject() .closeArray() .closeObject(); ``` For an example, have a look at [WildcardKeysTest](../pact-jvm-consumer-junit/src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/WildcardKeysTest.java). **NOTE:** The `eachKeyLike` method adds a `*` to the matching path, so the matching definition will be applied to all keys of the map if there is not a more specific matcher defined for a particular key. Having more than one `eachKeyLike` condition applied to a map will result in only one being applied when the pact is verified (probably the last). **Further Note: From version 3.5.22 onwards pacts with wildcards applied to map keys will require the Java system property "pact.matching.wildcard" set to value "true" when the pact file is verified.** ### Matching on paths (version 2.1.5+) You can use regular expressions to match incoming requests. The DSL has a `matchPath` method for this. You can provide a real path as a second value to use when generating requests, and if you leave it out it will generate a random one from the regular expression. For example: ```java .given("test state") .uponReceiving("a test interaction") .matchPath("/transaction/[0-9]+") // or .matchPath("/transaction/[0-9]+", "/transaction/1234567890") .method("POST") .body("{\"name\": \"harry\"}") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"hello\": \"harry\"}") ``` ### Matching on headers (version 2.2.2+) You can use regular expressions to match request and response headers. The DSL has a `matchHeader` method for this. You can provide an example header value to use when generating requests and responses, and if you leave it out it will generate a random one from the regular expression. For example: ```java .given("test state") .uponReceiving("a test interaction") .path("/hello") .method("POST") .matchHeader("testreqheader", "test.*value") .body("{\"name\": \"harry\"}") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"hello\": \"harry\"}") .matchHeader("Location", ".*/hello/[0-9]+", "/hello/1234") ``` ### Matching on query parameters (version 3.3.7+) You can use regular expressions to match request query parameters. The DSL has a `matchQuery` method for this. You can provide an example value to use when generating requests, and if you leave it out it will generate a random one from the regular expression. For example: ```java .given("test state") .uponReceiving("a test interaction") .path("/hello") .method("POST") .matchQuery("a", "\\d+", "100") .matchQuery("b", "[A-Z]", "X") .body("{\"name\": \"harry\"}") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"hello\": \"harry\"}") ``` # Forcing pact files to be overwritten (3.6.5+) By default, when the pact file is written, it will be merged with any existing pact file. To force the file to be overwritten, set the Java system property `pact.writer.overwrite` to `true`. # Having values injected from provider state callbacks (3.6.11+) You can have values from the provider state callbacks be injected into most places (paths, query parameters, headers, bodies, etc.). This works by using the V3 spec generators with provider state callbacks that return values. One example of where this would be useful is API calls that require an ID which would be auto-generated by the database on the provider side, so there is no way to know what the ID would be beforehand. The following DSL methods allow you to set an expression that will be parsed with the values returned from the provider states: For JSON bodies, use `valueFromProviderState`.<br/> For headers, use `headerFromProviderState`.<br/> For query parameters, use `queryParameterFromProviderState`.<br/> For paths, use `pathFromProviderState`. For example, assume that an API call is made to get the details of a user by ID. A provider state can be defined that specifies that the user must be exist, but the ID will be created when the user is created. So we can then define an expression for the path where the ID will be replaced with the value returned from the provider state callback. ```java .pathFromProviderState("/api/users/${id}", "/api/users/100") ``` You can also just use the key instead of an expression: ```java .valueFromProviderState('userId', 'userId', 100) // will look value using userId as the key ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-consumer_2.12
Show all versions Show documentation Show source 
 

2 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-consumer_2.12
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.6.15
Last update 29. April 2020
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 12
Dependencies pact-jvm-model, pact-jvm-matchers_2.12, diffutils, automaton, httpclient, json, netty-handler, httpmime, unfiltered-netty-server_2.12, fluent-hc, scala-java8-compat_2.12, groovy-json,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!



Page 1 from 2 (items total 18)


© 2015 - 2021 Weber Informatics LLC