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jas from group de.uni-mannheim.rz.krum (version 2.6.6017)

The Java Algebra System (JAS) is an object oriented, type safe and multi-threaded approach to computer algebra. JAS provides a well designed software library using generic types for algebraic computations implemented in the Java programming language using the JVM runtime infrastructure. The library can be used as any other Java software package or it can be used interactively or interpreted through a jython (Java Python) or jruby (Java Ruby) front end, there is also an Android App based on Ruboto (jruby for Android). The focus of JAS is at the moment on commutative, solvable and non-commutative polynomials, power series, Groebner bases, factorization, real and complex roots and applications. By the use of Java as implementation language JAS is 64-bit and multi-core CPU ready and can make use of mutiple CPUs where available. JAS can run on a wide variety of devices ranging from Android to compute clusters (using MPJ a Java Message Passing Interface (MPI) or OpenMPI).

Group: de.uni-mannheim.rz.krum Artifact: jas
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2 downloads
Artifact jas
Group de.uni-mannheim.rz.krum
Version 2.6.6017
Last update 16. May 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL http://krum.rz.uni-mannheim.de/jas
License GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE Version 2, June 1991
Dependencies amount 2
Dependencies log4j-core, log4j-api,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

sourcetohtml from group com.sourcetohtml (version 0.8.1)

This project aims to build a command line tool that can create HTML view with syntax highlighted source code. It uses Jedit syntax highlighting engine and support all languages that are supported in JEdit. Which are currently: ActionScript, Ada 95, ANTLR, Apache HTTPD, APDL, AppleScript, ASP, Aspect-J, Assembly, AWK, B formal method, Batch, BBj, BCEL, BibTeX, C, C++, C#, CHILL, CIL, COBOL, ColdFusion, CSS, CVS Commit, D, DOxygen, DSSSL, Eiffel, EmbPerl, Erlang, Factor, Fortran, Foxpro, FreeMarker, Fortran, Gettext, Groovy, Haskell, HTML, Icon, IDL, Inform, INI, Inno Setup, Informix 4GL, Interlis, Io, Java, JavaScript, JCL, JHTML, JMK, JSP, Latex, Lilypond, Lisp, LOTOS, Lua, Makefile, Maple, ML, Modula-3, MoinMoin, MQSC, NetRexx, NQC, NSIS2, Objective C, ObjectRexx, Occam, Omnimark, Parrot, Pascal, Patch, Perl, PHP, Pike, PL-SQL, PL/I, Pop11, PostScript, Povray, PowerDynamo, Progress 4GL, Prolog, Properties, PSP, PV-WAVE, Pyrex, Python, REBOL, Redcode, Relax-NG, RelationalView, Rest, Rib, RPM spec, RTF, Ruby, Ruby-HTML, RView, S+, S#, SAS, Scheme, SDL/PL, SGML, Shell Script, SHTML, Smalltalk, SMI MIB, SQR, Squidconf, SVN Commit, Swig, TCL, TeX, Texinfo, TPL, Transact-SQL, UnrealScript, VBScript, Velocity, Verilog, VHDL, XML, XSL, ZPT

Group: com.sourcetohtml Artifact: sourcetohtml
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Artifact sourcetohtml
Group com.sourcetohtml
Version 0.8.1
Last update 31. March 2009
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL http://www.sourcetohtml.com
License GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE, version 3
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

minitest from group rubygems (version 5.4.1)

minitest provides a complete suite of testing facilities supporting TDD, BDD, mocking, and benchmarking. "I had a class with Jim Weirich on testing last week and we were allowed to choose our testing frameworks. Kirk Haines and I were paired up and we cracked open the code for a few test frameworks... I MUST say that minitest is *very* readable / understandable compared to the 'other two' options we looked at. Nicely done and thank you for helping us keep our mental sanity." -- Wayne E. Seguin minitest/unit is a small and incredibly fast unit testing framework. It provides a rich set of assertions to make your tests clean and readable. minitest/spec is a functionally complete spec engine. It hooks onto minitest/unit and seamlessly bridges test assertions over to spec expectations. minitest/benchmark is an awesome way to assert the performance of your algorithms in a repeatable manner. Now you can assert that your newb co-worker doesn't replace your linear algorithm with an exponential one! minitest/mock by Steven Baker, is a beautifully tiny mock (and stub) object framework. minitest/pride shows pride in testing and adds coloring to your test output. I guess it is an example of how to write IO pipes too. :P minitest/unit is meant to have a clean implementation for language implementors that need a minimal set of methods to bootstrap a working test suite. For example, there is no magic involved for test-case discovery. "Again, I can't praise enough the idea of a testing/specing framework that I can actually read in full in one sitting!" -- Piotr Szotkowski Comparing to rspec: rspec is a testing DSL. minitest is ruby. -- Adam Hawkins, "Bow Before MiniTest" minitest doesn't reinvent anything that ruby already provides, like: classes, modules, inheritance, methods. This means you only have to learn ruby to use minitest and all of your regular OO practices like extract-method refactorings still apply.

Group: rubygems Artifact: minitest
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Artifact minitest
Group rubygems
Version 5.4.1
Last update 28. March 2015
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/seattlerb/minitest
License MIT
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-server from group au.com.dius.pact (version 4.2.0-beta.0)

Pact server =========== The pact server is a stand-alone interactions recorder and verifier, aimed at clients that are non-JVM or non-Ruby based. The pact client for that platform will need to be implemented, but it only be responsible for generating the `JSON` interactions, running the tests and communicating with the server. The server implements a `JSON` `REST` Admin API with the following endpoints. / -> For diagnostics, currently returns a list of ports of the running mock servers. /create -> For initialising a test server and submitting the JSON interactions. It returns a port /complete -> For finalising and verifying the interactions with the server. It writes the `JSON` pact file to disk. /publish -> For publishing contracts. It takes a contract from disk and publishes it to the configured broker ## Running the server Pact server takes the following parameters: ``` Usage: pact-jvm-server [options] [port] port port to run on (defaults to 29999) --help prints this usage text -h <value> | --host <value> host to bind to (defaults to localhost) -l <value> | --mock-port-lower <value> lower bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 20000) -u <value> | --mock-port-upper <value> upper bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 40000) -d | --daemon run as a daemon process -v <value> | --pact-version <value> pact version to generate for (2 or 3) -k <value> | --keystore-path <value> Path to keystore -p <value> | --keystore-password <value> Keystore password -s <value> | --ssl-port <value> Ssl port the mock server should run on. lower and upper bounds are ignored -b <value> | --broker <value> The baseUrl of the broker to publish contracts to (for example https://organization.broker.com -t <value | --token <value> API token for authentication to the pact broker --debug run with debug logging ``` ### Using trust store Trust store can be used. However, it is limited to a single port for the time being. ### Using a distribution archive You can download a [distribution from maven central](http://search.maven.org/remotecontent?filepath=au/com/dius/pact/pact-jvm-server/4.1.0/). There is both a ZIP and TAR archive. Unpack it to a directory of choice and then run the script in the bin directory. ### Building a distribution bundle You can build an application bundle with gradle by running: $ ./gradlew :pact-jvm-server:installdist This will create an app bundle in `build/install/pact-jvm-server`. You can then execute it with: $ java -jar pact-jvm-server/build/install/pact-jvm-server/lib/pact-jvm-server-4.0.1.jar or with the generated bundle script file: $ pact-jvm-server/build/install/pact-jvm-server/bin/pact-jvm-server By default will run on port `29999` but a port number can be optionally supplied. ### Running it with docker You can use a docker image to execute the mock server as a docker container. $ docker run -d -p 8080:8080 -p 20000-20010:20000-20010 uglyog/pact-jvm-server This will run the main server on port 8080, and each created mock server on ports 20000-20010. You can map the ports to any you require. ## Life cycle The following actions are expected to occur * The client calls `/create` to initialise a server with the expected `JSON` interactions and state * The admin server will start a mock server on a random port and return the port number in the response * The client will execute its interaction tests against the mock server with the supplied port * Once finished, the client will call `/complete' on the Admin API, posting the port number * The pact server will verify the interactions and write the `JSON` `pact` file to disk under `/target` * The mock server running on the supplied port will be shutdown. * The client will call `/publish` to publish the created contract to the configured pact broker ## Endpoints ### /create The client will need `POST` to `/create` the generated `JSON` interactions, also providing a state as a query parameter and a path. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/create?state=NoUsers&path=/sub/ref/path '{ "provider": { "name": "Animal_Service"}, ... }' This will create a new running mock service provider on a randomly generated port. The port will be returned in the `201` response: { "port" : 34423 } But you can also reference the path from `/sub/ref/path` using the server port. The service will not strip the prefix path, but instead will use it as a differentiator. If your services do not have differences in the prefix of their path, then you will have to use the port method. ### /complete Once the client has finished running its tests against the mock server on the supplied port (in this example port `34423`) the client will need to `POST` to `/complete` the port number of the mock server that was used. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/complete '{ "port" : 34423 }' This will cause the Pact server to verify the interactions, shutdown the mock server running on that port and writing the pact `JSON` file to disk under the `target` directory. ### /publish Once all interactions have been tested the `/publish` endpoint can be called to publish the created pact to the pact broker For this it is required to run the pact-jvm-server with the -b parameter to configure the pact broker to publish the pacts to. Optionaly an authentication token can be used for authentication against the broker. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/publish '{ "consumer": "Zoo", "consumerVersion": "0.0.1", "provider": "Animal_Service" }' This will cause the Pact server to check for the pact `Zoo-Animal_Service.json` on disk under `target` and publish it to the configured pact broker. After a successful publish the pact will be removed from disk. ### / The `/` endpoint is for diagnostics and to check that the pact server is running. It will return all the currently running mock servers port numbers. For example: GET http://localhost:29999/ '{ "ports": [23443,43232] }'

Group: au.com.dius.pact Artifact: pact-jvm-server
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0 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-server
Group au.com.dius.pact
Version 4.2.0-beta.0
Last update 18. October 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-server_2.12 from group au.com.dius (version 3.6.15)

Pact server =========== The pact server is a stand-alone interactions recorder and verifier, aimed at clients that are non-JVM or non-Ruby based. The pact client for that platform will need to be implemented, but it only be responsible for generating the `JSON` interactions, running the tests and communicating with the server. The server implements a `JSON` `REST` Admin API with the following endpoints. / -> For diagnostics, currently returns a list of ports of the running mock servers. /create -> For initialising a test server and submitting the JSON interactions. It returns a port /complete -> For finalising and verifying the interactions with the server. It writes the `JSON` pact file to disk. ## Running the server ### Versions 2.2.6+ Pact server takes the following parameters: ``` Usage: pact-jvm-server [options] [port] port port to run on (defaults to 29999) --help prints this usage text -h <value> | --host <value> host to bind to (defaults to localhost) -l <value> | --mock-port-lower <value> lower bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 20000) -u <value> | --mock-port-upper <value> upper bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 40000) -d | --daemon run as a daemon process -v <value> | --pact-version <value> pact version to generate for (2 or 3) -k <value> | --keystore-path <value> Path to keystore -p <value> | --keystore-password <value> Keystore password -s <value> | --ssl-port <value> Ssl port the mock server should run on. lower and upper bounds are ignored --debug run with debug logging ``` ### Using trust store 3.4.0+ Trust store can be used. However, it is limited to a single port for the time being. ### Prior to version 2.2.6 Pact server takes one optional parameter, the port number to listen on. If not provided, it will listen on 29999. It requires an active console to run. ### Using a distribution archive You can download a [distribution from maven central](http://search.maven.org/remotecontent?filepath=au/com/dius/pact-jvm-server_2.11/2.2.4/). There is both a ZIP and TAR archive. Unpack it to a directory of choice and then run the script in the bin directory. ### Building a distribution bundle You can build an application bundle with gradle by running (for 2.11 version): $ ./gradlew :pact-jvm-server_2.11:installdist This will create an app bundle in `build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11`. You can then execute it with: $ java -jar pact-jvm-server/build/2.10/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/lib/pact-jvm-server_2.11-3.2.11.jar or with the generated bundle script file: $ pact-jvm-server/build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/bin/pact-jvm-server_2.11 By default will run on port `29999` but a port number can be optionally supplied. ### Running it with docker You can use a docker image to execute the mock server as a docker container. $ docker run -d -p 8080:8080 -p 20000-20010:20000-20010 uglyog/pact-jvm-server This will run the main server on port 8080, and each created mock server on ports 20000-20010. You can map the ports to any you require. ## Life cycle The following actions are expected to occur * The client calls `/create` to initialise a server with the expected `JSON` interactions and state * The admin server will start a mock server on a random port and return the port number in the response * The client will execute its interaction tests against the mock server with the supplied port * Once finished, the client will call `/complete' on the Admin API, posting the port number * The pact server will verify the interactions and write the `JSON` `pact` file to disk under `/target` * The mock server running on the supplied port will be shutdown. ## Endpoints ### /create The client will need `POST` to `/create` the generated `JSON` interactions, also providing a state as a query parameter and a path. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/create?state=NoUsers&path=/sub/ref/path '{ "provider": { "name": "Animal_Service"}, ... }' This will create a new running mock service provider on a randomly generated port. The port will be returned in the `201` response: { "port" : 34423 } But you can also reference the path from `/sub/ref/path` using the server port. The service will not strip the prefix path, but instead will use it as a differentiator. If your services do not have differences in the prefix of their path, then you will have to use the port method. ### /complete Once the client has finished running its tests against the mock server on the supplied port (in this example port `34423`) the client will need to `POST` to `/complete` the port number of the mock server that was used. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/complete '{ "port" : 34423 }' This will cause the Pact server to verify the interactions, shutdown the mock server running on that port and writing the pact `JSON` file to disk under the `target` directory. ### / The `/` endpoint is for diagnostics and to check that the pact server is running. It will return all the currently running mock servers port numbers. For example: GET http://localhost:29999/ '{ "ports": [23443,43232] }'

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-server_2.12
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2 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-server_2.12
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.6.15
Last update 29. April 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 4
Dependencies pact-jvm-consumer_2.12, logback-core, logback-classic, scopt_2.12,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-server from group au.com.dius (version 4.0.10)

Pact server =========== The pact server is a stand-alone interactions recorder and verifier, aimed at clients that are non-JVM or non-Ruby based. The pact client for that platform will need to be implemented, but it only be responsible for generating the `JSON` interactions, running the tests and communicating with the server. The server implements a `JSON` `REST` Admin API with the following endpoints. / -> For diagnostics, currently returns a list of ports of the running mock servers. /create -> For initialising a test server and submitting the JSON interactions. It returns a port /complete -> For finalising and verifying the interactions with the server. It writes the `JSON` pact file to disk. ## Running the server ### Versions 2.2.6+ Pact server takes the following parameters: ``` Usage: pact-jvm-server [options] [port] port port to run on (defaults to 29999) --help prints this usage text -h <value> | --host <value> host to bind to (defaults to localhost) -l <value> | --mock-port-lower <value> lower bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 20000) -u <value> | --mock-port-upper <value> upper bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 40000) -d | --daemon run as a daemon process -v <value> | --pact-version <value> pact version to generate for (2 or 3) -k <value> | --keystore-path <value> Path to keystore -p <value> | --keystore-password <value> Keystore password -s <value> | --ssl-port <value> Ssl port the mock server should run on. lower and upper bounds are ignored --debug run with debug logging ``` ### Using trust store 3.4.0+ Trust store can be used. However, it is limited to a single port for the time being. ### Prior to version 2.2.6 Pact server takes one optional parameter, the port number to listen on. If not provided, it will listen on 29999. It requires an active console to run. ### Using a distribution archive You can download a [distribution from maven central](http://search.maven.org/remotecontent?filepath=au/com/dius/pact-jvm-server_2.11/2.2.4/). There is both a ZIP and TAR archive. Unpack it to a directory of choice and then run the script in the bin directory. ### Building a distribution bundle You can build an application bundle with gradle by running (for 2.11 version): $ ./gradlew :pact-jvm-server_2.11:installdist This will create an app bundle in `build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11`. You can then execute it with: $ java -jar pact-jvm-server/build/2.10/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/lib/pact-jvm-server_2.11-3.2.11.jar or with the generated bundle script file: $ pact-jvm-server/build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/bin/pact-jvm-server_2.11 By default will run on port `29999` but a port number can be optionally supplied. ### Running it with docker You can use a docker image to execute the mock server as a docker container. $ docker run -d -p 8080:8080 -p 20000-20010:20000-20010 uglyog/pact-jvm-server This will run the main server on port 8080, and each created mock server on ports 20000-20010. You can map the ports to any you require. ## Life cycle The following actions are expected to occur * The client calls `/create` to initialise a server with the expected `JSON` interactions and state * The admin server will start a mock server on a random port and return the port number in the response * The client will execute its interaction tests against the mock server with the supplied port * Once finished, the client will call `/complete' on the Admin API, posting the port number * The pact server will verify the interactions and write the `JSON` `pact` file to disk under `/target` * The mock server running on the supplied port will be shutdown. ## Endpoints ### /create The client will need `POST` to `/create` the generated `JSON` interactions, also providing a state as a query parameter and a path. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/create?state=NoUsers&path=/sub/ref/path '{ "provider": { "name": "Animal_Service"}, ... }' This will create a new running mock service provider on a randomly generated port. The port will be returned in the `201` response: { "port" : 34423 } But you can also reference the path from `/sub/ref/path` using the server port. The service will not strip the prefix path, but instead will use it as a differentiator. If your services do not have differences in the prefix of their path, then you will have to use the port method. ### /complete Once the client has finished running its tests against the mock server on the supplied port (in this example port `34423`) the client will need to `POST` to `/complete` the port number of the mock server that was used. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/complete '{ "port" : 34423 }' This will cause the Pact server to verify the interactions, shutdown the mock server running on that port and writing the pact `JSON` file to disk under the `target` directory. ### / The `/` endpoint is for diagnostics and to check that the pact server is running. It will return all the currently running mock servers port numbers. For example: GET http://localhost:29999/ '{ "ports": [23443,43232] }'

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-server
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0 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-server
Group au.com.dius
Version 4.0.10
Last update 18. April 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-server_2.11 from group au.com.dius (version 3.5.17)

Pact server =========== The pact server is a stand-alone interactions recorder and verifier, aimed at clients that are non-JVM or non-Ruby based. The pact client for that platform will need to be implemented, but it only be responsible for generating the `JSON` interactions, running the tests and communicating with the server. The server implements a `JSON` `REST` Admin API with the following endpoints. / -> For diagnostics, currently returns a list of ports of the running mock servers. /create -> For initialising a test server and submitting the JSON interactions. It returns a port /complete -> For finalising and verifying the interactions with the server. It writes the `JSON` pact file to disk. ## Running the server ### Versions 2.2.6+ Pact server takes the following parameters: ``` Usage: pact-jvm-server [options] [port] port port to run on (defaults to 29999) --help prints this usage text -h <value> | --host <value> host to bind to (defaults to localhost) -l <value> | --mock-port-lower <value> lower bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 20000) -u <value> | --mock-port-upper <value> upper bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 40000) -d | --daemon run as a daemon process -v <value> | --pact-version <value> pact version to generate for (2 or 3) -k <value> | --keystore-path <value> Path to keystore -p <value> | --keystore-password <value> Keystore password -s <value> | --ssl-port <value> Ssl port the mock server should run on. lower and upper bounds are ignored --debug run with debug logging ``` ### Using trust store 3.4.0+ Trust store can be used. However, it is limited to a single port for the time being. ### Prior to version 2.2.6 Pact server takes one optional parameter, the port number to listen on. If not provided, it will listen on 29999. It requires an active console to run. ### Using a distribution archive You can download a [distribution from maven central](http://search.maven.org/remotecontent?filepath=au/com/dius/pact-jvm-server_2.11/2.2.4/). There is both a ZIP and TAR archive. Unpack it to a directory of choice and then run the script in the bin directory. ### Building a distribution bundle You can build an application bundle with gradle by running (for 2.11 version): $ ./gradlew :pact-jvm-server_2.11:installdist This will create an app bundle in `build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11`. You can then execute it with: $ java -jar pact-jvm-server/build/2.10/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/lib/pact-jvm-server_2.11-3.2.11.jar or with the generated bundle script file: $ pact-jvm-server/build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/bin/pact-jvm-server_2.11 By default will run on port `29999` but a port number can be optionally supplied. ### Running it with docker You can use a docker image to execute the mock server as a docker container. $ docker run -d -p 8080:8080 -p 20000-20010:20000-20010 uglyog/pact-jvm-server This will run the main server on port 8080, and each created mock server on ports 20000-20010. You can map the ports to any you require. ## Life cycle The following actions are expected to occur * The client calls `/create` to initialise a server with the expected `JSON` interactions and state * The admin server will start a mock server on a random port and return the port number in the response * The client will execute its interaction tests against the mock server with the supplied port * Once finished, the client will call `/complete' on the Admin API, posting the port number * The pact server will verify the interactions and write the `JSON` `pact` file to disk under `/target` * The mock server running on the supplied port will be shutdown. ## Endpoints ### /create The client will need `POST` to `/create` the generated `JSON` interactions, also providing a state as a query parameter and a path. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/create?state=NoUsers&path=/sub/ref/path '{ "provider": { "name": "Animal_Service"}, ... }' This will create a new running mock service provider on a randomly generated port. The port will be returned in the `201` response: { "port" : 34423 } But you can also reference the path from `/sub/ref/path` using the server port. The service will not strip the prefix path, but instead will use it as a differentiator. If your services do not have differences in the prefix of their path, then you will have to use the port method. ### /complete Once the client has finished running its tests against the mock server on the supplied port (in this example port `34423`) the client will need to `POST` to `/complete` the port number of the mock server that was used. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/complete '{ "port" : 34423 }' This will cause the Pact server to verify the interactions, shutdown the mock server running on that port and writing the pact `JSON` file to disk under the `target` directory. ### / The `/` endpoint is for diagnostics and to check that the pact server is running. It will return all the currently running mock servers port numbers. For example: GET http://localhost:29999/ '{ "ports": [23443,43232] }'

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-server_2.11
Show all versions Show documentation Show source 
 

1 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-server_2.11
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.5.17
Last update 03. June 2018
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 11
Dependencies kotlin-stdlib-jre8, kotlin-reflect, slf4j-api, groovy-all, kotlin-logging, scala-library, scala-logging_2.11, pact-jvm-consumer_2.11, logback-core, logback-classic, scopt_2.11,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-server_2.10 from group au.com.dius (version 2.4.20)

Pact server =========== The pact server is a stand-alone interactions recorder and verifier, aimed at clients that are non-JVM or non-Ruby based. The pact client for that platform will need to be implemented, but it only be responsible for generating the `JSON` interactions, running the tests and communicating with the server. The server implements a `JSON` `REST` Admin API with the following endpoints. / -> For diagnostics, currently returns a list of ports of the running mock servers. /create -> For initialising a test server and submitting the JSON interactions. It returns a port /complete -> For finalising and verifying the interactions with the server. It writes the `JSON` pact file to disk. ## Running the server ### Versions 2.2.6+ Pact server takes the following parameters: ``` Usage: pact-jvm-server [options] [port] port port to run on (defaults to 29999) --help prints this usage text -h <value> | --host <value> host to bind to (defaults to localhost) -l <value> | --mock-port-lower <value> lower bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 20000) -u <value> | --mock-port-upper <value> upper bound to allocate mock ports (defaults to 40000) -d | --daemon run as a daemon process --debug run with debug logging ``` ### Prior to version 2.2.6 Pact server takes one optional parameter, the port number to listen on. If not provided, it will listen on 29999. It requires an active console to run. ### Using a distribution archive You can download a [distribution from maven central](http://search.maven.org/remotecontent?filepath=au/com/dius/pact-jvm-server_2.11/2.2.4/). There is both a ZIP and TAR archive. Unpack it to a directory of choice and then run the script in the bin directory. ### Building a distribution bundle You can build an application bundle with gradle by running (for 2.11 version): $ ./gradlew :pact-jvm-server_2.11:installdist This will create an app bundle in `build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11`. You can then execute it with: $ java -jar pact-jvm-server/build/2.10/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/lib/pact-jvm-server_2.11-2.2.4.jar or with the generated bundle script file: $ pact-jvm-server/build/2.11/install/pact-jvm-server_2.11/bin/pact-jvm-server_2.11 By default will run on port `29999` but a port number can be optionally supplied. ### Running it with docker You can use a docker image to execute the mock server as a docker container. $ docker run -d -p 8080:8080 -p 20000-20010:20000-20010 uglyog/pact-jvm-server This will run the main server on port 8080, and each created mock server on ports 20000-20010. You can map the ports to any you require. ## Life cycle The following actions are expected to occur * The client calls `/create` to initialise a server with the expected `JSON` interactions and state * The admin server will start a mock server on a random port and return the port number in the response * The client will execute its interaction tests against the mock server with the supplied port * Once finished, the client will call `/complete' on the Admin API, posting the port number * The pact server will verify the interactions and write the `JSON` `pact` file to disk under `/target` * The mock server running on the supplied port will be shutdown. ## Endpoints ### /create The client will need `POST` to `/create` the generated `JSON` interactions, also providing a state as a query parameter. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/create?state=NoUsers '{ "provider": { "name": "Animal_Service"}, ... }' This will create a new running mock service provider on a randomly generated port. The port will be returned in the `201` response: { "port" : 34423 } ### /complete Once the client has finished running its tests against the mock server on the supplied port (in this example port `34423`) the client will need to `POST` to `/complete` the port number of the mock server that was used. For example: POST http://localhost:29999/complete '{ "port" : 34423 }' This will cause the Pact server to verify the interactions, shutdown the mock server running on that port and writing the pact `JSON` file to disk under the `target` directory. ### / The `/` endpoint is for diagnostics and to check that the pact server is running. It will return all the currently running mock servers port numbers. For example: GET http://localhost:29999/ '{ "ports": [23443,43232] }'

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-server_2.10
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Artifact pact-jvm-server_2.10
Group au.com.dius
Version 2.4.20
Last update 14. April 2018
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 6
Dependencies slf4j-api, scala-library, pact-jvm-consumer_2.10, logback-core, logback-classic, scopt_2.10,
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maven from group au.com.dius.pact.provider (version 4.2.0-beta.0)

Maven plugin to verify a provider ================================= Maven plugin for verifying pacts against a provider. **NOTE: If you are running your tests with the JUnit runners, you do not need this plugin.** The Maven plugin provides a `verify` goal which will verify all configured pacts against your provider. ## To Use It ### 1. Add the pact-jvm-provider-maven plugin to your `build` section of your pom file. ```xml <build> [...] <plugins> [...] <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> </plugin> [...] </plugins> [...] </build> ``` ### 2. Define the pacts between your consumers and providers You define all the providers and consumers within the configuration element of the maven plugin. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <!-- You can define as many as you need, but each must have a unique name --> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <!-- All the provider properties are optional, and have sensible defaults (shown below) --> <protocol>http</protocol> <host>localhost</host> <port>8080</port> <path>/</path> <consumers> <!-- Again, you can define as many consumers for each provider as you need, but each must have a unique name --> <consumer> <name>consumer1</name> <!-- currently supports a file path using pactFile or a URL using pactUrl --> <pactFile>path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json</pactFile> </consumer> </consumers> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ### 3. Execute `mvn pact:verify` You will have to have your provider running for this to pass. ## Verifying all pact files in a directory for a provider You can specify a directory that contains pact files, and the Pact plugin will scan for all pact files that match that provider and define a consumer for each pact file in the directory. Consumer name is read from contents of pact file. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <!-- You can define as many as you need, but each must have a unique name --> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <!-- All the provider properties are optional, and have sensible defaults (shown below) --> <protocol>http</protocol> <host>localhost</host> <port>8080</port> <path>/</path> <pactFileDirectory>path/to/pacts</pactFileDirectory> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ### Verifying all pact files from multiple directories for a provider If you want to specify multiple directories, you can use `pactFileDirectories`. The plugin will only fail the build if no pact files are loaded after processing all the directories in the list. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <pactFileDirectories> <pactFileDirectory>path/to/pacts1</pactFileDirectory> <pactFileDirectory>path/to/pacts2</pactFileDirectory> </pactFileDirectories> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ## Enabling insecure SSL For providers that are running on SSL with self-signed certificates, you need to enable insecure SSL mode by setting `<insecure>true</insecure>` on the provider. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <pactFileDirectory>path/to/pacts</pactFileDirectory> <insecure>true</insecure> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ## Specifying a custom trust store For environments that are running their own certificate chains: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <pactFileDirectory>path/to/pacts</pactFileDirectory> <trustStore>relative/path/to/trustStore.jks</trustStore> <trustStorePassword>changeit</trustStorePassword> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` `trustStore` is either relative to the current working (build) directory. `trustStorePassword` defaults to `changeit`. NOTE: The hostname will still be verified against the certificate. ## Modifying the requests before they are sent Sometimes you may need to add things to the requests that can't be persisted in a pact file. Examples of these would be authentication tokens, which have a small life span. The Pact Maven plugin provides a request filter that can be set to a Groovy script on the provider that will be called before the request is made. This script will receive the HttpRequest bound to a variable named `request` prior to it being executed. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <requestFilter> // This is a Groovy script that adds an Authorization header to each request request.addHeader('Authorization', 'oauth-token eyJhbGciOiJSUzI1NiIsIm...') </requestFilter> <consumers> <consumer> <name>consumer1</name> <pactFile>path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json</pactFile> </consumer> </consumers> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` __*Important Note:*__ You should only use this feature for things that can not be persisted in the pact file. By modifying the request, you are potentially modifying the contract from the consumer tests! ## Modifying the HTTP Client Used The default HTTP client is used for all requests to providers (created with a call to `HttpClients.createDefault()`). This can be changed by specifying a closure assigned to createClient on the provider that returns a CloseableHttpClient. For example: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <createClient> // This is a Groovy script that will enable the client to accept self-signed certificates import org.apache.http.ssl.SSLContextBuilder import org.apache.http.conn.ssl.NoopHostnameVerifier import org.apache.http.impl.client.HttpClients HttpClients.custom().setSSLHostnameVerifier(new NoopHostnameVerifier()) .setSslcontext(new SSLContextBuilder().loadTrustMaterial(null, { x509Certificates, s -> true }) .build()) .build() </createClient> <consumers> <consumer> <name>consumer1</name> <pactFile>path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json</pactFile> </consumer> </consumers> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ## Turning off URL decoding of the paths in the pact file By default the paths loaded from the pact file will be decoded before the request is sent to the provider. To turn this behaviour off, set the system property `pact.verifier.disableUrlPathDecoding` to `true`. __*Important Note:*__ If you turn off the url path decoding, you need to ensure that the paths in the pact files are correctly encoded. The verifier will not be able to make a request with an invalid encoded path. ## Plugin Properties The following plugin properties can be specified with `-Dproperty=value` on the command line or in the configuration section: |Property|Description| |--------|-----------| |`pact.showStacktrace`|This turns on stacktrace printing for each request. It can help with diagnosing network errors| |`pact.showFullDiff`|This turns on displaying the full diff of the expected versus actual bodies| |`pact.filter.consumers`|Comma separated list of consumer names to verify| |`pact.filter.description`|Only verify interactions whose description match the provided regular expression| |`pact.filter.providerState`|Only verify interactions whose provider state match the provided regular expression. An empty string matches interactions that have no state| |`pact.filter.pacturl`|This filter allows just the just the changed pact specified in a webhook to be run. It should be used in conjunction with `pact.filter.consumers`| |`pact.verifier.publishResults`|Publishing of verification results will be skipped unless this property is set to `true` [version 3.5.18+]| |`pact.matching.wildcard`|Enables matching of map values ignoring the keys when this property is set to `true`| |`pact.verifier.disableUrlPathDecoding`|Disables decoding of request paths| |`pact.pactbroker.httpclient.usePreemptiveAuthentication`|Enables preemptive authentication with the pact broker when set to `true`| |`pact.consumer.tags`|Overrides the tags used when publishing pacts [version 4.0.7+]| |`pact.content_type.override.<TYPE>.<SUBTYPE>=text\|binary`|Overrides the handling of a particular content type [version 4.1.3+]| Example in the configuration section: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <consumers> <consumer> <name>consumer1</name> <pactFile>path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json</pactFile> </consumer> </consumers> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> <configuration> <pact.showStacktrace>true</pact.showStacktrace> </configuration> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ## Provider States For each provider you can specify a state change URL to use to switch the state of the provider. This URL will receive the providerState description and parameters from the pact file before each interaction via a POST. The stateChangeUsesBody controls if the state is passed in the request body or as query parameters. These values can be set at the provider level, or for a specific consumer. Consumer values take precedent if both are given. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <stateChangeUrl>http://localhost:8080/tasks/pactStateChange</stateChangeUrl> <stateChangeUsesBody>false</stateChangeUsesBody> <!-- defaults to true --> <consumers> <consumer> <name>consumer1</name> <pactFile>path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json</pactFile> <stateChangeUrl>http://localhost:8080/tasks/pactStateChangeForConsumer1</stateChangeUrl> <stateChangeUsesBody>false</stateChangeUsesBody> <!-- defaults to true --> </consumer> </consumers> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` If the `stateChangeUsesBody` is not specified, or is set to true, then the provider state description and parameters will be sent as JSON in the body of the request. If it is set to false, they will passed as query parameters. As for normal requests (see Modifying the requests before they are sent), a state change request can be modified before it is sent. Set `stateChangeRequestFilter` to a Groovy script on the provider that will be called before the request is made. #### Teardown calls for state changes You can enable teardown state change calls by setting the property `<stateChangeTeardown>true</stateChangeTeardown>` on the provider. This will add an `action` parameter to the state change call. The setup call before the test will receive `action=setup`, and then a teardown call will be made afterwards to the state change URL with `action=teardown`. #### Returning values that can be injected You can have values from the provider state callbacks be injected into most places (paths, query parameters, headers, bodies, etc.). This works by using the V3 spec generators with provider state callbacks that return values. One example of where this would be useful is API calls that require an ID which would be auto-generated by the database on the provider side, so there is no way to know what the ID would be beforehand. There are methods on the consumer DSLs that can provider an expression that contains variables (like '/api/user/${id}' for the path). The provider state callback can then return a map for values, and the `id` attribute from the map will be expanded in the expression. For URL callbacks, the values need to be returned as JSON in the response body. ## Verifying pact files from a pact broker You can setup your build to validate against the pacts stored in a pact broker. The pact plugin will query the pact broker for all consumers that have a pact with the provider based on its name. To use it, just configure the `pactBrokerUrl` or `pactBroker` value for the provider with the base URL to the pact broker. For example: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <stateChangeUrl>http://localhost:8080/tasks/pactStateChange</stateChangeUrl> <pactBrokerUrl>http://pact-broker:5000/</pactBrokerUrl> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ### Verifying pacts from an authenticated pact broker If your pact broker requires authentication (basic and bearer authentication are supported), you can configure the username and password to use by configuring the `authentication` element of the `pactBroker` element of your provider. For example, here is how you configure the plugin to use basic authentication for verifying pacts: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <stateChangeUrl>http://localhost:8080/tasks/pactStateChange</stateChangeUrl> <pactBroker> <url>http://pactbroker:1234</url> <authentication> <scheme>basic</scheme> <username>test</username> <password>test</password> </authentication> </pactBroker> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` Here is how you configure the plugin to use bearer token authentication for verifying pacts ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <stateChangeUrl>http://localhost:8080/tasks/pactStateChange</stateChangeUrl> <pactBroker> <url>http://pactbroker:1234</url> <authentication> <scheme>bearer</scheme> <token>TOKEN</token> </authentication> </pactBroker> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` Preemptive Authentication can be enabled by setting the `pact.pactbroker.httpclient.usePreemptiveAuthentication` Java system property to `true`. ### Allowing just the changed pact specified in a webhook to be verified [4.0.6+] When a consumer publishes a new version of a pact file, the Pact broker can fire off a webhook with the URL of the changed pact file. To allow only the changed pact file to be verified, you can override the URL by using the `pact.filter.consumers` and `pact.filter.pacturl` Java system properties. For example, running: ```console mvn pact:verify -Dpact.filter.consumers='Foo Web Client' -Dpact.filter.pacturl=https://test.pact.dius.com.au/pacts/provider/Activity%20Service/consumer/Foo%20Web%20Client/version/1.0.1 ``` will only run the verification for Foo Web Client with the given pact file URL. #### Using the Maven servers configuration You can use the servers setup in the Maven settings. To do this, setup a server as per the [Maven Server Settings](https://maven.apache.org/settings.html#Servers). Then set the server ID in the pact broker configuration in your POM. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <stateChangeUrl>http://localhost:8080/tasks/pactStateChange</stateChangeUrl> <pactBroker> <url>http://pactbroker:1234</url> <serverId>test-pact-broker</serverId> <!-- This must match the server id in the maven settings --> </pactBroker> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ### Verifying pacts from a pact broker that match particular tags If your pacts in your pact broker have been tagged, you can set the tags to fetch by configuring the `tags` element of the `pactBroker` element of your provider. For example: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>provider1</name> <stateChangeUrl>http://localhost:8080/tasks/pactStateChange</stateChangeUrl> <pactBroker> <url>http://pactbroker:1234</url> <tags> <tag>TEST</tag> <tag>DEV</tag> </tags> </pactBroker> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` This example will fetch and validate the pacts for the TEST and DEV tags. ## Filtering the interactions that are verified You can filter the interactions that are run using three properties: `pact.filter.consumers`, `pact.filter.description` and `pact.filter.providerState`. Adding `-Dpact.filter.consumers=consumer1,consumer2` to the command line or configuration section will only run the pact files for those consumers (consumer1 and consumer2). Adding `-Dpact.filter.description=a request for payment.*` will only run those interactions whose descriptions start with 'a request for payment'. `-Dpact.filter.providerState=.*payment` will match any interaction that has a provider state that ends with payment, and `-Dpact.filter.providerState=` will match any interaction that does not have a provider state. ## Not failing the build if no pact files are found By default, if there are no pact files to verify, the plugin will raise an exception. This is to guard against false positives where the build is passing but nothing has been verified due to mis-configuration. To disable this behaviour, set the `failIfNoPactsFound` parameter to `false`. # Verifying a message provider The Maven plugin has been updated to allow invoking test methods that can return the message contents from a message producer. To use it, set the way to invoke the verification to `ANNOTATED_METHOD`. This will allow the pact verification task to scan for test methods that return the message contents. Add something like the following to your maven pom file: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>messageProvider</name> <verificationType>ANNOTATED_METHOD</verificationType> <!-- packagesToScan is optional, but leaving it out will result in the entire test classpath being scanned. Set it to the packages where your annotated test method can be found. --> <packagesToScan> <packageToScan>au.com.example.messageprovider.*</packageToScan> </packagesToScan> <consumers> <consumer> <name>consumer1</name> <pactFile>path/to/messageprovider-consumer1-pact.json</pactFile> </consumer> </consumers> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> </configuration> </plugin> ``` Now when the pact verify task is run, will look for methods annotated with `@PactVerifyProvider` in the test classpath that have a matching description to what is in the pact file. ```groovy class ConfirmationKafkaMessageBuilderTest { @PactVerifyProvider('an order confirmation message') String verifyMessageForOrder() { Order order = new Order() order.setId(10000004) order.setExchange('ASX') order.setSecurityCode('CBA') order.setPrice(BigDecimal.TEN) order.setUnits(15) order.setGst(new BigDecimal('15.0')) odrer.setFees(BigDecimal.TEN) def message = new ConfirmationKafkaMessageBuilder() .withOrder(order) .build() JsonOutput.toJson(message) } } ``` It will then validate that the returned contents matches the contents for the message in the pact file. ## Changing the class path that is scanned By default, the test classpath is scanned for annotated methods. You can override this by setting the `classpathElements` property: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <serviceProviders> <serviceProvider> <name>messageProvider</name> <verificationType>ANNOTATED_METHOD</verificationType> <consumers> <consumer> <name>consumer1</name> <pactFile>path/to/messageprovider-consumer1-pact.json</pactFile> </consumer> </consumers> </serviceProvider> </serviceProviders> <classpathElements> <classpathElement> build/classes/test </classpathElement> </classpathElements> </configuration> </plugin> ``` # Publishing pact files to a pact broker **NOTE**: There is a pact CLI that can be used to publish pacts. See https://github.com/pact-foundation/pact-ruby-cli. The pact maven plugin provides a `publish` mojo that can publish all pact files in a directory to a pact broker. To use it, you need to add a publish configuration to the POM that defines the directory where the pact files are and the URL to the pact broker. For example: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <pactDirectory>path/to/pact/files</pactDirectory> <!-- Defaults to ${project.build.directory}/pacts --> <pactBrokerUrl>http://pactbroker:1234</pactBrokerUrl> <projectVersion>1.0.100</projectVersion> <!-- Defaults to ${project.version} --> <trimSnapshot>true</trimSnapshot> <!-- Defaults to false --> <skipPactPublish>false</skipPactPublish> <!-- Defaults to false --> </configuration> </plugin> ``` You can now execute `mvn pact:publish` to publish the pact files. _NOTE:_ The pact broker requires a version for all published pacts. The `publish` task will use the version of the project by default, but can be overwritten with the `projectVersion` property. Make sure you have set one otherwise the broker will reject the pact files. _NOTE_: By default, the pact broker has issues parsing `SNAPSHOT` versions. You can configure the publisher to automatically remove `-SNAPSHOT` from your version number by setting `trimSnapshot` to true. This setting does not modify non-snapshot versions. You can set any tags that the pacts should be published with by setting the `tags` list property. A common use of this is setting the tag to the current source control branch. This supports using pact with feature branches. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <pactDirectory>path/to/pact/files</pactDirectory> <!-- Defaults to ${project.build.directory}/pacts --> <pactBrokerUrl>http://pactbroker:1234</pactBrokerUrl> <projectVersion>1.0.100</projectVersion> <!-- Defaults to ${project.version} --> <tags> <tag>feature/feature_name</tag> </tags> </configuration> </plugin> ``` You can also specify the tags using the `pact.consumer.tags` Java system property [version 4.0.7+]. ## Publishing to an authenticated pact broker For an authenticated pact broker, you can pass in the credentials with the `pactBrokerUsername` and `pactBrokerPassword` properties. Currently, it only supports basic authentication or a bearer token. For example: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <pactBrokerUrl>http://pactbroker:1234</pactBrokerUrl> <pactBrokerUsername>USERNAME</pactBrokerUsername> <pactBrokerPassword>PASSWORD</pactBrokerPassword> </configuration> </plugin> ``` Or to use a bearer token: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.0.1</version> <configuration> <pactBrokerUrl>http://pactbroker:1234</pactBrokerUrl> <pactBrokerToken>TOKEN</pactBrokerToken> <!-- Replace TOKEN with the actual token --> <pactBrokerAuthenticationScheme>Bearer</pactBrokerAuthenticationScheme> </configuration> </plugin> ``` #### Using the Maven servers configuration You can use the servers setup in the Maven settings. To do this, setup a server as per the [Maven Server Settings](https://maven.apache.org/settings.html#Servers). Then set the server ID in the pact broker configuration in your POM. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <pactBrokerUrl>http://pactbroker:1234</pactBrokerUrl> <pactBrokerServerId>test-pact-broker</pactBrokerServerId> <!-- This must match the server id in the maven settings --> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ## Excluding pacts from being published You can exclude some of the pact files from being published by providing a list of regular expressions that match against the base names of the pact files. For example: ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <pactBrokerUrl>http://pactbroker:1234</pactBrokerUrl> <excludes> <exclude>.*\\-\\d+$</exclude> <!-- exclude pact files where the name ends in a dash followed by a number --> </excludes> </configuration> </plugin> ``` ### Overriding the handling of a body data type **NOTE: version 4.1.3+** By default, bodies will be handled based on their content types. For binary contents, the bodies will be base64 encoded when written to the Pact file and then decoded again when the file is loaded. You can change this with an override property: `pact.content_type.override.<TYPE>.<SUBTYPE>=text|binary`. For instance, setting `pact.content_type.override.application.pdf=text` will treat PDF bodies as a text type and not encode/decode them. # Publishing verification results to a Pact Broker For pacts that are loaded from a Pact Broker, the results of running the verification can be published back to the broker against the URL for the pact. You will be able to then see the result on the Pact Broker home screen. To turn on the verification publishing, set the system property `pact.verifier.publishResults` to `true` in the pact maven plugin, not surefire, configuration. ## Tagging the provider before verification results are published [4.0.1+] You can have a tag pushed against the provider version before the verification results are published. To do this you need set the `pact.provider.tag` JVM system property to the tag value. From 4.1.8+, you can specify multiple tags with a comma separated string for the `pact.provider.tag` system property. # Enabling other verification reports By default the verification report is written to the console. You can also enable a JSON or Markdown report by setting the `reports` configuration list. ```xml <plugin> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.provider</groupId> <artifactId>maven</artifactId> <version>4.1.0</version> <configuration> <reports> <report>console</report> <report>json</report> <report>markdown</report> </reports> </configuration> </plugin> ``` These reports will be written to `target/reports/pact`. # Pending Pact Support (version 4.1.0 and later) If your Pact broker supports pending pacts, you can enable support for that by enabling that on your Pact broker annotation or with JVM system properties. You also need to provide the tags that will be published with your provider's verification results. The broker will then label any pacts found that don't have a successful verification result as pending. That way, if they fail verification, the verifier will ignore those failures and not fail the build. For example: ```xml <pactBroker> <url>https://test.pactflow.io/</url> <tags> <tag>test</tag> </tags> <enablePending> <providerTags> <tag>master</tag> </providerTags> </enablePending> </pactBroker> ``` Then any pending pacts will not cause a build failure.

Group: au.com.dius.pact.provider Artifact: maven
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Artifact maven
Group au.com.dius.pact.provider
Version 4.2.0-beta.0
Last update 18. October 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 6
Dependencies maven-plugin-api, maven-plugin-annotations, maven-core, kotlin-stdlib, kotlin-reflect, provider,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

gradle from group au.com.dius.pact.provider (version 4.2.0-beta.0)

Gradle ====== Gradle plugin for verifying pacts against a provider. The Gradle plugin creates a task `pactVerify` to your build which will verify all configured pacts against your provider. __*Important Note: Any properties that need to be set when using the Gradle plugin need to be provided with `-P` and not `-D` as with the other Pact-JVM modules!*__ ## To Use It ### For Gradle versions 2.1+ ```groovy plugins { id "au.com.dius.pact" version "4.1.0" } ``` ### For Gradle versions prior to 2.1 #### 1.1. Add the gradle jar file to your build script class path: ```groovy buildscript { repositories { mavenCentral() } dependencies { classpath 'au.com.dius.pact.provider:gradle:4.1.0' } } ``` #### 1.2. Apply the pact plugin ```groovy apply plugin: 'au.com.dius.pact' ``` ### 2. Define the pacts between your consumers and providers ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { // You can define as many as you need, but each must have a unique name provider1 { // All the provider properties are optional, and have sensible defaults (shown below) protocol = 'http' host = 'localhost' port = 8080 path = '/' // Again, you can define as many consumers for each provider as you need, but each must have a unique name hasPactWith('consumer1') { // currently supports a file path using file() or a URL using url() pactSource = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } // Or if you have many pact files in a directory hasPactsWith('manyConsumers') { // Will define a consumer for each pact file in the directory. // Consumer name is read from contents of pact file pactFileLocation = file('path/to/pacts') } } } } ``` ### 3. Execute `gradle pactVerify` # Project Properties The following project properties can be specified with `-Pproperty=value` on the command line: |Property|Description| |--------|-----------| |`pact.showStacktrace`|This turns on stacktrace printing for each request. It can help with diagnosing network errors| |`pact.showFullDiff`|This turns on displaying the full diff of the expected versus actual bodies| |`pact.filter.consumers`|Comma seperated list of consumer names to verify| |`pact.filter.description`|Only verify interactions whose description match the provided regular expression| |`pact.filter.providerState`|Only verify interactions whose provider state match the provided regular expression. An empty string matches interactions that have no state| |`pact.filter.pacturl`|This filter allows just the just the changed pact specified in a webhook to be run. It should be used in conjunction with `pact.filter.consumers` | |`pact.verifier.publishResults`|Publishing of verification results will be skipped unless this property is set to 'true'| |`pact.matching.wildcard`|Enables matching of map values ignoring the keys when this property is set to 'true'| |`pact.verifier.disableUrlPathDecoding`|Disables decoding of request paths| |`pact.pactbroker.httpclient.usePreemptiveAuthentication`|Enables preemptive authentication with the pact broker when set to `true`| |`pact.provider.tag`|Sets the provider tag to push before publishing verification results (can use a comma separated list)| |`pact.content_type.override.<TYPE>.<SUBTYPE>=<VAL>` where `<VAL>` may be `text` or `binary`|Overrides the handling of a particular content type [4.1.3+]| ## Specifying the provider hostname at runtime If you need to calculate the provider hostname at runtime, you can give a Closure as the provider `host`. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { host = { lookupHostName() } hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } } } } ``` You can also give a Closure as the provider `port`. ## Specifying the pact file or URL at runtime If you need to calculate the pact file or URL at runtime, you can give a Closure as the provider `pactFile`. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { host = 'localhost' hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = { lookupPactFile() } } } } } ``` ## Starting and shutting down your provider If you need to start-up or shutdown your provider, define Gradle tasks for each action and set `startProviderTask` and `terminateProviderTask` properties of each provider. You could use the jetty tasks here if you provider is built as a WAR file. ```groovy // This will be called before the provider task task('startTheApp') { doLast { // start up your provider here } } // This will be called after the provider task task('killTheApp') { doLast { // kill your provider here } } pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { startProviderTask = startTheApp terminateProviderTask = killTheApp hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } } } } ``` Following typical Gradle behaviour, you can set the provider task properties to the actual tasks, or to the task names as a string (for the case when they haven't been defined yet). ## Preventing the chaining of provider verify task to `pactVerify` Normally a gradle task named `pactVerify_${provider.name}` is created and added as a task dependency for `pactVerify`. You can disable this dependency on a provider by setting `isDependencyForPactVerify` to `false` (defaults to `true`). ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { isDependencyForPactVerify = false hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } } } } ``` To run this task, you would then have to explicitly name it as in ```gradle pactVerify_provider1```, a normal ```gradle pactVerify``` would skip it. This can be useful when you want to define two providers, one with `startProviderTask`/`terminateProviderTask` and as second without, so you can manually start your provider (to debug it from your IDE, for example) but still want a `pactVerify` to run normally from your CI build. ## Enabling insecure SSL For providers that are running on SSL with self-signed certificates, you need to enable insecure SSL mode by setting `insecure = true` on the provider. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { insecure = true // allow SSL with a self-signed cert hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } } } } ``` ## Specifying a custom trust store For environments that are running their own certificate chains: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { trustStore = new File('relative/path/to/trustStore.jks') trustStorePassword = 'changeit' hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } } } } ``` `trustStore` is either relative to the current working (build) directory. `trustStorePassword` defaults to `changeit`. NOTE: The hostname will still be verified against the certificate. ## Modifying the HTTP Client Used The default HTTP client is used for all requests to providers (created with a call to `HttpClients.createDefault()`). This can be changed by specifying a closure assigned to createClient on the provider that returns a CloseableHttpClient. For example: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { createClient = { provider -> // This will enable the client to accept self-signed certificates HttpClients.custom().setSSLHostnameVerifier(new NoopHostnameVerifier()) .setSslcontext(new SSLContextBuilder().loadTrustMaterial(null, { x509Certificates, s -> true }) .build()) .build() } hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } } } } ``` ## Modifying the requests before they are sent Sometimes you may need to add things to the requests that can't be persisted in a pact file. Examples of these would be authentication tokens, which have a small life span. The Pact Gradle plugin provides a request filter that can be set to a closure on the provider that will be called before the request is made. This closure will receive the HttpRequest prior to it being executed. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { requestFilter = { req -> // Add an authorization header to each request req.addHeader('Authorization', 'OAUTH eyJhbGciOiJSUzI1NiIsImN0eSI6ImFw...') } hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') } } } } ``` __*Important Note:*__ You should only use this feature for things that can not be persisted in the pact file. By modifying the request, you are potentially modifying the contract from the consumer tests! ## Turning off URL decoding of the paths in the pact file By default the paths loaded from the pact file will be decoded before the request is sent to the provider. To turn this behaviour off, set the property `pact.verifier.disableUrlPathDecoding` to `true`. __*Important Note:*__ If you turn off the url path decoding, you need to ensure that the paths in the pact files are correctly encoded. The verifier will not be able to make a request with an invalid encoded path. ## Overriding the handling of a body data type **NOTE: version 4.1.3+** By default, bodies will be handled based on their content types. For binary contents, the bodies will be base64 encoded when written to the Pact file and then decoded again when the file is loaded. You can change this with an override property: `pact.content_type.override.<TYPE>.<SUBTYPE>=text|binary`. For instance, setting `pact.content_type.override.application.pdf=text` will treat PDF bodies as a text type and not encode/decode them. ## Provider States For a description of what provider states are, see the pact documentations: http://docs.pact.io/documentation/provider_states.html ### Using a state change URL For each provider you can specify a state change URL to use to switch the state of the provider. This URL will receive the providerState description and all the parameters from the pact file before each interaction via a POST. As for normal requests, a request filter (`stateChangeRequestFilter`) can also be set to manipulate the request before it is sent. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') stateChangeUrl = url('http://localhost:8001/tasks/pactStateChange') stateChangeUsesBody = false // defaults to true stateChangeRequestFilter = { req -> // Add an authorization header to each request req.addHeader('Authorization', 'OAUTH eyJhbGciOiJSUzI1NiIsImN0eSI6ImFw...') } } // or hasPactsWith('consumers') { pactFileLocation = file('path/to/pacts') stateChangeUrl = url('http://localhost:8001/tasks/pactStateChange') stateChangeUsesBody = false // defaults to true } } } } ``` If the `stateChangeUsesBody` is not specified, or is set to true, then the provider state description and parameters will be sent as JSON in the body of the request : ```json { "state" : "a provider state description", "params": { "a": "1", "b": "2" } } ``` If it is set to false, they will be passed as query parameters. #### Teardown calls for state changes You can enable teardown state change calls by setting the property `stateChangeTeardown = true` on the provider. This will add an `action` parameter to the state change call. The setup call before the test will receive `action=setup`, and then a teardown call will be made afterwards to the state change URL with `action=teardown`. ### Using a Closure You can set a closure to be called before each verification with a defined provider state. The closure will be called with the state description and parameters from the pact file. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') // Load a fixture file based on the provider state and then setup some database // data. Does not require a state change request so returns false stateChange = { providerState -> // providerState is an instance of ProviderState def fixture = loadFixtuerForProviderState(providerState) setupDatabase(fixture) } } } } } ``` #### Teardown calls for state changes You can enable teardown state change calls by setting the property `stateChangeTeardown = true` on the provider. This will add an `action` parameter to the state change closure call. The setup call before the test will receive `setup`, as the second parameter, and then a teardown call will be made afterwards with `teardown` as the second parameter. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = file('path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json') // Load a fixture file based on the provider state and then setup some database // data. Does not require a state change request so returns false stateChange = { providerState, action -> if (action == 'setup') { def fixture = loadFixtuerForProviderState(providerState) setupDatabase(fixture) } else { cleanupDatabase() } false } } } } } ``` #### Returning values that can be injected You can have values from the provider state callbacks be injected into most places (paths, query parameters, headers, bodies, etc.). This works by using the V3 spec generators with provider state callbacks that return values. One example of where this would be useful is API calls that require an ID which would be auto-generated by the database on the provider side, so there is no way to know what the ID would be beforehand. There are methods on the consumer DSLs that can provider an expression that contains variables (like '/api/user/${id}' for the path). The provider state callback can then return a map for values, and the `id` attribute from the map will be expanded in the expression. For URL callbacks, the values need to be returned as JSON in the response body. ## Filtering the interactions that are verified You can filter the interactions that are run using three project properties: `pact.filter.consumers`, `pact.filter.description` and `pact.filter.providerState`. Adding `-Ppact.filter.consumers=consumer1,consumer2` to the command line will only run the pact files for those consumers (consumer1 and consumer2). Adding `-Ppact.filter.description=a request for payment.*` will only run those interactions whose descriptions start with 'a request for payment'. `-Ppact.filter.providerState=.*payment` will match any interaction that has a provider state that ends with payment, and `-Ppact.filter.providerState=` will match any interaction that does not have a provider state. ## Verifying pact files from a pact broker You can setup your build to validate against the pacts stored in a pact broker. The pact gradle plugin will query the pact broker for all consumers that have a pact with the provider based on its name. ### For Pact-JVM 4.1.0 and later #### First: Add a `broker` configuration block You can enable Pact broker support by adding a `broker` configuration block to the `pact` block. For example: ```groovy pact { broker { pactBrokerUrl = 'https://your-broker-url/' // To use basic auth pactBrokerUsername = '<USERNAME>' pactBrokerPassword = '<PASSWORD>' // OR to use a bearer token pactBrokerToken = '<TOKEN>' } } ``` #### Second: Define your service provider ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { myProvider { // Define the name of your provider here fromPactBroker { selectors = latestTags('test') // specify your tags here. You can leave this out to just use the latest pacts } } } } ``` ### For Pact-JVM versions before 4.1.0 You configure your service provider and then use the `hasPactsFrom..` methods. For example: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { // You can get the latest pacts from the broker hasPactsFromPactBroker('http://pact-broker:5000/') // And/or you can get the latest pact with a specific tag hasPactsFromPactBrokerWithTag('http://pact-broker:5000/',"tagname") } } } ``` This will verify all pacts found in the pact broker where the provider name is 'provider1'. If you need to set any values on the consumers from the pact broker, you can add a Closure to configure them. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { hasPactsFromPactBroker('http://pact-broker:5000/') { consumer -> stateChange = { providerState -> /* state change code here */ true } } } } } ``` **NOTE: Currently the pacts are fetched from the broker during the configuration phase of the build. This means that if the broker is not available, you will not be able to run any Gradle tasks.** This should be fixed in a forth coming release. In the mean time, to only load the pacts when running the validate task, you can do something like: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { // Only load the pacts from the broker if the start tasks from the command line include pactVerify if ('pactVerify' in gradle.startParameter.taskNames) { hasPactsFromPactBroker('http://pact-broker:5000/') { consumer -> stateChange = { providerState -> /* state change code here */ true } } } } } } ``` #### Using an authenticated Pact Broker You can add the authentication details for the Pact Broker like so: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { hasPactsFromPactBroker('http://pact-broker:5000/', authentication: ['Basic', pactBrokerUser, pactBrokerPassword]) } } } ``` `pactBrokerUser` and `pactBrokerPassword` can be defined in the gradle properties. Or with a bearer token: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { hasPactsFromPactBroker('http://pact-broker:5000/', authentication: ['Bearer', pactBrokerToken]) } } } ``` Preemptive Authentication can be enabled by setting the `pact.pactbroker.httpclient.usePreemptiveAuthentication` property to `true`. **NOTE:** If you're using [pactflow.io](https://pactflow.io/), follow these instructions for configuring your [bearer token](https://docs.pactflow.io/docs/getting-started/#configuring-your-api-token). ### Allowing just the changed pact specified in a webhook to be verified [4.0.6+] When a consumer publishes a new version of a pact file, the Pact broker can fire off a webhook with the URL of the changed pact file. To allow only the changed pact file to be verified, you can override the URL by using the `pact.filter.consumers` and `pact.filter.pacturl` project properties. For example, running: ```console gradle pactVerify -Ppact.filter.consumers='Foo Web Client' -Ppact.filter.pacturl=https://test.pact.dius.com.au/pacts/provider/Activity%20Service/consumer/Foo%20Web%20Client/version/1.0.1 ``` will only run the verification for Foo Web Client with the given pact file URL. ## Verifying pact files from a S3 bucket **NOTE:** You will need to add the Amazon S3 SDK jar file to your project. Pact files stored in an S3 bucket can be verified by using an S3 URL to the pact file. I.e., ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { hasPactWith('consumer1') { pactFile = 's3://bucketname/path/to/provider1-consumer1-pact.json' } } } } ``` **NOTE:** you can't use the `url` function with S3 URLs, as the URL and URI classes from the Java SDK don't support URLs with the s3 scheme. # Publishing pact files to a pact broker **NOTE**: There is a pact CLI that can be used to publish pacts. See https://github.com/pact-foundation/pact-ruby-cli. The pact gradle plugin provides a `pactPublish` task that can publish all pact files in a directory to a pact broker. To use it, you need to add a publish configuration to the pact configuration that defines the directory where the pact files are and the URL to the pact broker. If you have configured your broker details in a broker configuration block, the task will use that. Otherwise, configure the broker details on the publish block. For example: ```groovy pact { publish { pactDirectory = '/pact/dir' // defaults to $buildDir/pacts pactBrokerUrl = 'http://pactbroker:1234' } } ``` You can set any tags that the pacts should be published with by setting the `tags` property. A common use of this is setting the tag to the current source control branch. This supports using pact with feature branches. ```groovy pact { publish { pactDirectory = '/pact/dir' // defaults to $buildDir/pacts tags = [project.pactBrokerTag] } } ``` _NOTE:_ The pact broker requires a version for all published pacts. The `pactPublish` task will use the version of the gradle project by default. You can override this with the `consumerVersion` property. Make sure you have set one otherwise the broker will reject the pact files. ## Publishing to an authenticated pact broker To publish to a broker protected by basic auth, include the username/password in the broker configuration For example: ```groovy pact { broker { pactBrokerUrl = 'https://your-broker-url/' // To use basic auth pactBrokerUsername = '<USERNAME>' pactBrokerPassword = '<PASSWORD>' // OR to use a bearer token pactBrokerToken = '<TOKEN>' } } ``` You can add the username and password as properties on the publish block. ```groovy pact { publish { pactBrokerUrl = 'https://mypactbroker.com' pactBrokerUsername = 'username' pactBrokerPassword = 'password' } } ``` or with a bearer token ```groovy pact { publish { pactBrokerUrl = 'https://mypactbroker.com' pactBrokerToken = 'token' } } ``` ## Excluding pacts from being published You can exclude some of the pact files from being published by providing a list of regular expressions that match against the base names of the pact files. For example: ```groovy pact { publish { excludes = [ '.*\\-\\d+$' ] // exclude all pact files that end with a dash followed by a number in the name } } ``` # Verifying a message provider The Gradle plugin has been updated to allow invoking test methods that can return the message contents from a message producer. To use it, set the way to invoke the verification to `ANNOTATED_METHOD`. This will allow the pact verification task to scan for test methods that return the message contents. Add something like the following to your gradle build file: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { messageProvider { verificationType = 'ANNOTATED_METHOD' packagesToScan = ['au.com.example.messageprovider.*'] // This is optional, but leaving it out will result in the entire // test classpath being scanned hasPactWith('messageConsumer') { pactFile = url('url/to/messagepact.json') } } } } ``` Now when the `pactVerify` task is run, will look for methods annotated with `@PactVerifyProvider` in the test classpath that have a matching description to what is in the pact file. ```groovy class ConfirmationKafkaMessageBuilderTest { @PactVerifyProvider('an order confirmation message') String verifyMessageForOrder() { Order order = new Order() order.setId(10000004) order.setExchange('ASX') order.setSecurityCode('CBA') order.setPrice(BigDecimal.TEN) order.setUnits(15) order.setGst(new BigDecimal('15.0')) order.setFees(BigDecimal.TEN) def message = new ConfirmationKafkaMessageBuilder() .withOrder(order) .build() JsonOutput.toJson(message) } } ``` It will then validate that the returned contents matches the contents for the message in the pact file. # Verification Reports The default behaviour is to display the verification being done to the console, and pass or fail the build via the normal Gradle mechanism. Additional reports can be generated from the verification. ## Enabling additional reports The verification reports can be controlled by adding a reports section to the pact configuration in the gradle build file. For example: ```groovy pact { reports { defaultReports() // adds the standard console output markdown // report in markdown format json // report in json format } } ``` Any report files will be written to "build/reports/pact". ## Additional Reports The following report types are available in addition to console output (which is enabled by default): `markdown`, `json`. # Publishing verification results to a Pact Broker For pacts that are loaded from a Pact Broker, the results of running the verification can be published back to the broker against the URL for the pact. You will be able to see the result on the Pact Broker home screen. To turn on the verification publishing, set the project property `pact.verifier.publishResults` to `true`. By default, the Gradle project version will be used as the provider version. You can override this by setting the `providerVersion` property. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { providerVersion = { branchName() + '-' + abbreviatedId() } hasPactsFromPactBroker('http://pact-broker:5000/', authentication: ['Basic', pactBrokerUser, pactBrokerPassword]) } } } ``` ## Tagging the provider before verification results are published [4.0.1+] You can have a tag pushed against the provider version before the verification results are published. There are two ways to do this with the Gradle plugin. You can provide a closure in a similar way to the provider version, i.e. ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { provider1 { providerVersion = { branchName() + '-' + abbreviatedId() } providerTags = { [ branchName() ] } hasPactsFromPactBroker('http://pact-broker:5000/', authentication: ['Basic', pactBrokerUser, pactBrokerPassword]) } } } ``` or you can set the `pact.provider.tag` JVM system property. For example: ```console $ ./gradlew -d pactverify -Ppact.verifier.publishResults=true -Dpact.provider.tag=Test2 ``` From 4.1.8+, you can specify multiple tags with an array for the `providerTag` value, or a comma separated string for the `pact.provider.tag` system property. # Pending Pact Support (version 4.1.0 and later) If your Pact broker supports pending pacts, you can enable support for that by enabling that on your Pact broker annotation or with JVM system properties. You also need to provide the tags that will be published with your provider's verification results. The broker will then label any pacts found that don't have a successful verification result as pending. That way, if they fail verification, the verifier will ignore those failures and not fail the build. For example: ```groovy pact { serviceProviders { myProvider { fromPactBroker { selectors = latestTags('test') // specify your tags here. You can leave this out to just use the latest pacts enablePending = true // enable pending pacts support providerTags = ['master'] // specify the provider main-line tags } } } } ``` Then any pending pacts will not cause a build failure.

Group: au.com.dius.pact.provider Artifact: gradle
Show all versions Show documentation Show source 
 

0 downloads
Artifact gradle
Group au.com.dius.pact.provider
Version 4.2.0-beta.0
Last update 18. October 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 1
Dependencies provider,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!



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