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groupdocs-editor from group com.groupdocs (version 17.9)

GroupDocs.Editor for Java is a powerful document editing API using HTML. API can be used with any external, opensource or paid HTML editor. Editor API will process to load documents, convert it to HTML, provide HTML to external UI and then save HTML to original document after manipulation. It can also be used to generate different PDF files, Microsoft Word (DOC, DOCX), Excel spreadsheets (XLS, XSLSX), PowerPoint presentations (PPT, PPTX) and TXT documents. Manipulate Using HTML: Load Document Edit content using HTML Edit styles Perform Editor operations Convert back to supported file Document Editor is a computer program for editing HTML, the markup of a webpage. Although the HTML markup of a web page can be written with any text editor, specialized HTML editors can offer convenience and added functionality. For example, many HTML editors handle not only HTML, but also related technologies such as CSS, XML and JavaScript or ECMAScript. In some cases they also manage communication with remote web servers via FTP and WebDAV, and version control systems such as Subversion or Git. Many word processing, graphic design and page layout programs that are not dedicated to web design, such as Microsoft Word or Quark XPress, also have the ability to function as HTML editors.

Group: com.groupdocs Artifact: groupdocs-editor
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14 downloads
Artifact groupdocs-editor
Group com.groupdocs
Version 17.9
Last update 10. January 2018
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://products.groupdocs.com/editor
License GroupDocs License, Version 1.0
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

git-commit-id-plugin from group at.molindo (version 2.1.10-alpha-1)

git-commit-id-plugin is a plugin quite similar to https://fisheye.codehaus.org/browse/mojo/tags/buildnumber-maven-plugin-1.0-beta-4 for example but as buildnumber only supports svn (which is very sad) and cvs (which is even more sad). This plugin makes basic repository information available through maven resources. This can be used to display "what version is this?" or "who has deployed this and when, from which branch?" information at runtime - making it easy to find things like "oh, that isn't deployed yet, I'll test it tomorrow" and making both testers and developers life easier. The data currently exported is like this (that's the end effect from the GitRepositoryState Bean): { "branch" : "testing-maven-git-plugin", "commitTime" : "06.01.1970 @ 16:16:26 CET", "commitId" : "787e39f61f99110e74deed68ab9093088d64b969", "commitUserName" : "Konrad Malawski", "commitUserEmail" : "[email protected]", "commitMessageFull" : "releasing my fun plugin :-) + fixed some typos + cleaned up directory structure + added license etc", "commitMessageShort" : "releasing my fun plugin :-)", "buildTime" : "06.01.1970 @ 16:17:53 CET", "buildUserName" : "Konrad Malawski", "buildUserEmail" : "[email protected]" } Note that the data is exported via maven resource filtering and is really easy to use with spring - which I've explained in detail in this readme https://github.com/ktoso/maven-git-commit-id-plugin

Group: at.molindo Artifact: git-commit-id-plugin
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Artifact git-commit-id-plugin
Group at.molindo
Version 2.1.10-alpha-1
Last update 28. December 2015
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL http://www.blog.project13.pl
License GNU Lesser General Public License 3.0
Dependencies amount 8
Dependencies maven-plugin-api, maven-project, jackson-databind, guice, joda-time, guava, annotations, org.eclipse.jgit,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

banana-split from group de.drni.bananasplit (version 0.4.0)

DICTIONARY-BASED COMPOUND SPLITTER FOR GERMAN BananaSplit is a compound splitter for German that uses a dictionary resource. The dictionary can be either a simple word list, or a word list equipped with POS values, or an XML based dictionary. The original version was able to use GermaNet as a dictionary. This is useful in applications that rely on GermaNet anyway: no additional lexicon needs to be generated and held in memory. This was also the original purpose of BananaSplit. It served as a compound splitter for a tool called BananaRelation. BananaRelation cannot be published here as it makes heavy use of unpublished code by EML Research, Heidelberg. BananaSplit can either be used as a standalone application or it can be integrated into other Java programs (as a library). This program emerged from the seminar Lexical Semantic Processing in NLP (winter term 2005/2006) taught by Iryna Gurevych at the Seminar für Sprachwissenschaft, Tübingen. Both BananaSplit and BananaRelation were introduced to the seminar participants on 17th of December, 2005. The key algorithm for compound splitting is based on Langer (1998). The program came to use in Müller and Gurevych (2006). Please note that the program splits compounds into two parts only. Details are given in the documents linked below.

Group: de.drni.bananasplit Artifact: banana-split
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Artifact banana-split
Group de.drni.bananasplit
Version 0.4.0
Last update 11. September 2012
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL http://niels.drni.de/s9y/pages/bananasplit.html
License Apache License 2.0
Dependencies amount 1
Dependencies oz-generic-levenshtein,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

mydas from group uk.ac.ebi.mydas (version 1.0.2)

This project aims to offer an easy-to-extend Java DAS server framework. It offers several advantages: * Implementing data sources is very easy but also flexible and powerful. * Data caching is built into the system, with access to the caching mechanism made available to the data sources. * All aspects of the server are highly configurable, including selecting options where the DAS 1.53 specification offers choices to the implementor. * The latest Java technologies have been used throughout the system to optimise performance and simplify data source development. * Wherever possible the same terminology is used in the API as in the DAS specification and XML - again, making data source development more easy. * The server allows XSLT transforms of the DAS XML to be configured to provide a simple DAS client view (limited to the single DAS source). More details of the DAS protocol, DAS servers and DAS clients can be found at http://www.biodas.org/wiki/Main_Page. The first version of this server is a complete implementation of Distributed Sequence Annotation System (DAS) Version 1.53. If you are interested in learning more about DAS 1.53, the specification is highly recommended as a concise and complete description of the DAS protocol that can be obtained from: http://biodas.org/documents/spec.html

Group: uk.ac.ebi.mydas Artifact: mydas
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0 downloads
Artifact mydas
Group uk.ac.ebi.mydas
Version 1.0.2
Last update 19. August 2007
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL http://code.google.com/p/mydas/
License The Apache Software License 2.0
Dependencies amount 7
Dependencies commons-collections, servlet-api, log4j, xpp3, xercesImpl, oscache, commons-logging,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

java8 from group au.com.dius.pact.consumer (version 4.1.6)

# pact-jvm-consumer-java8 Provides a Java8 lambda based DSL for use with Junit to build consumer tests. # A Lambda DSL for Pact This is an extension for the pact DSL provided by [consumer](../consumer). The difference between the default pact DSL and this lambda DSL is, as the name suggests, the usage of lambdas. The use of lambdas makes the code much cleaner. ## Why a new DSL implementation? The lambda DSL solves the following two main issues. Both are visible in the following code sample: ```java new PactDslJsonArray() .array() # open an array .stringValue("a1") # choose the method that is valid for arrays .stringValue("a2") # choose the method that is valid for arrays .closeArray() # close the array .array() # open an array .numberValue(1) # choose the method that is valid for arrays .numberValue(2) # choose the method that is valid for arrays .closeArray() # close the array .array() # open an array .object() # now we work with an object .stringValue("foo", "Foo") # choose the method that is valid for objects .closeObject() # close the object and we're back in the array .closeArray() # close the array ``` ### The existing DSL is quite error-prone Methods may only be called in certain states. For example `object()` may only be called when you're currently working on an array whereas `object(name)` is only allowed to be called when working on an object. But both of the methods are available. You'll find out at runtime if you're using the correct method. Finally, the need for opening and closing objects and arrays makes usage cumbersome. The lambda DSL has no ambiguous methods and there's no need to close objects and arrays as all the work on such an object is wrapped in a lamda call. ### The existing DSL is hard to read When formatting your source code with an IDE the code becomes hard to read as there's no indentation possible. Of course, you could do it by hand but we want auto formatting! Auto formatting works great for the new DSL! ```java array.object((o) -> { o.stringValue("foo", "Foo"); # an attribute o.stringValue("bar", "Bar"); # an attribute o.object("tar", (tarObject) -> { # an attribute with a nested object tarObject.stringValue("a", "A"); # attribute of the nested object tarObject.stringValue("b", "B"); # attribute of the nested object }) }); ``` ## Installation ### Maven ``` <dependency> <groupId>au.com.dius.pact.consumer</groupId> <artifactId>java8</artifactId> <version>${pact.version}</version> </dependency> ``` ## Usage Start with a static import of `LambdaDsl`. This class contains factory methods for the lambda dsl extension. When you come accross the `body()` method of `PactDslWithProvider` builder start using the new extensions. The call to `LambdaDsl` replaces the call to instance `new PactDslJsonArray()` and `new PactDslJsonBody()` of the pact library. ```java io.pactfoundation.consumer.dsl.LambdaDsl.* ``` ### Response body as json array ```java import static io.pactfoundation.consumer.dsl.LambdaDsl.newJsonArray; ... PactDslWithProvider builder = ... builder.given("some state") .uponReceiving("a request") .path("/my-app/my-service") .method("GET") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body(newJsonArray((a) -> { a.stringValue("a1"); a.stringValue("a2"); }).build()); ``` ### Response body as json object ```java import static io.pactfoundation.consumer.dsl.LambdaDsl.newJsonBody; ... PactDslWithProvider builder = ... builder.given("some state") .uponReceiving("a request") .path("/my-app/my-service") .method("GET") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body(newJsonBody((o) -> { o.stringValue("foo", "Foo"); o.stringValue("bar", "Bar"); }).build()); ``` ### Examples #### Simple Json object When creating simple json structures the difference between the two approaches isn't big. ##### JSON ```json { "bar": "Bar", "foo": "Foo" } ``` ##### Pact DSL ```java new PactDslJsonBody() .stringValue("foo", "Foo") .stringValue("bar", "Bar") ``` ##### Lambda DSL ```java newJsonBody((o) -> { o.stringValue("foo", "Foo"); o.stringValue("bar", "Bar"); }).build(); ``` #### An array of arrays When we come to more complex constructs with arrays and nested objects the beauty of lambdas become visible! ##### JSON ```json [ ["a1", "a2"], [1, 2], [{"foo": "Foo"}] ] ``` ##### Pact DSL ```java new PactDslJsonArray() .array() .stringValue("a1") .stringValue("a2") .closeArray() .array() .numberValue(1) .numberValue(2) .closeArray() .array() .object() .stringValue("foo", "Foo") .closeObject() .closeArray(); ``` ##### Lambda DSL ```java newJsonArray((rootArray) -> { rootArray.array((a) -> a.stringValue("a1").stringValue("a2")); rootArray.array((a) -> a.numberValue(1).numberValue(2)); rootArray.array((a) -> a.object((o) -> o.stringValue("foo", "Foo"))); }).build(); ``` ##### Kotlin Lambda DSL ```kotlin newJsonArray { newArray { stringValue("a1") stringValue("a2") } newArray { numberValue(1) numberValue(2) } newArray { newObject { stringValue("foo", "Foo") } } } ```

Group: au.com.dius.pact.consumer Artifact: java8
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0 downloads
Artifact java8
Group au.com.dius.pact.consumer
Version 4.1.6
Last update 03. July 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 1
Dependencies consumer,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-consumer-java8_2.12 from group au.com.dius (version 3.6.15)

# pact-jvm-consumer-java8 Provides a Java8 lambda based DSL for use with Junit to build consumer tests. # A Lambda DSL for Pact This is an extension for the pact DSL provided by [pact-jvm-consumer](../pact-jvm-consumer). The difference between the default pact DSL and this lambda DSL is, as the name suggests, the usage of lambdas. The use of lambdas makes the code much cleaner. ## Why a new DSL implementation? The lambda DSL solves the following two main issues. Both are visible in the following code sample: ```java new PactDslJsonArray() .array() # open an array .stringValue("a1") # choose the method that is valid for arrays .stringValue("a2") # choose the method that is valid for arrays .closeArray() # close the array .array() # open an array .numberValue(1) # choose the method that is valid for arrays .numberValue(2) # choose the method that is valid for arrays .closeArray() # close the array .array() # open an array .object() # now we work with an object .stringValue("foo", "Foo") # choose the method that is valid for objects .closeObject() # close the object and we're back in the array .closeArray() # close the array ``` ### The existing DSL is quite error-prone Methods may only be called in certain states. For example `object()` may only be called when you're currently working on an array whereas `object(name)` is only allowed to be called when working on an object. But both of the methods are available. You'll find out at runtime if you're using the correct method. Finally, the need for opening and closing objects and arrays makes usage cumbersome. The lambda DSL has no ambiguous methods and there's no need to close objects and arrays as all the work on such an object is wrapped in a lamda call. ### The existing DSL is hard to read When formatting your source code with an IDE the code becomes hard to read as there's no indentation possible. Of course, you could do it by hand but we want auto formatting! Auto formatting works great for the new DSL! ```java array.object((o) -> { o.stringValue("foo", "Foo"); # an attribute o.stringValue("bar", "Bar"); # an attribute o.object("tar", (tarObject) -> { # an attribute with a nested object tarObject.stringValue("a", "A"); # attribute of the nested object tarObject.stringValue("b", "B"); # attribute of the nested object }) }); ``` ## Installation ### Maven ``` <dependency> <groupId>au.com.dius</groupId> <artifactId>pact-jvm-consumer-java8_2.12</artifactId> <version>${pact.version}</version> </dependency> ``` ## Usage Start with a static import of `LambdaDsl`. This class contains factory methods for the lambda dsl extension. When you come accross the `body()` method of `PactDslWithProvider` builder start using the new extensions. The call to `LambdaDsl` replaces the call to instance `new PactDslJsonArray()` and `new PactDslJsonBody()` of the pact library. ```java io.pactfoundation.consumer.dsl.LambdaDsl.* ``` ### Response body as json array ```java import static io.pactfoundation.consumer.dsl.LambdaDsl.newJsonArray; ... PactDslWithProvider builder = ... builder.given("some state") .uponReceiving("a request") .path("/my-app/my-service") .method("GET") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body(newJsonArray((a) -> { a.stringValue("a1"); a.stringValue("a2"); }).build()); ``` ### Response body as json object ```java import static io.pactfoundation.consumer.dsl.LambdaDsl.newJsonBody; ... PactDslWithProvider builder = ... builder.given("some state") .uponReceiving("a request") .path("/my-app/my-service") .method("GET") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body(newJsonBody((o) -> { o.stringValue("foo", "Foo"); o.stringValue("bar", "Bar"); }).build()); ``` ### Examples #### Simple Json object When creating simple json structures the difference between the two approaches isn't big. ##### JSON ```json { "bar": "Bar", "foo": "Foo" } ``` ##### Pact DSL ```java new PactDslJsonBody() .stringValue("foo", "Foo") .stringValue("bar", "Bar") ``` ##### Lambda DSL ```java newJsonBody((o) -> { o.stringValue("foo", "Foo"); o.stringValue("bar", "Bar"); }).build(); ``` #### An array of arrays When we come to more complex constructs with arrays and nested objects the beauty of lambdas become visible! ##### JSON ```json [ ["a1", "a2"], [1, 2], [{"foo": "Foo"}] ] ``` ##### Pact DSL ```java new PactDslJsonArray() .array() .stringValue("a1") .stringValue("a2") .closeArray() .array() .numberValue(1) .numberValue(2) .closeArray() .array() .object() .stringValue("foo", "Foo") .closeObject() .closeArray(); ``` ##### Lambda DSL ```java newJsonArray((rootArray) -> { rootArray.array((a) -> a.stringValue("a1").stringValue("a2")); rootArray.array((a) -> a.numberValue(1).numberValue(2)); rootArray.array((a) -> a.object((o) -> o.stringValue("foo", "Foo"))); }).build(); ``` `object` is a reserved word in Kotlin. To allow using the DSL without escaping, a Kotlin extension `newObject` is available: ```kotlin newJsonArray { rootArray -> rootArray.array { a -> a.stringValue("a1").stringValue("a2") } rootArray.array { a -> a.numberValue(1).numberValue(2) } rootArray.array { a -> a.newObject { o -> o.stringValue("foo", "Foo") } } }.build(); ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-consumer-java8_2.12
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Artifact pact-jvm-consumer-java8_2.12
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.6.15
Last update 29. April 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 1
Dependencies pact-jvm-consumer_2.12,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

pact-jvm-consumer-java8 from group au.com.dius (version 4.0.10)

# pact-jvm-consumer-java8 Provides a Java8 lambda based DSL for use with Junit to build consumer tests. # A Lambda DSL for Pact This is an extension for the pact DSL provided by [pact-jvm-consumer](../pact-jvm-consumer). The difference between the default pact DSL and this lambda DSL is, as the name suggests, the usage of lambdas. The use of lambdas makes the code much cleaner. ## Why a new DSL implementation? The lambda DSL solves the following two main issues. Both are visible in the following code sample: ```java new PactDslJsonArray() .array() # open an array .stringValue("a1") # choose the method that is valid for arrays .stringValue("a2") # choose the method that is valid for arrays .closeArray() # close the array .array() # open an array .numberValue(1) # choose the method that is valid for arrays .numberValue(2) # choose the method that is valid for arrays .closeArray() # close the array .array() # open an array .object() # now we work with an object .stringValue("foo", "Foo") # choose the method that is valid for objects .closeObject() # close the object and we're back in the array .closeArray() # close the array ``` ### The existing DSL is quite error-prone Methods may only be called in certain states. For example `object()` may only be called when you're currently working on an array whereas `object(name)` is only allowed to be called when working on an object. But both of the methods are available. You'll find out at runtime if you're using the correct method. Finally, the need for opening and closing objects and arrays makes usage cumbersome. The lambda DSL has no ambiguous methods and there's no need to close objects and arrays as all the work on such an object is wrapped in a lamda call. ### The existing DSL is hard to read When formatting your source code with an IDE the code becomes hard to read as there's no indentation possible. Of course, you could do it by hand but we want auto formatting! Auto formatting works great for the new DSL! ```java array.object((o) -> { o.stringValue("foo", "Foo"); # an attribute o.stringValue("bar", "Bar"); # an attribute o.object("tar", (tarObject) -> { # an attribute with a nested object tarObject.stringValue("a", "A"); # attribute of the nested object tarObject.stringValue("b", "B"); # attribute of the nested object }) }); ``` ## Installation ### Maven ``` <dependency> <groupId>au.com.dius</groupId> <artifactId>pact-jvm-consumer-java8_2.12</artifactId> <version>${pact.version}</version> </dependency> ``` ## Usage Start with a static import of `LambdaDsl`. This class contains factory methods for the lambda dsl extension. When you come accross the `body()` method of `PactDslWithProvider` builder start using the new extensions. The call to `LambdaDsl` replaces the call to instance `new PactDslJsonArray()` and `new PactDslJsonBody()` of the pact library. ```java io.pactfoundation.consumer.dsl.LambdaDsl.* ``` ### Response body as json array ```java import static io.pactfoundation.consumer.dsl.LambdaDsl.newJsonArray; ... PactDslWithProvider builder = ... builder.given("some state") .uponReceiving("a request") .path("/my-app/my-service") .method("GET") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body(newJsonArray((a) -> { a.stringValue("a1"); a.stringValue("a2"); }).build()); ``` ### Response body as json object ```java import static io.pactfoundation.consumer.dsl.LambdaDsl.newJsonBody; ... PactDslWithProvider builder = ... builder.given("some state") .uponReceiving("a request") .path("/my-app/my-service") .method("GET") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body(newJsonBody((o) -> { o.stringValue("foo", "Foo"); o.stringValue("bar", "Bar"); }).build()); ``` ### Examples #### Simple Json object When creating simple json structures the difference between the two approaches isn't big. ##### JSON ```json { "bar": "Bar", "foo": "Foo" } ``` ##### Pact DSL ```java new PactDslJsonBody() .stringValue("foo", "Foo") .stringValue("bar", "Bar") ``` ##### Lambda DSL ```java newJsonBody((o) -> { o.stringValue("foo", "Foo"); o.stringValue("bar", "Bar"); }).build(); ``` #### An array of arrays When we come to more complex constructs with arrays and nested objects the beauty of lambdas become visible! ##### JSON ```json [ ["a1", "a2"], [1, 2], [{"foo": "Foo"}] ] ``` ##### Pact DSL ```java new PactDslJsonArray() .array() .stringValue("a1") .stringValue("a2") .closeArray() .array() .numberValue(1) .numberValue(2) .closeArray() .array() .object() .stringValue("foo", "Foo") .closeObject() .closeArray(); ``` ##### Lambda DSL ```java newJsonArray((rootArray) -> { rootArray.array((a) -> a.stringValue("a1").stringValue("a2")); rootArray.array((a) -> a.numberValue(1).numberValue(2)); rootArray.array((a) -> a.object((o) -> o.stringValue("foo", "Foo"))); }).build(); ``` ##### Kotlin Lambda DSL ```kotlin newJsonArray { newArray { stringValue("a1") stringValue("a2") } newArray { numberValue(1) numberValue(2) } newArray { newObject { stringValue("foo", "Foo") } } } ```

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-consumer-java8
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0 downloads
Artifact pact-jvm-consumer-java8
Group au.com.dius
Version 4.0.10
Last update 18. April 2020
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 1
Dependencies pact-jvm-consumer,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

jsgen from group com.github.jochenw (version 1.2)

Jsgen is a Java Source Generation Framework: That means, it should be a valuable tool, if you intend to write a custom generator for Java sources. As such, it is the successor of a previous framework, called JaxMeJS (http://jaxme.sourceforge.net/JaxMeJS/docs/index.html). The predecessor came into being as a standalone project. It was incorporated into the bigger JaxMe project, when the latter was adopted by the Apache Webservices project. And it was buried as part of the bigger project, when the latter was moved to the Apache Attic (http://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/webservices/archive/jaxme/). That was fine for quite some time, because the latest released version (JaxMeJS 0.5.2) did its job quite well. Over the years, however, the Java language has evolved, and the lack of support for features like Generics, or Annotations, became a burden. Hence the Successor: Jsgen picks up, where JaxMeJS ended. It is, however, a complete rewrite with several additional features, that the author considers to be important for modern Java applications: 1. It supports Generics. 2. It supports Annotations. 3. The builder pattern has been adopted. Almost all important classes are implemented as builders. This should make writing the actual source generators much more concise, and maintainable, than it used to be before. 4. The code style is configurable. Code styles allow you to concentrate on the actual work. The resulting Jave source will look nicely formatted, anyways. As of this writing, you can select between two builtin code styles: - The default code style is basically the authors personal free style, roughly comparable to the default code style of the Eclipse Java IDE. - As an alternative, there is also a Maven code style, which is widely used in the Open Source communities. Compared to the default style, it is less concise, if not even a bit verbose. On the other hand, it is widely adopted by projects in the vicinity of {{{https://maven.apache.org}Apache Maven}}. 5. Import lists are created, and sorted, automatically.

Group: com.github.jochenw Artifact: jsgen
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Artifact jsgen
Group com.github.jochenw
Version 1.2
Last update 10. November 2019
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://jochenw.github.io/jsgen
License Apache License, Version 2.0
Dependencies amount 1
Dependencies jsr305,
There are maybe transitive dependencies!

HockeySDK from group net.hockeyapp.android (version 5.2.0)

HockeySDK-Android implements support for using HockeyApp in your Android application. The following features are currently supported: Collect crash reports:If your app crashes, a crash log is written to the device's storage. If the user starts the app again, they will be asked asked to submit the crash report to HockeyApp. This works for both beta and live apps, i.e. those submitted to Google Play or other app stores. Crash logs contain viable information for you to help resolve the issue. Furthermore, you as a developer can add additional information to the report as well. Update Alpha/Beta apps: The app will check with HockeyApp if a new version for your alpha/beta build is available. If yes, it will show a dialog to users and let them see the release notes, the version history and start the installation process right away. You can even force the installation of certain updates. User Metrics: Understand user behavior to improve your app. Track usage through daily and monthly active users. Monitor crash impacted users. Measure customer engagement through session count. Add custom tracking calls to learn which features your users are actually using. This feature requires a minimum API level of 14 (Android 4.x Ice Cream Sandwich). Feedback: Besides crash reports, collecting feedback from your users from within your app is a great option to help with improving your app. You act on and answer feedback directly from the HockeyApp backend. Authenticate: Identify and authenticate users against your registered testers with the HockeyApp backend.

Group: net.hockeyapp.android Artifact: HockeySDK
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Artifact HockeySDK
Group net.hockeyapp.android
Version 5.2.0
Last update 21. May 2019
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/bitstadium/hockeysdk-android
License MIT
Dependencies amount 0
Dependencies No dependencies
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pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.11 from group au.com.dius (version 3.5.24)

pact-jvm-consumer-junit5 ======================== JUnit 5 support for Pact consumer tests ## Dependency The library is available on maven central using: * group-id = `au.com.dius` * artifact-id = `pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.12` * version-id = `3.5.x` ## Usage ### 1. Add the Pact consumer test extension to the test class. To write Pact consumer tests with JUnit 5, you need to add `@ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt)` to your test class. This replaces the `PactRunner` used for JUnit 4 tests. The rest of the test follows a similar pattern as for JUnit 4 tests. ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` ### 2. create a method annotated with `@Pact` that returns the interactions for the test For each test (as with JUnit 4), you need to define a method annotated with the `@Pact` annotation that returns the interactions for the test. ```java @Pact(provider="test_provider", consumer="test_consumer") public RequestResponsePact createPact(PactDslWithProvider builder) { return builder .given("test state") .uponReceiving("ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest test interaction") .path("/") .method("GET") .willRespondWith() .status(200) .body("{\"responsetest\": true}") .toPact(); } ``` ### 3. Link the mock server with the interactions for the test with `@PactTestFor` Then the final step is to use the `@PactTestFor` annotation to tell the Pact extension how to setup the Pact test. You can either put this annotation on the test class, or on the test method. For examples see [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) and [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy). The `@PactTestFor` annotation allows you to control the mock server in the same way as the JUnit 4 `PactProviderRule`. It allows you to set the hostname to bind to (default is `localhost`) and the port (default is to use a random port). You can also set the Pact specification version to use (default is V3). ```java @ExtendWith(PactConsumerTestExt.class) @PactTestFor(providerName = "ArticlesProvider", port = "1234") public class ExampleJavaConsumerPactTest { ``` **NOTE on the hostname**: The mock server runs in the same JVM as the test, so the only valid values for hostname are: | hostname | result | | -------- | ------ | | `localhost` | binds to the address that localhost points to (normally the loopback adapter) | | `127.0.0.1` or `::1` | binds to the loopback adapter | | host name | binds to the default interface that the host machines DNS name resolves to | | `0.0.0.0` or `::` | binds to the all interfaces on the host machine | #### Matching the interactions by provider name If you set the `providerName` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the first method with a `@Pact` annotation with the same provider name will be used. See [ArticlesTest](src/test/java/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/ArticlesTest.java) for an example. #### Matching the interactions by method name If you set the `pactMethod` on the `@PactTestFor` annotation, then the method with the provided name will be used (it still needs a `@Pact` annotation). See [MultiTest](src/test/groovy/au/com/dius/pact/consumer/junit5/MultiTest.groovy) for an example. ### Injecting the mock server into the test You can get the mock server injected into the test method by adding a `MockServer` parameter to the test method. ```java @Test void test(MockServer mockServer) { HttpResponse httpResponse = Request.Get(mockServer.getUrl() + "/articles.json").execute().returnResponse(); assertThat(httpResponse.getStatusLine().getStatusCode(), is(equalTo(200))); } ``` This helps with getting the base URL of the mock server, especially when a random port is used. ## Unsupported The current implementation does not support tests with multiple providers. This will be added in a later release.

Group: au.com.dius Artifact: pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.11
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Artifact pact-jvm-consumer-junit5_2.11
Group au.com.dius
Version 3.5.24
Last update 04. November 2018
Newest version Yes
Organization not specified
URL https://github.com/DiUS/pact-jvm
License Apache 2
Dependencies amount 9
Dependencies kotlin-stdlib-jdk8, kotlin-reflect, slf4j-api, groovy-all, kotlin-logging, scala-library, scala-logging_2.11, pact-jvm-consumer_2.11, junit-jupiter-api,
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